Now showing items 21-40 of 1716

    • The Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks Nephrops Grounds (FU2021) 2023 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2024

      Doyle, Jennifer; Bentley, K.; Sullivan, Mairead; Opanowski, Artur; Sugrue, S.; Farrell, Ellen; Domingos, Marta; McCorriston, P. (Marine Institute, 2023)
      This report provides the main results of the 2023 underwater television survey on the ‘Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 2021. The 2023 annual survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. A total of 100 UWTV stations were completed at 6 nm intervals over a randomised isometric grid design. The 2023 mean burrow density was 0.104 burrows/m2 compared with 0.101 burrows/m2 in the year 2022. The 2023 geostatistical abundance estimate was 1026 million, a 0.6% decrease on the abundance from 2022, with a CV of 4%, which is well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS 2012. Low to medium densities were observed throughout the ground. Using the 2023 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2024 that correspond to the ICES MSY approach of 1865 tonnes assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2020– 2022. Two species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis and Pennatula phosphorea) were recorded as present at the stations surveyed. Trawl marks were observed at 20% of the stations surveyed.
    • Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne Head Nephrops Grounds (FU17) 2023 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2024

      Aristegui, M.; Ryan, Gráinne; Fahy, James; Manning, Laurence; McCann, Neve; Woodcock, Kirsty; Course, Grant; Meireles de Castro, Rita; Murphy, Natasha; White, Jonathan; et al. (Marine Institute, 2023)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the 21st annual underwater television survey on the Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne head Nephrops grounds, ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 17. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD and other ecosystem data. In 2023 a total of 44 UWTV stations were successfully completed, 34 on the Aran Grounds, 5 on Galway Bay and 5 on Slyne Head patches. The mean burrow density observed in 2023, adjusted for edge effect, was medium at 0.29 burrows/m². The final krigged burrow abundance estimate for the Aran Grounds was 356 million burrows with a CV (Coefficient of Variance; relative standard error) of 3%. The final abundance estimate for Galway Bay was 15 million and for Slyne Head was 5 million, with CVs of 7% and 4% respectively. The total abundance estimates have fluctuated considerably over the time series. The 2023 combined abundance estimate (375 million burrows) is 13% higher than in 2021, and it is below MSY Btrigger (540 million burrows). Using the 2023 estimate of abundance and updated stock data imply that catches in 2024 should be no more than 454 tonnes, according to the EU MAP and ICES MSY approach and assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2020–2022. Virgularia mirabilis was the only sea-pen species observed on the UWTV footage. Trawl marks were present at 5% of the Aran stations surveyed.
    • Porcupine Bank Nephrops Grounds (FU16) 2023 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2024

      Aristegui, M.; Ryan, Gráinne; Fahy, James; Manning, Laurence; McCann, Neve; Woodcock, Kirsty; Course, Grant; Meireles de Castro, Rita; Murphy, Natasha (Marine Institute, 2023)
      This report provides the results of the eleventh underwater television on the ‘Porcupine Bank Nephrops grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 16. The survey was multi disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. In total 71 UWTV stations were successfully completed (100% of the planned stations) in a randomised 6 nautical mile isometric grid covering the full spatial extent of the stock. The mean burrow density observed in 2023, adjusted for edge effect, was 0.27 burrows/m². The final krigged abundance estimate was 2002 million burrows with a CV of 3% and an estimated stock area of 7,130 km2 . The 2023 abundance estimate was 47% higher than in 2022. Using the 2023 estimate of abundance and updated stock data imply that catches in 2024 should be between 3677 and 4560 tonnes, according to the EU MAP and ICES MSY approach (assuming that all catch is landed). Four species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis, Funiculina quadrangularis, Pennatula phosphorea and the deepwater sea-pen Kophobelemnon stelliferum) were observed during the survey. Trawl marks were also observed on 20% of the stations surveyed.
    • Climate Action Roadmap 2023

