Now showing items 1-20 of 1635

    • Catch and bycatch in the tangle net fishery for crayfish (Palinurus elephas) off the south west coast of Ireland

      Tully, Oliver; Palma-Pedraza, S. (Marine Institute, 2022)
      Crayfish or spiny lobster is fished off the south west coast of Ireland. There are also smaller fisheries on the west and north west coasts. Although historically, prior to the 1970s, the main fishing gear used in the fishery was top entrance traps crayfish are now targeted with large mesh tangle nets. The selectivity of these nets is poor and there is known to be a by-catch of finfish, skates and rays and protected species such as grey seal. The fishery usually occurs from mid-March to December. The species composition and size distribution of the catch and by-catch was surveyed over a 4 year period from 2017-2020 from Dingle Bay north to the Shannon Estuary. Additional data south of this area was obtained in 2020. A crayfish tagging programme was undertaken in 2017 and 2018. Between 2 and 6 vessels participated in the programme depending on year Most of the data was reported directly by Skippers and crew who were contracted to supply data. Scientific observers covered a proportion of trips in 2017 and 2019. A total of 1500 nmiles of tangle net hauls were surveyed across 6 vessels. A total of 11792 crayfish and 899 lobsters were measured, 1234 crayfish were tagged and released and 45 recaptures were reported. Spider crab, brown crab and crayfish were the numerically dominant species in the catch. Lobster, pollack, thornback ray, spurdog, monkfish and turbot were caught regularly in low numbers. There was no cetacean by-catch. A total of 200 grey seals were caught over the 4 year period by the vessels participating in the survey. Endangered and critically endangered species, including flapper skate, common skate, angel shark and white skate, were caught in very low numbers. The finfish catch is mainly lost to scavengers or seal depredation before nets are retrieved and because of long soak times which averaged 8 days. This reduces the value of the catch. The average value of the live crustacean (crayfish, lobster, brown crab) catch was approximately €300 per mile of net hauled. Crayfish were tagged and released in 2017 and 2018 and recaptured during the period 2017-2020. Three crayfish tagged by IFREMER off Brittany in 2015 and 2016 were recaptured off the south west and west coast of Ireland in 2019. The northern most recapture was off Erris Head Co. Mayo. The tagging data shows that most crayfish were recaptured locally close to release points even in the years following tagging. It is still unclear if crayfish are resident or if they migrate in and out of the tagging area as the reporting rate of recaptures outside the tagging area is unknown. The by-catch of critically endangered species poses a high risk to the continued presence of these species in Irish waters and indeed in European waters given that the area is known to hold the last European remnant populations of species such as angel shark and white skate. Grey seal by-catch was related to the distance between the fishing event and the nearest seal colony haul out at the Blasket Islands. Sixty % of seals were caught within 10km of the haul out. The probability of capture in a single net haul declined from 30-35% within 10km to 9-14% at distances of 10-30km to 4% at distances of 40-60km and zero at distances greater than 60km (data for 39 hauls >60km). The high by-catch of grey seal is a significant risk to the Blasket Island seal colony. It is unlikelythat the Blasket population can sustain this level of by-catch mortality without inward migration fromother colonies.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 19

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Marine Institute, 2022)
    • The Biologically Sensitive Area: A review of the basis and effectiveness

      APEM (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Biologically Sensitive Area (BSA) designation is a multiuse area of protection to the south and west of Ireland. The BSA was established within a political context based on three core ideas, namely: (1) to prevent overfishing, (2) protect hake stocks and (3) protect spawning and nursery areas found in this area. The area was established in 2003 to limit fishing within the area, and replaced the previous larger ‘Irish Box’ which had surrounded Ireland.
    • Ireland’s Ocean Economy, 2022

      Norton, Daniel; Hynes, Stephen; O'Leary, Jenny; O'Donoghue, Cathal; Tsakiridis, Andreas; Lanser, Marie-Christin (Marine Institute, 2022)
      This report provides an update on Ireland’s ocean economy across three main economic indicators: turnover, gross value added (GVA) and employment, and provides an analysis of trends over the last five years. The report also reviews demographic change in Ireland’s coastal economy, as well as highlighting developments in marine natural capital accounting. The economic trends are presented in the context of key drivers (e.g. policy, legislative, geo-political) that are directly or indirectly impacting on the performance of the ocean economy industries currently and possibly impacting into the future. This report is the sixth in the ocean economy series2. The methodology used in compiling this report builds on previous reports allowing for a complete and comparable representation of Ireland’s ocean economy across all industries. The reference year for the data is primarily 2020 (based on best available data), with estimates based on economic projections of Ireland’s ocean economy up to 2021 also provided. These estimates are based on a forecasting exercise that combines the latest published economic data from the CSO, BIM, government economic forecasts, information and data obtained from surveys with marine-related businesses, and insights from government departments and agencies.
    • Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic Survey (WESPAS) 14 June –24 July, 2022. FSS Survey Series: 2022/03

