Now showing items 21-40 of 1244

    • FU19 Nephrops grounds 2018 UWTV survey report and catch scenarios for 2019.

      Aristegui, M.; O’Brien, S.; Blaszkowski, M.; O’Connor, S.; Fitzgerald, R.; Doyle, J. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      This report provides the main results of the ninth underwater television survey of the various Nephrops patches in Functional Unit 19. The survey was multidisciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, multi-beam and other ecosystem data. In 2018 a total 42 UWTV stations were successfully completed. The mean density estimates varied considerably across the different patches. The 2018 raised abundance estimate was a 65% decrease from the 2017 estimate and at 176 million burrows is below the MSY Btrigger (430 million). Using the 2018 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch of 173 tonnes and landings of 130 tonnes in 2018 when MSY approach is applied (assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2015–2017). One species of sea pen was observed; Virgularia mirabilis, which has been observed on previous surveys of FU19. Trawl marks were observed at 36% of the stations surveyed.
    • Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne Head Nephrops Grounds (FU17) 2018 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2019

      Doyle, J.; O’ Brien, S.; Ryan, G.; Galligan, S.; Hernon, P.; Aristegui, M.; Vacherot, J.P. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the seventeenth annual underwater television on the Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne head Nephrops grounds, ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 17. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, fishing, CTD and other ecosystem data. In 2018 a total of 43 UWTV stations were successfully completed, 33 on the Aran Grounds, 5 on Galway Bay and 5 on Slyne Head patches. The mean burrow density observed in 2018, adjusted for edge effect, was medium at 0.40 burrows/m². The final krigged burrow abundance estimate for the Aran Grounds was 488 million burrows with a CV (relative standard error) of 3%. The final abundance estimate for Galway Bay and Slyne Head was 33 million in both grounds with CVs of 17% and 12% respectively. The total abundance estimates have fluctuated considerably over the time series. The 2018 combined abundance estimate was a 37% increase compared to in 2017 and at 554 million burrows and is above the MSY Btrigger reference point (540 million burrows). Using the 2018 abundance estimate and updated stock data implies catch of 1002 tonnes and landings of 916 tonnes in 2019 when the MSY approach is applied (assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2015–2017). Virgularia mirabilis was the only sea-pen species observed on the UWTV footage. Trawl marks were present at 9% of the Aran stations surveyed.
    • National Infrastructure Access Programme (NIAP), research and innovation projects 2015.

      Dublin City University; Smartbay (Dublin City University, 2015)
      The SmartBay NIAP fund was made available in 2012 through Dublin City University over a two year period to enable researchers to access the SmartBay Ireland National Test and Demonstration Facility in Galway Bay. Research proposals were invited for funding under a number of activity types that are in line with the objectives of the SmartBay PRTLI Cycle 5 programme. This fund provided small awards (typically €2-25K) to research teams through a national competitive process, which was open to all higher education institutions on the island of Ireland. There were both open and biannual calls. The SmartBay NIAP fund was established to enable researchers in academia and industry to access the SmartBay Ireland national test and demonstration infrastructure. Proposals to access the infrastructure were brief and required information on the researcher(s), a description of the proposed research and its potential impact to the research team arising from the access to SmartBay Ireland.
    • National Infrastructure Access Programme (NIAP), research and innovation projects 2014.

      Dublin City University; Smartbay (Dublin City University, 2014)
      The SmartBay NIAP fund was made available in 2012 through Dublin City University over a two year period to enable researchers to access the SmartBay Ireland National Test and Demonstration Facility in Galway Bay. Research proposals were invited for funding under a number of activity types that are in line with the objectives of the SmartBay PRTLI Cycle 5 programme. This fund provided small awards (typically €2-25K) to research teams through a national competitive process, which was open to all higher education institutions on the island of Ireland. There were both open and biannual calls. The SmartBay NIAP fund was established to enable researchers in academia and industry to access the SmartBay Ireland national test and demonstration infrastructure. Proposals to access the infrastructure were brief and required information on the researcher(s), a description of the proposed research and its potential impact to the research team arising from the access to SmartBay Ireland.
    • The drivers of sea lice management policies and how best to integrate them into a risk management strategy: An ecosystem approach to sea lice management.

      Jackson, D; Moberg, O; Stenevik Djupevåg, E M; Kane, F; Hareide, H (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2018)
      The control of sea lice infestations on cultivated Atlantic salmon is a major issue in many regions of the world. The numerous drivers which shape the priorities and objectives of the control strategies vary for different regions/jurisdictions. These range from the animal welfare and economic priorities of the producers, to the mitigation of any potential impacts on wild stocks. Veterinary ethics, environmental impacts of therapeutants, and impacts for organic certification of the produce are, amongst others, additional sets of factors which should be considered. Current best practice in both EU and international environmental law advocates a holistic ecosystem approach to assessment of impacts and risks. The issues of biosecurity and ethics, including the impacts on the stocks of species used as cleaner fish, are areas for inclusion in such a holistic ecosystem assessment. The Drivers, Pressures, State, Impacts, Responses (DPSIR) process is examined as a decision-making framework and potential applications to sea lice management are outlined. It is argued that this is required to underpin any integrated sea lice management (ISLM) strategy to balance pressures and outcomes and ensure a holistic approach to managing the issue of sea lice infestations on farmed stock on a medium to long-term basis.
    • Marine Biotechnology Task Force Report