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2023)
      The 2023 Public Sector Climate Action Mandate will support public sector bodies to lead by example on climate action. It aims to inspire the necessary climate action in wider society to reduce Ireland’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 51% by 2030. The Marine Institute is committed to making every best endeavour to meet the targets of the Climate Action Mandate. The Institute will operate and meet the legal requirements of the Statutory Instruments where relevant & applicable. Many of the governments commitments have already been implemented to some degree by the Marine Institute. We will continue to show leadership in climate action by taking, and reporting on all the actions set out in the Mandate.
    • The Stock Book 2023: Annual Review of Fish Stocks in 2023 with Management Advice for 2024

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2023)
      The Stock Book is the principal annual publication of the Marine Institute's Fisheries Ecosystems Advisory Services (FEAS). Its purpose is to provide the latest impartial scientific advice on the commercially exploited fish stocks of interest to Ireland. The Stock Book is used by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine - (DAFM) at the Total Allowable Catch (TAC) negotiations with the EU in December and throughout the year at fisheries management meetings.
    • Noise modelling and environmental risk assessment of a geophysical survey and its impact on herring and minke whales in Irish coastal waters

      Thomsen, Frank; Ram, Matthias; Chreptowicz, Magda; Nocoń, Marta; Balicka, Irmina (Marine Institute, 2023)
      This study aimed to conduct a summarised risk assessment of the impact of underwater noise generated during a geophysical survey planned in the Celtic Sea on marine mammals and fish. In order to provide representative data on the possible effects on baleen whales and fishes where the swim bladder is involved in hearing (primarily pressure detection), two species were chosen – the common minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and the Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus). Both are important components of the local marine ecosystem. The investigation was conducted via numerical modelling, based on which noise impact ranges and impact areas were derived. The modelling was performed for one location and included two scenarios with different sound sources: 1) sparker, 2) mini airgun. The results showed that both in the case of the minke whale and the herring, the overall impacts from the planned surveys are predicted to be higher if the airgun is used. For the minke whale, the impact ranges were highest for the cumulative TTS, while for herring – behavioural reactions led to largest impact distances. Based on knowledge about the occurrence of the studied species in the survey region and the biological importance of the area to the analysed animals, it was concluded that geophysical surveys should be taken with caution. The use of the sparker instead of the airgun was recommended, along with the application of additional mitigation measures during the survey activities
    • Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic Survey (WESPAS) 09 June –20 July, 20223. FSS Survey Series: 2023/03

      O'Donnell, Ciaran; O’Malley, Michael B.; Mullins, Eugene; Whitefield, Jamie (Marine Institute, 2023)
      The WESPAS survey program is the consolidation of two existing survey programs carried out by FEAS, the Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey, and the boarfish acoustic survey. The Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey has been carried out annually since 2008 and reports on the annual abundance of summer feeding aggregations of herring to the west of Scotland and to the north and west of Ireland from 53°30’N to 58°30’N. The boarfish survey was conducted from 2011 using a chartered fishing vessel and reported the abundance of spawning aggregations of boarfish from 47°N to 57°N. In 2016 both surveys were combined into the WESPAS survey and have been carried out on the RV Celtic Explorer over a 42-day period, providing synoptic coverage of shelf waters from 47°30’N northwards to 58°30’N. Age stratified relative stock abundance estimates of boarfish, herring and horse mackerel within the survey area were calculated using acoustic data and biological data from trawl sampling. Stock estimates of boarfish and horse mackerel were submitted to the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2022. Herring estimates are submitted to the Herring Assessment Working Group (HAWG) meeting in March every year. Survey performance will be reviewed at the ICES Planning Group meeting for International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) meeting in January 2024.
    • Annual Report 2022/Tuarascáil Bhliantúil 2022 (English and Irish/Bilingual versions)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2023)
      The Marine Institute is the national agency for marine research, technology, development and innovation. It seeks to assess and realise the economic potential of Ireland’s marine resource, promote sustainable development of marine industry through strategic funding programmes and essential scientific services, as well as safeguard Ireland’s natural marine resource through research and environmental monitoring. Ireland has a marine area of approximately 880,000 km2 under the sea, which is over 10 times its land area, representing an enormous seabed and marine resource. The Marine Institute promotes the sustainable development of this vast resource through research, the application of new technologies and by providing credible science-based advice to industry, the Government and the EU.
    • TC22_02 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2023-09)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and mapping continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS, which commenced in 1999 under the GSI was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed.
    • TC22_01 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2023-07)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and mapping continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS, which commenced in 1999 under the GSI was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed.
    • CV22_03 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2023-07)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and mapping continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS, which commenced in 1999 under the GSI was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed.
    • CV22_02 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2023-05)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and mapping continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS, which commenced in 1999 under the GSI was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed.
    • Summary of Marine Research Investments from 2017-2022

