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IMDO Special Reports

Recent Submissions

  • Irish Ports Offshore Renewable Energy Services (IPORES): A Review of Irish Ports Offshore Capability in Relation to Requirements for the Marine Renewable Energy Industry. UPDATED EDITION

    Murphy, G. (Research & Editorial); O'Toole, M.l (Research & Editorial); McGuire, R. (Research & Editorial) (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2012)
    The report provides a detailed summary of information on Irish port infrastructure, facilities and management plans in relation to meeting requirements of marine renewable energy developers. The report found that at least seven Irish ports are in a good situation to facilitate and service both current and future demands of the offshore marine renewable sector. The report identifies that large scale development projects in particular have strong potential to generate several hundred new jobs and other positive economic benefits for the regions. The study involved a detailed stakeholder consultation process and analysis of 14 ports around the island of Ireland including a comparison with some key renewable energy services ports in the UK and Germany. Irish Ports were categorised according to criteria that would meet the requirements to service the offshore renewable energy sector which included port infrastructure, available quay space and hinterland, depth of water, past experience with the sector, proximity to markets, potential for job creation and availability of skills and maritime services. The report provides a number of recommendations including the establishment of clear targets to deliver new offshore ocean renewable projects at Irish ports leading to new investment and employment opportunities. Ireland’s offshore renewable energy resources are amongst the highest in the world with a potential of between 63,000 and 73,000 MW of power available for harnessing. Ports will play a key role in facilitating future large-scale developments and operations of ocean energy devices (wind turbines, wave energy converters and tidal turbines).
  • Review of Port Financial Accounts: Review of Irish Semi-State Port Companies Financial Accounts

    Murphy, G. (Research & Editorial); Curtin, F. (Research & Editorial); Spray, M. (Research & Editorial); Richardson, B.(Research & Editorial) (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2012)
    The focus of this analysis is to extrapolate key data from the annual company financial reports in order to provide a comparative review of the ports. The nine semi state port companies reviewed are all under the auspices of the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport. The key findings of the report highlight that after a combined growth of 3% in turnover in 2010, the nine commercial ports recorded a fall in turnover of 3% in 2011 with turnover falling to €120m. The cost of sales remained relatively unchanged at €46.9 million. Despite the downturn last year, five of the ports managed to return profits which contributed to a total operating profit for the industry of €33 million, almost identical to 2010, with four ports recording operating losses totalling €353,640. Dublin Port generated 57% of the total share of turnover, up 3% from 2011, while it was responsible for contributing 83% of the total operating profits from the nine ports last year. Dublin and Cork, contributed a dividend to the State in the financial accounts for 2011 of 16.5million and €634,315 respectively. Galway has also announced their intention to pay a dividend in their 2012 accounts. The latest analysis carried out by the IMDO also suggests that the majority of ports continued to reduce their costs during 2011. Labour costs fell by 8% last year, largely as a result of further reductions in the number of port employees from 429 to 389, which included a reduction of 11 employees as a result of the rationalisation of Dundalk Port Company. The total port labour force has now reduced by 26% since 2007. Eight of the nine companies recorded lower total labour operating costs in 2011. The average return on capital employed (ROCE) increased to 2.44% last year. However only three of the nine ports provided a ROCE higher than the average, with Dublin Port highest at just over 10%. The IMDO believes that trading conditions at Irish ports will remain challenging for the financial year 2012 with no anticipated prospects for overall growth in the principal cargo segments. The openness of the Irish economy will mean that any near to medium term recovery in traffic growth through Irish ports is likely to be dependent on a wider recovery occurring in the European and Global economy. Our forecast is that overall turnover and profits for the Irish ports will fall this year. However we still expect that the larger commercial ports will remain profitable while smaller regional ports are less likely to achieve breakeven levels this year. The review, assumptions and opinions expressed within this report are exclusively those of the IMDO.
  • Irish Ports Offshore Renewable Energy Services (IPORES): A Review of Irish Ports Offshore Capability in Relation to Requirements for the Marine Renewable Energy Industry

    Murphy, G. (Research & Editorial); O'Toole, M.(Research & Editorial); McGuire, R. (Research & Editorial) (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2012)
    The report provides a detailed summary of information on Irish port infrastructure, facilities and management plans in relation to meeting requirements of marine renewable energy developers. The report found that at least seven Irish ports are in a good situation to facilitate and service both current and future demands of the offshore marine renewable sector. The report identifies that large scale development projects in particular have strong potential to generate several hundred new jobs and other positive economic benefits for the regions. The study involved a detailed stakeholder consultation process and analysis of 14 ports around the island of Ireland including a comparison with some key renewable energy services ports in the UK and Germany. Irish Ports were categorised according to criteria that would meet the requirements to service the offshore renewable energy sector which included port infrastructure, available quay space and hinterland, depth of water, past experience with the sector, proximity to markets, potential for job creation and availability of skills and maritime services. The report provides a number of recommendations including the establishment of clear targets to deliver new offshore ocean renewable projects at Irish ports leading to new investment and employment opportunities. Ireland’s offshore renewable energy resources are amongst the highest in the world with a potential of between 63,000 and 73,000 MW of power available for harnessing. Ports will play a key role in facilitating future large-scale developments and operations of ocean energy devices (wind turbines, wave energy converters and tidal turbines).
  • Assessment of the Irish Ports & Shipping Requirements for the Marine Renewable Energy Industry : June 2011

    Wells, N.; McDonnell, M. (Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland and Irish Maritime Development Office, 2011)
    The study identifies a spatial framework of first-phase port locations for wind, wave and tidal developments. If Ireland is successful in developing a strong supply chain in offshore renewable energy, many Irish ports and harbours will be involved in related economic activity. The report sets out the background, the economic growth requirements and the nature of the infrastructure required for offshore, wind, wave and tidal sectors, and the locations that over the medium term are well placed to provide this growth. The study begins by establishing the geographical distribution of ocean renewable energy around the Irish coast. In terms of shipping, the study assesses the vessel type and the numbers required for various deployment scenarios for marine renewable energy in Ireland. The study highlights the importance of developing Ireland’s shipping and ports facilities in order to facilitate the future growth of our marine renewable industry and contains a detailed analysis of the existing ports infrastructure and shipping facilities that are available to support the industry’s development. It is noted that Irish ports and shipping vessels are well-placed to benefit from the substantial ramp-up in the development of offshore wind farms in the North Sea, where the total capital expenditure in the UK alone is estimated to be between €88bn and €102bn.