      O'Donnell, Ciaran; O’Malley, Michael B.; Mullins, Eugene; Power, John; judge, Justin; Croot, P. (Marine Institute, 2022)
      The WESPAS survey program is the consolidation of two existing survey programs carried out by FEAS, the Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey, and the boarfish acoustic survey. The Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey has been carried out annually since 2008 and reports on the annual abundance of summer feeding aggregations of herring to the west of Scotland and to the north and west of Ireland from 53°30’N to 58°30’N. The boarfish survey was conducted from 2011 using a chartered fishing vessel and reported the abundance of spawning aggregations of boarfish from 47°N to 57°N. In 2016 both surveys were combined into the WESPAS survey and have been carried out onboard the RV Celtic Explorer over a 42-day period, providing synoptic coverage of shelf waters from 47°30’N northwards to 58°30’N. Age stratified relative stock abundance estimates of boarfish, herring and horse mackerel within the survey area were calculated using acoustic data and biological data from trawl sampling. Stock estimates of boarfish and horse mackerel were submitted to the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2022. Herring estimates are submitted to the Herring Assessment Working Group (HAWG) meeting in March every year. Survey performance will be reviewed at the ICES Planning Group meeting for International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) meeting in January 2023.
    • The Stock Book 2022: Annual Review of Fish Stocks in 2022 with Management Advice for 2023

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
      The Stock Book is the principal annual publication of the Marine Institute's Fisheries Ecosystems Advisory Services (FEAS). Its purpose is to provide the latest impartial scientific advice on the commercially exploited fish stocks of interest to Ireland. The Stock Book is used by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine - (DAFM) at the Total Allowable Catch (TAC) negotiations with the EU in December and throughout the year at fisheries management meetings.
    • Baseline study of Essential Ocean Variable monitoring in Irish waters; current measurement programmes & data quality

      Nolan, Glenn; Cusack, C.; Fitzhenry, Deirdre; McGovern, Evin; Cronin, Margot; O'Donnell, Garvan; O'Dowd, Leonie; Clarke, M; Reid, D.G.; Clarke, Dave; et al. (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This report provides an initial assessment of Ireland’s current measurement programmes and capacity for Essential Ocean Variables (EOV) data collection. These are typically programmes that involve physical sampling of the marine environment, using a combination of ship-based measurements, fixed platforms e.g. tide and wave gauges, offshore buoys, autonomous platforms e.g. underwater gliders, and conventional collection of physical samples that are analysed on board ships or in shore-based laboratories. Systematic measurement of essential ocean variables underpins the delivery of services to government and the public in terms of real-time decision support, assessments of ocean health e.g. Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), Oslo & Paris Conventions (OSPAR), International Council on the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and long-term observations to inform policy on marine climate change and provide climate information to guide related adaptation measures required under climate change sectoral adaptation plans e.g. seafood sector, transport, biodiversity, and built heritage.
    • LESSON PLAN GEOGRAPHY: Title: Observing the Weather from the Ocean – Buoy oh Buoy Weather Observations

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
      The aim of the lesson plans and activities is to help children develop their geographical investigating skills relating to weather observation. The lesson plans and work sheets are cross curricular covering geography, english and art. They are suited for 4th – 6th Class. Learn about the weather buoy network that monitor the weather in Ireland. This lesson plan includes three activity sheets, including a collage template.
    • Lesson Plan Geography: Observing the Weather

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
      The aim of the lesson plans and activities is to help children develop their geographical investigating skills relating to weather observation. The lesson plans and work sheets are cross curricular covering geography, english and art. They are suited for 4th – 6th Class. In these activities, children will make weather badges, learn about Irish weather, and weather around the world, including the influence the ocean currents have on it. This lesson plan has four worksheets involved.
    • S.P.H.E Lesson Plan: Understanding the Effects of Climate Change

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2022)
      In this lesson plan, children will learn about the different impacts climate change has on different regions. They will learn how it is affecting the ocean and how this impacts people around the world through research, as well as what people around the world are doing to combat it. This lesson is suitable for 5th to 6th Class.
    • S.P.H.E Lesson Plan: Developing the 9 Rs for the Ocean

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2022)
      Through this lesson plan, children learn more about the impacts of climate change on humans and the ocean, and how these are linked. By doing a survey and creating a poster on the 9 R’s, the children will decide on positive actions they and their communities can do to lesson the impact of climate change. This lesson is suitable for 4th to 6th Class.
    • S.P.H.E Lesson: All About Me and the Sea

