• The Development of Alternative Fuel Infrastructure in Irish Ports; A Feasibility Study

      Lacey, L.; Brewster, P.; Fallen Bailey, D. (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2019)
      Transportation across the European Union is almost entirely dependent on fossil fuels. To help reduce this dependency and the associated harmful environmental effects, the EU Commission established an alternative fuels strategy. The strategy identified the lack of supporting infrastructure as a key obstacle to the uptake of alternative fuel technology. As a result, EU Directive 2014/94/EU was developed to address these issues and was published in November 2014. In the maritime sector, the directive obliges Member States to install shore-side electricity (SSE) for seagoing ships in the ports of the TEN-T Core Network1 . In addition, Member States must ensure that an appropriate number of liquefied natural gas (LNG) refuelling points are put in place at maritime ports to enable vessels using LNG to circulate throughout the TEN-T Network. These objectives are to be met by 31 December 2025, unless there is an absence of demand or the relevant costs are disproportionate to the benefits. Motivated by the EU directive, this report has two distinct aims. First, to conduct a feasibility study of SSE for seagoing ships in TEN-T Irish ports and secondly, to assess the market demand for LNG fuelling facilities in major Irish ports. To accomplish the report’s objectives, it is important to understand where best practice has occurred in terms of Alternative Fuel Infrastructure (AFI) deployment. The report examines the factors that determine locational or sectoral concentrations in the deployment of AFI, and discusses the applicability of these factors to the Irish context. The report reaches conclusions about the feasibility of the deployment of AFI in Irish ports.
    • Irish Ports Offshore Renewable Energy Services (IPORES): A Review of Irish Ports Offshore Capability in Relation to Requirements for the Marine Renewable Energy Industry

      Murphy, G. (Research & Editorial); O'Toole, M.(Research & Editorial); McGuire, R. (Research & Editorial) (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2012)
      The report provides a detailed summary of information on Irish port infrastructure, facilities and management plans in relation to meeting requirements of marine renewable energy developers. The report found that at least seven Irish ports are in a good situation to facilitate and service both current and future demands of the offshore marine renewable sector. The report identifies that large scale development projects in particular have strong potential to generate several hundred new jobs and other positive economic benefits for the regions. The study involved a detailed stakeholder consultation process and analysis of 14 ports around the island of Ireland including a comparison with some key renewable energy services ports in the UK and Germany. Irish Ports were categorised according to criteria that would meet the requirements to service the offshore renewable energy sector which included port infrastructure, available quay space and hinterland, depth of water, past experience with the sector, proximity to markets, potential for job creation and availability of skills and maritime services. The report provides a number of recommendations including the establishment of clear targets to deliver new offshore ocean renewable projects at Irish ports leading to new investment and employment opportunities. Ireland’s offshore renewable energy resources are amongst the highest in the world with a potential of between 63,000 and 73,000 MW of power available for harnessing. Ports will play a key role in facilitating future large-scale developments and operations of ocean energy devices (wind turbines, wave energy converters and tidal turbines).
    • Irish Ports Offshore Renewable Energy Services (IPORES): A Review of Irish Ports Offshore Capability in Relation to Requirements for the Marine Renewable Energy Industry. UPDATED EDITION

      Murphy, G. (Research & Editorial); O'Toole, M.l (Research & Editorial); McGuire, R. (Research & Editorial) (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2012)
      The report provides a detailed summary of information on Irish port infrastructure, facilities and management plans in relation to meeting requirements of marine renewable energy developers. The report found that at least seven Irish ports are in a good situation to facilitate and service both current and future demands of the offshore marine renewable sector. The report identifies that large scale development projects in particular have strong potential to generate several hundred new jobs and other positive economic benefits for the regions. The study involved a detailed stakeholder consultation process and analysis of 14 ports around the island of Ireland including a comparison with some key renewable energy services ports in the UK and Germany. Irish Ports were categorised according to criteria that would meet the requirements to service the offshore renewable energy sector which included port infrastructure, available quay space and hinterland, depth of water, past experience with the sector, proximity to markets, potential for job creation and availability of skills and maritime services. The report provides a number of recommendations including the establishment of clear targets to deliver new offshore ocean renewable projects at Irish ports leading to new investment and employment opportunities. Ireland’s offshore renewable energy resources are amongst the highest in the world with a potential of between 63,000 and 73,000 MW of power available for harnessing. Ports will play a key role in facilitating future large-scale developments and operations of ocean energy devices (wind turbines, wave energy converters and tidal turbines).