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2023)
      This overview provides a summary of Irish participation in marine research projects from 2017-2022 using data collected from national research funding bodies participating in the Marine Research Funders’ Forum. The data also includes Irish participation in EU research funding programmes. <br> <br> Click below for the accompanying Marine Research Investments Dashboard (2017-2022).
    • Cruise report: Irish Anglerfish & Megrim Survey 2023

      Kelly, Eoghan; Moore, S.J.; Coleman, Paul; Aristegui Ezquibela; Stokes, David; Ni Chonchuir, G. (Marine Institute, 2023)
      The 2023 Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS) took place from 11th February to 7th March in ICES (International Council Exploration of the Sea) Divisions 7.b-c and 7.j-k, and 14th to 23rd April in ICES Division 6.a on-board the Research Vessel Celtic Explorer. The main objective of the survey was to obtain biomass and abundance indices for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and Lophius budegassa) and megrim (Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis and Lepidorhombus boscii) in ICES Division 6.a (south of 58°N) and Subarea 7 (west of 8°W). Secondary objectives were to collect data on the distribution, relative abundance and biology of other commercially exploited species. For the fifth year, additional sampling took place in deep water (up to 1,500m) in order to monitor the recovery of exploited deep-water species following the decline of the deep-water fisheries in Irish waters since early 2000s (Kelly and Gerritsen, 2022). This work was funded under Marine Biodiversity Schemes of the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) from 2019 to 2021 and European Maritime, Fisheries and Aquaculture Fund (EMFAF) since 2022. The IAMS survey is coordinated with the Scottish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (SIAMISS) as part of ICES International Bottom Trawl Survey Working Group (IBTSWG) and uses the same gear and fishing practices.
    • Atlantic Herring in 6aS/7b, Industry Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, November-December 2022