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2022)
      In this lesson plan, children develop their ideas about who they are and what they value, and how this links to them caring for the environment and the ocean. The children will use photos and images to create a portfolio highlighting what they love about the ocean. This lesson plan includes a work sheet and is suitable for 3rd to 6th Class
    • The Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks Nephrops Grounds (FU2021) 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

      Doyle, Jennifer; Aristegui, M.; Sullivan, M.; O’Connor, Sean; Kinneen, Michael; Sugrue, S.; Derbyshire, Cian; Ryan, G; Bentley, K.; Graham, Jessica; et al. (Marine Institute, 2022)
      This report provides the main results of the 2022 underwater television survey on the ‘Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 2021. The 2022 annual survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. A total of 92 UWTV stations were completed at 6 nm intervals over a randomised isometric grid design. The mean burrow density was 0.10 burrows/m2 compared with 0.12 burrows/m2 in the year 2021. The 2022 geostatistical abundance estimate was 1032 million, a 14% decrease on the abundance from 2021, with a CV of 5%, which is well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS 2012. Low to medium densities were observed throughout the ground. Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2023 that correspond to the ICES MSY approach of 1803 tonnes assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2019–2021. One species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis) was recorded as present at the stations surveyed. Trawl marks were observed at 20% of the stations surveyed.
    • The “Smalls” Nephrops Grounds (FU22) 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

      Doyle, Jennifer; Aristegui, M.; O’Connor, Sean; Sullivan, M.; Kinneen, Michael; Sugrue, S.; Derbyshire, Cian (Marine Institute, 2022)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the seventeenth annual underwater television survey on the ‘Smalls grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 22. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. A total of 42 UWTV stations were surveyed successfully (high quality image data), carried out over an isometric grid at 4.5nmi or 8.3km intervals. The precision, with a CV of 7%, was well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS (ICES, 2012). The 2022 abundance estimate was 36% higher than in 2022 and at 895 million is below the MSY Btrigger reference point (990 million). Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2023 that correspond to the ICES MSY approach of 2548 tonnes, assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2019 - 2021. One species of sea pen was recorded as present at the stations surveyed: Virgularia mirabilis. Trawl marks were observed at 29% of the stations surveyed.
    • Creative Writing – Planning an Ocean Superhero Story

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for the children to use their imagination and create a story about a super-hero that needs the children’s help with solving problems that climate change is causing around the world (e.g. effects on the animals in the ocean etc). The planning session and sheets will provide the children the skills to brainstorm and develop their ideas about a superhero, the super heroes super-powers and how the children can work together to care for our ocean. This lesson is suitable for 4th to 6th Class and includes a story planning sheet (separate document).
    • FU19 Nephrops Grounds 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

      Doyle, Jennifer; Aristegui, M.; Ryan, G.; Bentley, K.; Graham, Jessica; Oliver, Patrick; O’Brien, Betty; Sullivan, M.; O’Connor, Sean; Kinneen, Michael; et al. (Marine Institute, 2022)
      This report provides the main results of the twelfth underwater television survey of the various Nephrops patches in Functional Unit 19. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. In 2022 a total 42 UWTV stations were successfully completed. The mean density estimates varied considerably across the different patches. The 2022 raised abundance estimate showed a 4% decrease from the 2021 estimate and at 259 million burrows is below the MSY Btrigger reference point (430 million). Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2023 that correspond to the F ranges in the EU multi annual plan for Western Waters are between 302 and 338 tonnes (assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2019–2021). One species of sea pen was observed; Virgularia mirabilis which has been observed on previous surveys of FU19. Trawl marks were observed at 12% of the stations surveyed.
    • Porcupine Bank Nephrops Grounds (FU16) 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

      Aristegui, M.; Doyle, Jennifer; Blaszkowski, M; Harvey, Jessica; O’Connor, Sean; Perez Tadeo, M.; Tangye, Tom; De Vos, Ennis; White, Jonathan (Marine Institute, 2022)
      This report provides the results of the tenth underwater television on the ‘Porcupine Bank Nephrops grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 16. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. In total 58 UWTV stations were successfully completed out of the 68 stations planned in a randomised 6 nautical mile isometric grid covering the full spatial extent of the stock. The mean burrow density observed in 2022, adjusted for edge effect, was 0.19 burrows/m². The final krigged abundance estimate was 1363 million burrows with a CV of 3% and an estimated stock area of 7,124 km2. The 2022 abundance estimate was 34% higher than in 2021. Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data imply that catches in 2023 should be between 3054 and 3787 tonnes, according to the EU MAP and ICES MSY approach (assuming that all catch is landed). Three species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis, Funiculina quadrangularis and the deepwater sea-pen Kophobelemnon stelliferum) were observed during the survey. Trawl marks were also observed on 52% of the stations surveyed.
    • CV21_03 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2022)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore.
    • CE21_01 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2022)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore.
    • CV21_02 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2022)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore.