Now showing items 1-20 of 1519

    • Ocean Citizen Survey: Perceptions of the Irish public on priorities for the protection and sustainable use of the ocean

      French, Veronica; McDonough, N (Marine Institute, 2020)
      The European Union (EU) has a bold and ambitious aspiration to restore European marine and freshwater ecosystems by 2030, by reducing human pressures on marine and freshwater environments, restoring degraded ecosystems and sustainably harnessing the essential goods and services they provide. A group of top EU experts have put forward an ambitious proposal for a “Mission Starfish”. This major flagship ‘mission’ for healthy ocean, seas, coastal and inland waters is to be funded by the EU under the forthcoming Horizon Europe Framework Programme (2021-2027) and will also need to be supported by other EU, national and regional funding programmes. To achieve its goal, the mission aims to raise awareness of the importance of healthy oceans, seas, coastal and inland waters among citizens and help develop solutions on a range of issues. Citizens are crucial to the design and accomplishment of the mission in helping to set objectives and targets and ensuring that missions like this one make a real difference in everybody’s lives. As part of the European Commission’s engagement with citizens across multiple EU countries on the mission, the Marine Institute developed a survey to consult Irish citizens and seek their views on what they believe are the top priorities for the health of the ocean and inland waters and how we can sustainably use and benefit from marine and aquatic resources. The survey was based around two areas of the proposed mission, namely: filling the knowledge and emotional gap, and; decarbonising our ocean, seas and waters. The survey was launched online on 13 August 2020 and was open for four weeks. This report presents the results of the survey summarising the opinions expressed by the 1013 respondents. The results provide an insight into people’s opinions and levels of awareness of our ocean, seas, coastal and inland waters and will inform the mission planning.
    • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore: Living Things - Simple Presentation

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Burke, Noirin (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore PowerPoint LIVING THINGS SIMPLE PRESENTATION can be used for junior science classes learning about living things on the seashore. The presentation looks at seaweeds and a selection of the different types of animals that are found on the seashore including jellyfish, crabs and fish. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard.
    • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore – Sorting and Classifying Seashore Animals Presentation

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Burke, Noirin (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore PowerPoint SORTING & CLASSIFYING SEASHORE ANIMALS Presentation can be used for science classes learning about living things as well as other cross curricular lesson plans. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard. The presentation includes lots of photographs of the seashore animals.
    • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore – Living Things Seashore Ecology Presentation

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Burke, Noirin (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore PowerPoint LIVING THINGS SEASHORE ECOLOGY Presentation can be used for science classes learning about living things as well as other cross curricular lesson plans. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard. The presentation includes lots of photographs of the seashore animals.
    • Year in Review 2020

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2021)
      This Year in Review 2020 is a snapshot of some of the Marine Institute's many highlights and achievements during an eventful year.
    • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore Species Activity sheets and Worksheets

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore Species Activity sheets and Work sheets can be used to support cross curricular teaching including science – living things, languages and the arts. The materials cover a range of seashore animal illustrations and questions. The sheets are divided into species and include Shellfish, Crustaceans, Fish, Jellies & Corals, Stars and Urchins and lots more.
    • Tuarascáil Bhliantúil 2019

      Foras na Mara (Foras na Mara, 2021)
    • Annual Report 2019

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2021)
    • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore Species Illustrations for Visual Arts

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore Species Illustrations for Visual Arts include over twenty seashore animal illustrations that can be used for visual arts and other cross curricular lesson plans. The visual arts sheets maybe used for projects and visual art classes including colouring, painting or use of textiles to demonstrate the children’s discovery and understanding of the seashore. The sheets are divided into species and include Shellfish, Crustaceans, Fish, Jellies & Corals, Stars & Urchins and lots more, and provide a caption box for children to write fun facts and details of their work. Click 'View more files' below the thumbnail images for more worksheets.
    • Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore Information sheets

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear (Marine Institute, 2021)
      In Ireland we are surrounded by so many different types of beaches ranging from sandy to shingle shores, as well as mudflats to rocky shore lines. This makes it an extremely exciting place to explore all of the amazing animals, seaweeds, plants and creatures that live there. The Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore information sheets can be used in the classroom to help teachers and children with their scientific discovery, learning more about the animals found on the Irish seashore.
    • The Real Map of Ireland

      INFOMAR (Marine Institute, 2019)
      Ireland’s marine territory extends far beyond our coastline up to 220 million acres (approx. 880,000km2), an area more than 10 times our land mass. The 'Real Map of Ireland' was developed using seabed information gathered as part of a major programme to map Ireland’s entire seabed territory. The programme began in 1999 as the Irish National Seabed Survey and continues today as INFOMAR*, a joint venture by the Geological Survey of Ireland and the Marine Institute. It’s one of the largest seabed mapping programmes in the world. The Real Map of Ireland shows Ireland's current designated Irish Continental Shelf, which is one of the largest seabed territories in Europe. The continental shelf is the extension of a State's territorial waters, where the natural land extends under the sea to the outer edge of the continental margin beyond 200 nautical miles from the coastline baseline. We have sovereign rights over the continental shelf to explore and develop its natural resources, according to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Part VI.
    • Newport Research Facility, Annual Report No. 64, 2019

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2020)
    • CE20_02 INFOMAR Survey Report

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI. The programme succeeded the INSS which was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas.
    • INFOMAR Survey Report CE20_01, Celtic Sea.

      Sheehan, Kevin (Marine Institute, 2021)
      The Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI. The programme succeeded the INSS which was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. Figure 1 shows the extent of the mapped area under INSS and INFOMAR and the outstanding areas as of January 2020. Grey have already been mapped, blue and coloured hatched areas are unmapped.
    • INFOMAR Survey Report CE19_01, Celtic Sea.

      Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2020)
      The Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI. The programme succeeded the INSS which was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. Figure 1 shows the extent of the mapped area under INSS and INFOMAR and the outstanding areas as of January 2019. Grey have already been mapped, blue and coloured hatched areas are unmapped.
    • Status of non-assessed fish species in Irish waters

      Palma-Pedraza, S.; Sarrazin, V.; Clarke, M.; Stokes, D. (Marine Institute, 2020)
      This report gives the latest assessment results for abundance of several fish species not otherwise assessed by international bodies or national agencies within Ireland. The assess-ment was performed to support Ireland’s obligations under the EU’s Marine Strategy Frame-work Directive (MSFD) to assess the state of commercial and non-commercial fish stocks. The commercially important stocks included in this assessment are recorded as being caught in Irish MSFD waters, from ICES FISHSTAT database, and for which sufficient trawl survey data are available to assess them. The non-commercial fish species included in this assess-ment are those present in the Irish MSFD area, which are either listed as being of conserva-tion concern under the EU’s data collection programme for fisheries, those on the OSPAR list of threatened species, elasmobranch species prohibited from being caught in commercial fisheries under the EU CFP legislation and/or those listed as endangered with extinction on the EU fish red list. The evaluation of the status of commercial and non-commercial species in the subareas VI and VII of FAO fishing area 27 was carried out using data from research vessels surveys. Data since 1998 were used and results show that only 4 of 10 commercial stocks were above the Good Environmental Status (GES) threshold value. The results of this work were then used to populate an overall assessment of GES for MSFD Descriptors D1 and D3 by Ireland in 2019.
    • Science Communication: Stakeholder perceptions of Real-time Incentive Fisheries Management

      Pedreschi, D.; Vigier, A.; Höffle, H.; Kraak, S.B.M.; Reid, D.G. (Marine Institute, 2021)
      In these changing times, with political and environmental uncertainty surrounding us, fisheries management needs to become more adaptive in order to respond to the changes in our natural environment and changing management frameworks. Based on close to real-time information updates, and harnessing modern technology, Real-Time Incentive (RTI) fisheries management is designed to evolve with the fish stocks, enabling managers to respond more quickly and efficiently to management issues as they arise. Through the use of a credit system that makes use of regularly updated fine-scale information, incentives can be incorporated as rewards to encourage desirable actions such as data collection or ‘fishing-for-litter’ activities. However, in order for a new system such as this to be useful and become accepted, stakeholders must be involved in the development and design process. This paper details the consultative process carried out with Irish demersal fishery stakeholders in an effort to identify their likes and dislikes of the system, and work towards tailoring the RTI system into a practical solution that works for them. In this process, we achieved a detailed understanding of the fishery, the complexity of the system, and the challenges faced by the stakeholders, all of which must be considered when attempting to implement a new management system such as RTI. A range of proposals were made by stakeholders, including new ideas for the future development of the RTI system. Most striking were the numerous ideas and approaches to tackling key issues currently facing the industry, many of which also have relevance to existing fisheries management. Given the freedom and support to do so, fishing industry stakeholders are eager to contribute to solving many of their own problems.
    • Marine Foresight Study

      APBmer; MacCabe Durney Barnes (Marine Institute, 2020-09)
      Ireland is experiencing a period of major change in terms of the legal and policy framework for marine decision-making, the political and socio-economic context for marine activities, the influence of technological change on marine activities and resultant societal impacts. Furthermore, increased awareness of the marine environment by the general public, owed to increased education and increased access to resources, as envisaged by the previous Integrated Marine Plan for Ireland, Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth (HOOW), continues to provide increased engagement with marine issues. Ireland is beginning the process of developing a successor to HOOW, and this foresight study seeks to support that process. The study has reviewed existing information, both in relation to past and current trends and potential future changes, in seeking to identify the key drivers of change across social, technological, economic, environmental and political topics. The results of the study are captured in an Evidence Database and summary report.
    • Joined up Thinking from Joined up Data.

      Currie, D.; Gault., J. (Marine Institute, 2020)
      The primary aim of this project was to develop and implement a strategy which would integrate and enable data interrogation across all data sources used by the Marine Institute's Fisheries Ecosystem Advisory Services (FEAS) group.
    • Celtic Sea Herring Acoustic Survey Cruise Report 2020, 04 - 24 October, 2020

      O’Donnell, C.; Mullins, E.; Lyons, K.; Connaughton, P.; Perez Tadeo, M. (Marine Institute, 2020)
      In the southwest of Ireland and the Celtic Sea (ICES Divisions VIIaS, g & j), herring are an important commercial species to the pelagic and polyvalent fleet. For a period in the 1970s and1980s, larval surveys were conducted for herring in this area. However, since 1989, acoustic surveys have been carried out, and currently are the only tuning indices available for this stock. In the Celtic Sea and VIIj, herring acoustic surveys have been carried out since 1989. Since 2004 the survey has been fixed in October and carried out onboard the RV Celtic Explorer. The geographical confines of the annual 21 day survey have been modified in recent years to include areas to the south of the main winter spawning grounds in an effort to identify the whereabouts of winter spawning fish before the annual inshore spawning migration. Spatial resolution of acoustic transects has been increased over the entire south coast survey area. The acoustic component of the survey has been further complemented since 2004 by detailed hydrographic, marine mammal and seabird surveys.