Now showing items 1-20 of 1556

    • The Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks Nephrops Grounds (FU2021) 2021 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2022.

      Doyle, Jennifer; Ryan, G.; Aristegui, M.; Fitzgerald, Ross; Tully, D.; O'Brien, S.; White, Jonathan; Sullivan, M.; Lynch, Deirdre; McAuliffe, M (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This report provides the main results of the 2021 underwater television survey on the ‘Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 2021. The 2021 survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. A total of 97 UWTV stations were completed at 6 nm intervals over a randomised isometric grid design. The mean burrow density was 0.12 burrows/m2 compared with 0.102 burrows/m2 in 2020. The 2021 geostatistical abundance estimate was 1202 million, a 18% increase on the abundance from 2020, with a CV of 5%, which is well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS 2012. Low to medium densities were observed throughout the ground. Using the 2021 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2022 that correspond to the ICES MSY approach of 1978 tonnes assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2018–2020. One species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis) were recorded as present at the stations surveyed. Trawl marks were observed at 21% of the stations surveyed.
    • The “Smalls” Nephrops Grounds (FU22) 2021 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2022

      Aristegui, M.; Fitzgerald, Ross; Lynch, Deirdre; White, Jonathan; Doyle, Jennifer; McAuliffe, M (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the sixteenth annual underwater television survey on the ‘Smalls grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 22. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. A total of 42 UWTV stations were surveyed successfully (high quality image data), carried out over an isometric grid at 4.5nmi or 8.3km intervals. The precision, with a CV of 7%, was well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS (ICES, 2012). The 2021 abundance estimate was 13% lower than in 2020 and at 656 million is below the MSY Btrigger reference point (990 million). Using the 2021 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2022 that correspond to the ICES MSY approach of 1257 tonnes assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2018–2020. One species of sea pen was recorded as present at the stations surveyed: Virgularia mirabilis. Trawl marks were observed at 24% of the stations surveyed.
    • FU19 Nephrops Grounds 2021 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2022

      Doyle, Jennifer; Ryan, G; Aristegui, M.; Fitzgerald, Ross; Tully, D.; O’Brien, S.; White, Jonathan; Sullivan, M.; Lynch, Deirdre; McAuliffe, M (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This report provides the main results of the twelfth underwater television survey of the various Nephrops patches in Functional Unit 19. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. In 2021 a total 42 UWTV stations were successfully completed. The mean density estimates varied considerably across the different patches. The 2021 raised abundance estimate was a 16% decrease from the 2020 estimate and at 270 million burrows is below the MSY Btrigger reference point (430 million). Using the 2021 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2022 that correspond to the F ranges in the EU multi annual plan for Western Waters are between 363 and 407 tonnes (assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2018–2020). One species of sea pen were observed; Virgularia mirabilis which has been observed on previous surveys of FU19. Trawl marks were observed at 19% of the stations surveyed.
    • Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne Head Nephrops Grounds (FU17) 2021UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2022

      Aristegui, M.; Doyle, J.; Ryan, G.; Fitzgerald, R.; White, Jonathan; O’ Brien, S.; Tully, D.; Sullivan, M. (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the twentieth annual underwater television survey on the Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne head Nephrops grounds, ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 17. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD and other ecosystem data. In 2021 a total of 44 UWTV stations were successfully completed, 34 on the Aran Grounds, 5 on Galway Bay and 5 on Slyne Head patches. The mean burrow density observed in 2021, adjusted for edge effect, was medium at 0.26 burrows/m². The final krigged burrow abundance estimate for the Aran Grounds was 311 million burrows with a CV (Coefficient of Variance; relative standard error) of 4%. The final abundance estimate for Galway Bay was 12 million and for Slyne Head was 9 million, with CVs of 2% and 2% respectively. The total abundance estimates have fluctuated considerably over the time series. The 2021 combined abundance estimate (331 million burrows) is 16% lower than in 2020, the MSY Btrigger reference and it is below point (540 million burrows). Using the 2021 estimate of abundance and updated stock data imply that catches in 2022 should be no more than 360 tonnes, according to the EU MAP and ICES MSY approach and assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2018–2020. Virgularia mirabilis was the only sea-pen species observed on the UWTV footage. Trawl marks were present at 5% of the Aran stations surveyed.
    • Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic Survey (WESPAS), 09 June –20 July, 2021

      O’Donnell, Ciaran; O’Malley, M.; Mullins, E; Connaughton, P.; Keogh, Niall; judge, Justin; Croot, P. (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The WESPAS survey program is the consolidation of two existing survey programs carried out by FEAS, the Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey, and the boarfish acoustic survey. The Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey has been carried out annually since 2008 and reports on the annual abundance of summer feeding aggregations of herring to the west of Scotland and to the north and west of Ireland from 53°30’N to 58°30’N. The boarfish survey was conducted from 2011 using a chartered fishing vessel and reported the abundance of spawning aggregations of boarfish from 47°N to 57°N. In 2016 both surveys were combined into the WESPAS survey and have been carried out onboard the RV Celtic Explorer over a 42-day period, providing synoptic coverage of shelf waters from 47°30’N northwards to 58°30’N. Age stratified relative stock abundance estimates of boarfish, herring and horse mackerel within the survey area were calculated using acoustic data and biological data from trawl sampling. Stock estimates of boarfish and horse mackerel were submitted to the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2021. Herring estimates are submitted to the Herring Assessment Working Group (HAWG) meeting in March every year. Survey performance will be reviewed at the ICES Planning Group meeting for International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) meeting in January 2022.
    • Annual Report 2020

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2021)
    • Porcupine Bank Nephrops Grounds (FU16) 2021 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2022

      Aristegui, M.; Blaszkowski, M.; Doyle, Jennifer; O'Brien, S.; Hehir, Imelda; Bentley, K.; Fitzgerald, Ross (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This report provides the results of the ninth underwater television on the ‘Porcupine Bank Nephrops grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 16. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. In total 71 UWTV stations were successfully completed in a randomised 6 nautical mile isometric grid covering the full spatial extent of the stock. The mean burrow density observed in 2021, adjusted for edge effect, was 0.14 burrows/m². The final krigged abundance estimate was 1018 million burrows with a CV of 5% and an estimated stock area of 7,130 km2. The 2021 abundance estimate was 19% lower than in 2020. Using the 2021 estimate of abundance and updated stock data imply that catches in 2022 should be no more than 2804 tonnes, according to the EU MAP and ICES MSY approach (assuming that all catch is landed). Four species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis, Funiculina quadrangularis, Pennatula phosphorea and the deepwater sea-pen Kophobelemnon stelliferum) were observed during the survey. Trawl marks were also observed on 38% of the stations surveyed.
    • Fish Health Unit Report of Activities Undertaken in 2020

      Doré, B.; Power, Ayesha; Kenny, E.; Bradley, F.; O’ Kane, Patricia; Cheslett, D.; White, S.; Swords, Fiona (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This report summarises the activities undertaken by the Fish Health Unit (FHU) of the Marine Institute (MI) in 2020. The services of the FHU, undertaken on behalf of the State, are largely driven by European and national legislation on aquatic animal health. In 2020, animal health requirements for aquaculture animals and rules for the control of aquatic animal health within the European Union (EU) was determined in Council Directive 2006/88/EC on animal health requirements for aquaculture animals lays down rules for the control of aquatic animal health within the EU. Council Directive 2006/88/EC was enacted in Irish Law by Statutory Instrument (SI) 261 of 2008. New Animal Health Law, Regulation (EU) 2016/429 and associated implementing regulations, replaced the regulatory framework provided by Directive 2006/88/EC in April 2021. However, this report covers FHU activities carried out in 2020 under Directive 2006/88/EC and associated national legislation. The MI is the Competent Authority (CA) responsible for implementation of aquatic animal health regulation in Ireland as described in these statutes.
    • Explorers Shark Species from Around the World Poster

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2020)
      The Explorers Shark Species from Around the World Poster provides illustrations of over twenty sharks found in the ocean around the world. Information about the sharks includes the adult shark length, weight and life expectancy.
    • Explorers Five Turtle Species that Visit Irish Waters Poster

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Five Turtle Species that Visit Irish Waters poster provides a collection of illustrations of the turtles that migrate across the Atlantic and are found in the ocean waters around Ireland. This includes the Leatherback Sea Turtle, Loggerhead Sea Turtle, Green Sea Turtle, Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle, and the Hawksbill Sea Turtle. The poster also includes details of the common name, scientific name, size, weight and the life span of each of the turtles.
    • Explorers Exploring Our Ocean Poster

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Joyce, John (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The Exploring Our Ocean poster represents our interconnection with the ocean. It includes a collage of fun cartoon characters featuring the Marine Institute’s research vessel and marine scientists, marine industry, shipping, and recreation, as well as different types of technology we use to monitor the ocean.
    • Explorers Ocean Depths Poster

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The Ocean Depths Poster provides an illustration of the ocean zones. This includes the Sunlight (0 – 200m); Twilight (200 – 1000m); Midnight (1000 – 4000m); Abyssal (4000 – 6000m); Trenches (6000 – 11,000m). The poster also provides images and interesting facts about typical animals found at each level of the ocean. It also highlights a number of discoveries in the Atlantic Ocean that have been made by the Marine Institute, as well as other international discoveries around the world.
    • Explorers 500 Years of Climate Change Poster

      Gorick, Glynn; Dromgool Regan, Cushla; Gorick, Glynn (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The 500 years of Climate Change poster is an excellent poster to demonstrate how the ocean has changed since Ferdinand Magellan undertook the first navigation and recordings of the ocean in 1519-1522. The poster graphic shows the correlation of how with the increase of the world population in the last 500 years, there is also been an increases in: Co2 levels in the ocean, ocean temperatures, sea level rising, ocean acidification, and marine litter. The poster also illustrates the decrease in the size of the artic polar cap and the stocks of large predatory fish. The poster also shows the methods for taking measurements of the ocean. The poster illustration was created by Glynn Gorick, Flanders Marine Institute, VLIZ and the H2020 ‘Sea Change’ Ocean Literacy Project. The poster may be used with teaching children about climate change as illustrates the importance of understanding human impact on the ocean and climate change (SDG 13). The poster can be used for presentations to generate ideas for class discussion. It may also be printed and used as a visual display in the classroom, to help raise awareness, knowledge and engagement in conversations about our ocean.
    • Explorers Learning about Squid: Our favourite Squid Facts

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Burke, Noirin; McCrea, Mona; Varian, Sarah; Larkin, Eithne; Peritz, Atalya; Murphy, Rebecca; McMahon, Eoin; Kennedy, Sorsha; O'Connor, Bríd; et al. (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Learning about Squid: Explorers Learning about Squid: Our favourite SQUID FACTS includes 20 of the Explorers outreach teams favourite facts about squid. These can be used as a presentation within the class to generate ideas for class discussion, stories, and to help children create their own favourite squid facts. The squid fact images may also be printed and used as part of an Explorers Learning about Squid visual display in the classroom. The Explorers team facts were created by: Cushla Dromgool-Regan, Noirín Burke, Mona McCrea, Sarah Varian, Eithne Larkin, Atalya Peritz, Rebecca Murphy, Eoin McMahon, Sorsha Kennedy, Bríd O'Connor, Padraic Creedon, William McElhinney, Shazia Waheed, Mervyn Horgan, Jai Tuohy.
    • Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore Poster

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore Poster includes forty photographs of animals that are typically found on the Irish seashore. Each of the animals are listed under their species headings including: Seashells • Sliogáin; Fish • Éisc; Crustacean • Crústaigh; Jellies, Anemones and Corals • Smugaurlí, Bundúin agus Coiréalaigh; Sponges and Squirts • Spúinsí agus Ascaidí; Stars and Urchins • Crosóga agus Cuáin; and Worms • Péisteanna. Each photo also includes the animals common and Irish names.
    • Explorers The Real Map of Ireland Poster and Activity sheet

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; O'Driscoll, Deirdre (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The Explorers Real Map of Ireland Poster and Activity sheet is double-sided and includes an illustration of Ireland’s marine territory on one side and activities on the other. Ireland’s ocean territory is ten times the size of the island of Ireland. The currently designated Irish Continental Shelf, represented by the red line on the map, shows the Republic of Ireland's current territorial waters, which extends out across the North Atlantic Ocean and includes parts of the Irish and Celtic Seas. This area includes one of the largest marine Exclusive Economic Zones in the European Union. The activity sheet on the back includes a word-find and word-jumble, where children can learn the names of the areas of the ocean. It also includes an art activity, drawing the Marine Institute’s research vessels that are used for seabed mapping in Ireland.
    • Explorers Learning about Squid: KRAKEN the Sea Monster Presentation

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Crowley, Danielle; Manning, Eimear (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Learning about Squid: KRAKEN the Sea Monster Presentation provides a series of fun facts that used to discuss the history, myths and stories of the giant squid. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard. The presentation includes lots of images that portray the Kraken in many guises. Photographs and images are Istock as well as Alamy. This PowerPoint may be used for educational purposes and the images must retain all of their image copyright details.
    • Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: My Squid Workbook

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear; Quinn, Anna (Marine Institute, 2021)
      Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: My Squid Workbook, is an accompanying workbook to the books- CSI Squid for Beginners and CSI Our Favourite Squid Species. Learning about animals such as squid, help us discover some of the amazing things about marine biodiversity and adaptation; as well as exploring the ocean around the world.
    • Atlantic Herring in 6aS/7b, Industry Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, November-December 2020 and January 2021.

      O'Malley, M.; Mullins, Eugene; Nolan, Cormac (Marine Institute, 2021)
      An acoustic survey of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus was conducted in ICES areas 6aS/7b in November-December 2020 and January 2021. The 2020 survey was conducted using five vessels; MFVs Crystal Dawn WD201, Ros Ard SO745, Johnny G S653, Abigail S SO354, and St. Catherine D299. The 6aS/7b survey design changed in 2020 compared with previous years in that only 6 core areas with prior knowledge of herring distribution from the monitoring fishery were targeted for surveying. This was largely based on the results from ICES WKHASS (ICES 2020) and from lessons learned in the previous surveys in this area from 2016-2019. This design resulted in a much reduced survey area compared to previous years, but with better coverage of most of the important inshore bays where the monitoring fishery takes place. The survey design objective remained the same; to capture the distribution of winter spawning herring in the 6aS/7b area, but this design was not expected to achieve overall stock containment. The timing of surveys in the core areas was flexible from the outset by design. It was decided that greater flexibility would allow for a targeted spatial and temporal approach which avoided the inevitable poor weather that can happen in this area during this time of the year and which lead to reduced survey effort in previous years. Using smaller vessels allowed surveys to be conducted in shallow inshore areas where herring are known to aggregate during this time of the year. This survey is the fifth consecutive annual acoustic survey for herring in this area at this time of the year. A pole-mounted system with a combi 38 kHz (split) 200 kHz (single) transducer was used successfully for the survey on small vessels (<18m) in 2020. Herring were again distributed inshore in shallow areas, and the improved survey design and use of small vessels for the survey resulted in a good measure of uncertainty (CV). The stock was not overall contained in 2020, particularly in the Donegal Bay area (Bruckless, Inver Bays, etc.) and more effort is required to target survey effort later in December and January when herring appear to show up in these areas in greater numbers. The COVID pandemic affected the ability to conduct surveys in late December. Very strong herring marks were evident in Lough Foyle and Lough Swilly in the channel in marks that extended for many miles. This was in areas where smaller boats in the fishery were concentrating effort. There was also a series of herring marks in Bruckless Bay, Fintra Bay and Inver Bay in discreet areas. There were a few small herring marks in the Achill strata. The monitoring fishery was being conducted on smaller boats in the same areas and close to the same time as the survey and biological samples from some of these vessels were used. There was a wide distribution of length classes in all hauls, with most hauls dominated by larger (> 22 cm) mature fish. The 2- and 3-wr age class of herring accounted for 54% of the overall numbers in 2020. The total stock biomass (TSB) estimate of 45,046 tonnes is considered to be a minimum estimate of herring in the 6aS/7b survey area at the time of the survey. The flexible survey design and focusing on discreet areas was generally successful and should provide a template for future survey designs.
    • Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: Squid For Beginners

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear; Quinn, Anna (Marine Institute, 2021)
      Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: SQUID FOR BEGINNERS provides an introduction to squid for children and teachers to use in the classroom and aims to inspire a new generation of explorers. The book introduces children to science classification and the names given to squid; cephalopod evolution; and where squid are distributed and their different habitats. The book also has a section about a squids anatomy and supports the Explorers Learning about Squid Film Cephalopod Science Investigations: Squid Dissection & Fun Facts, where the special features of squid are discussed. A chapter is also dedicated to the Kraken and highlights how the giant squid has been introduced into many cultures, over hundreds of years as a giant sea monster. The book also shows our connections with squid from yummy ‘squidulicious’ food, fishing, climate change to squid in museums and sculptures. Finally, the book also highlights how squid features are influencing science, technology and engineering.