      Marine Biotechnology Task (Marine Institute, 2017)
      Marine biotechnology is a rapidly growing area that is recognised, by policy makers and the enterprise sector, as offering significant potential to develop market opportunities for new products and processes by enabling greater utilisation of marine biological resources. Current research funding activity, supporting efforts to create a sustainable bioeconomy, is likely to lead to a growth in marine biotechnology research and commercial activities. Irish and international financial support for this research is aimed at as yet largely unexplored and underexploited marine resources for use as food, functional foods and nutraceuticals; cosmetics and cosmeceuticals; human and animal health – including pharmaceuticals, biocompatible materials and medical devices; materials technology; environmental bioremediation; and marine model organisms, including the use of marine derived materials in bioprocessing. Research within these areas has resulted in an array of new products and processes which offer benefits to society and support economic growth. The Marine Institute established a Task Force to advise on the steps required to strengthen Ireland’s capability to use marine biotechnology to exploit the value of its extensive marine bioresources. The Task Force, comprising academic and industry members, considered the various national strategies and plans for science, technology, research and economic development, and identified market opportunity areas and Irish marine biotechnology research capabilities. In supporting the work of the Task Force, the Marine Institute completed a number of information-gathering exercises to fill various knowledge gaps identified by the Task Force. Following the preparation of a draft report, the Task Force, with the support of the Marine Institute, held a workshop attended by researchers and companies. This final report of the Task Force takes account of feedback from this workshop in developing its recommendations.
    • A hydrothermal adventure- Build your own unknown; Fact or fiction student evaluation game.

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      Taking inspiration from the script of Build Your Own Unknown which merges scientific fact with a fictional narrative, play a game of fact or fiction to evaluate student learning. Play the game twice; at the beginning of the module after the students first viewing of Build Your Own Unknown and at the end of the completed module or related lesson plans. Alternatively create a set of questions based on the glossary and use to play fact or fiction. Record results each time and compare statistics to determine the class percentage increase/decrease in learning.
    • English 5th and 6th Class: Marine TV - An investigative report on the marine science survey aboard the RV Celtic Explorer

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for the children to learn how to use key media questions: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How? They will work in groups to write a script where they can play different characters aboard the research vessel, allowing them to work collaboratively and use their imaginations.
    • Science: 5th and 6th Class: Build your own seismometer – learning about forces under the sea

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      Earthquakes occur when parts of the Earth’s crust and upper mantle move suddenly. Large earthquakes can cause catastrophic amounts of damage so it’s very important to be able to predict when they might happen. Earthquakes are detected using a seismometer which detects vibrations in the earth. In class, groups of students can work together to make a simple model of a seismometer to demonstrate how they work. The students will experience working in groups and through a creative process develop skills intrinsic to working scientifically
    • Geography: 5th and 6th Class : Marine explorers and scientists – learning about people and places

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson provides students with an opportunity to learn about people and places in Ireland. With a focus on marine science and seismology, the students will learn about the type of work marine scientists and seismologists are involved with and the environments they work in. This lesson plan can be adapted to follow and study the life of any scientist on a scientific survey. Students can also learn about the people that work on the research vessel, the research vessel RV Celtic Explorer.
    • Geography - The Deep Unknown Presentation

      Marine Institute; Tulca (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The Deep Unknown Presentation is a PowerPoint presentation that helps teachers and primary school students discover the Mid Atlantic Ridge and what lies beneath 3,000kms under the sea. It offers a simple explanation of hydrothermal vents, what they are and how these physical features of our planet form.
    • Science - Creature Features and Chemosynthesis

      Marine Institute; Tulca (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The Creature Features and Chemosynthesis Presentation is a simple PowerPoint presentation about life in the hydrothermal vent ecosystem. The presentation introduces students to some of the unique creatures that live there and how the vents provide energy for them to survive through the process of chemosynthesis.
    • A hydrothermal adVENTure

      Marine Institute; Tulca (Marine Institute, 2018)
    • Visual arts 5th and 6th class: Build your own unknown film set

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson enables students to imagine, design and construct their own film set using recycled materials and papier-mache that is based on the Moytirra hydrothermal vent field. The students will experience working in groups and through a creative process develop skills intrinsic to working scientifically.
    • Visual arts 5th and 6th class: Light and shadow underwater scene

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson enables students to differentiate between transparent, translucent and opaque materials and their different properties against light. Through a process of experimentation and creative play, students will create an underwater shadow scene.
    • Visual arts 5th and 6th class: Print your own hydrothermal vent field

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson enables students to respond to scientific footage about hydrothermal vents and visually interpret their findings through a two-part printmaking process. The students will experiment with colour, line, shape and mark-making techniques to compose a print.
    • Music 5th and 6th class: Make sounds of the unknown through improvisation

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson will enable students to listen, imagine and create their own music, inspired by the discovery of the Moytirra hydrothermal vents. The students will select from a wide variety of sound sources such as voice, body percussion, improvised instruments and technology to generate sounds of the deep ocean, to accompany the storyboard/film.
    • English 5th and 6th Class: Storyboard your own deep sea voyage of discovery

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson introduces students to how stories are developed for film. Students will draft a storyboard for a film imagining they are a team of marine scientists embarking on their own underwater voyage of discovery. They will interpret marine and scientific language and through a combination of the real and the imaginary, develop their own storyboard and film.
    • History: 5th and 6th class. The myth behind the naming of Moytirra - Balor and the Battle of Moy Tura

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson introduces students to the naming of the Moytirra hydrothermal vents in the mid-Atlantic. The students will learn about how the name that was given to the largest hydrothermal vent was inspired by the Irish legend and story about Balor and the Battle of Moy Tura. The students will learn through readings of myths and legends from Irish culture.
    • Science: 5th and 6th class. Experimenting with dissolution

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson allows students to explore the effects of solids in hot and cold liquid by conducting a range of experiments mixing different materials in water solutions.