      O’Malley, M.; Mullins, Eugene; Nolan, Cormac (Marine Institute, 2023)
      An acoustic survey of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus was conducted in ICES areas 6aS/7b in November/December 2022 and January 2023. The 2022 survey was conducted using five vessels; MFVs Crystal Dawn WD201, Ros Ard SO745, Girl Kate SO427, Johnny G S653 (d) and Conquest SO852. The 6aS/7b survey design in 2022 focused on 6 core areas with prior knowledge of herring distribution from previous surveys and the monitoring fishery were targeted for surveying. The change in survey design since 2020 was largely based on the results from ICES WKHASS (ICES 2020) and from lessons learned in the previous surveys in this area from 2016-2019. This design resulted in a much reduced survey area compared to previous years, but with better coverage of most of the important inshore bays where the monitoring fishery takes place. The survey design objective remained the same; to capture the distribution of winter spawning herring in the 6aS/7b area, but this design was not expected to achieve overall stock containment. The timing of surveys in the core areas was flexible from the outset by design. The greater flexibility allows for a targeted spatial and temporal approach which avoided the inevitable poor weather that can happen in this area during this time of the year and which led to reduced survey effort in some previous years. Using smaller vessels allowed surveys to be conducted in shallow inshore areas where herring are known to aggregate during this time of the year. This survey is the seventh consecutive annual acoustic survey for pre-spawning herring in this area at this time of the year. A pole-mounted system with a combi 38 kHz (split) 200 kHz (single) transducer was used successfully for the survey on small vessels (<18m) in 2022. Herring were again distributed inshore in shallow areas, and the improved survey design and use of small vessels for the survey resulted in a good measure of uncertainty (CV =0.25). The stock was not overall contained in 2022, particularly in the Donegal Bay area (Malin Beg, etc.) and more effort is required to target surveys earlier and later than December and January when herring tend to show up in these areas in difficult to predict patterns. Very strong herring marks were evident in Lough Foyle and Lough Swilly in the channel in marks that extended for many miles in some cases. This was in areas where smaller boats in the fishery were concentrating effort. Herring had left the Swilly and Foyle by mid-February. There was also a series of strong herring marks in Bruckless Bay, Fintra Bay and Inver Bay in discreet areas, particularly in December. The monitoring fishery was being conducted on smaller boats in the same areas and close to the same time as the survey and biological samples from some of these vessels were used. There was a fairly tight distribution of length classes in all hauls, with most hauls dominated by larger (> 22 cm) mature fish. The 2- and 3-wr age class of herring accounted for 72% of the overall numbers in 2022. The total stock biomass (TSB) estimate of 54,046 tonnes is considered to be a minimum estimate of herring in the 6aS/7b survey area at the time of the survey. The 2022 estimate is the highest estimate in the time series. The flexible survey design and focusing on discreet areas was generally successful and is providing a good template for future survey designs.
    • International Blue Whiting Spawning Stock Survey (IBWSS) Spring 2023

      Marine Institute; Wageningen Marine Research; Institute of Marine Research; Faroe Marine Research Institute; Danish Institute for Fisheries Research; Spanish Institute of Oceanography (Marine Institute, 2023)
      Coordination of the survey was initiated at the meeting of the Working Group on International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) in January 2023 and continued by correspondence until the start of the survey. During the survey, effort was refined and adjusted by the survey coordinator (Norway) using real time observations.
    • National Survey Of Sea Lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis Krøyer and Caligus elongatus Nordmann) on Fish Farms in Ireland – 2022

      D'Arcy, J.; Kelly, Suzanne; McDermott, Tom; Kane, F.; Casserly, Joanne; Power, Ayesha; O'Donohoe, P.; Ruane, Neil M. (Marine Institute, 2023)
      Farmed stocks of Atlantic salmon in Ireland are inspected on 14 occasions throughout the year to monitor sea lice levels as part of a national programme. Sea lice are a naturally occurring parasite found on marine fish, including salmonids. They are small ecto-parasitic copepod crustaceans and there are approximately 559 species. The objectives of the National Sea Lice Monitoring Programme are: *To provide an objective measurement of infestation levels on farms. * To investigate the nature of infestations. * To provide management information to drive the implementation of control and management strategies. * To facilitate further development and refinement of this strategy. The sea lice control and management strategy has five principal components: * Separation of generations. * Annual fallowing of sites. * Early harvest of two-sea-winter fish. * Targeted treatment regimes, including synchronous treatments. * Agreed husbandry practices.
    • Fish Health Unit Report of Activities Undertaken in 2022

      Doré, B.; Kenny, E.; Bradley, F.; O’ Kane, Patricia; Clancy, Joshua; Farragher, E.; Cheslett, D.; White, S.; Griffin, Bogna (Marine Institute, 2023)
      This report summarises the activities undertaken by the Fish Health Unit of the Marine Institute in 2022. Regulation (EU) 2016/429 lays down the rules for the prevention and control of animal diseases which are transmissible to animal or humans and the Marine Institute is the Competent Authority responsible for implementation of this regulation in Ireland. The purpose of this report is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the operations of the Marine Institute in fish health, and the findings encountered by the Fish Health Unit in 2022.
    • Chapter 10: Marine Infrastructures & Programmes for Essential Ocean Variables Monitoring

      Berry, Alan; Donnelly, Felicity; Cusack, Caroline K.; Fitzhenry, Deirdre; Nolan, Glenn (Marine Institute, 2023)