• The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 1

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2004)
      The Irish Maritime Transport Economist (IMTE) aims to provide Irish companies involved in International trade with a single journal that provides and collates relevant statistical economic, trade, traffic and shipping market information. The focus of the data herein is on the impact and outlook of Irish maritime trade related performance.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 11

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance.Turning to the performance of the sector in 2013, it is clear that a number of indicators give cause for greater optimism than has been the case in recent years. The volume of trade that moves through Irish ports is a reliable indicator of national economic performance and activity.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 14

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Marine Institute, 2017)
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 15

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2018)
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 2

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2005)
      The Irish Maritime Transport Economist (IMTE) aims to provide Irish companies involved in International trade with a single journal that provides and collates relevant statistical economic, trade, traffic and shipping market information. The focus of the data herein is on the impact and outlook of Irish maritime trade related performance.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 3

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2006)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 4

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2007)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 5

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2008)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 6

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2009)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance. The year 2008 will be remembered, amongst other things, as the year when Ireland’s longest period of economic expansion came to an abrupt end. Many of Ireland’s economic risks appeared to realise at the same time. The cooling domestic market converged with a meltdown in global economies triggered by a systemic collapse of the international financial and banking sectors. In essence, the perfect economic storm, which had been looming off shore since 2007 eventually hit our shores last year, however, very few had predicted the force when it finally arrived. The signs of a slowdown in the Irish economy started to appear in 2006 when domestic investment declined before turning negative in 2007 and any chance of a “soft landing” for the Irish economy dissipated quickly by the middle of 2008. This year’s publication illustrates the sharp correction in activity in the real economy and the corresponding reversal in shipping volume growth throughput at our ports.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 7

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2010)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance. This is our 7th annual edition of the Irish Transport Economist and it is, undoubtedly, the bleakest review that we have published to date. Overall, in terms of content and analysis for 2009, there are very few positives to report, with almost no growth in any area over the course of the year. The relentless unwinding of the economy last year was, again, clearly illustrated in the continued abrupt correction in volume throughput at our ports. Nonetheless, while the trend for 2009 was negative, we observed that the pace of decline in economic activity moderated significantly since last spring with some volume recovery in several of our domestic shipping segments recorded to the year end. As we look forward to 2010, we do so with some optimism, that both economically and sectorally, we have passed the trough of the economic downturn and that the economy will exit recession this year with a return to growth in 2011.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 8

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2011)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance. After an extremely bleak review in 2009 we are at last able to again reference the word “growth” in this our 8th annual edition of the Irish Maritime Transport Economist. Over the previous 30 months we have seen an incredible contraction take place in the Irish economy where growth across most business sectors was in short supply. In our previous review we had identified that the rate and scale of decline in the principle shipping market segments was slowing and that we were optimistic that perhaps we had reached the bottom in terms of shipping volume erosion. This year’s publication confirms that some recovery took place during 2010. The impetus towards a gradual recovery was led by our export sector, in particular the broad chemical and pharmaceutical segments. The ongoing recovery in the global economy also boosted exports by our indigenous agri-business and food & drink sectors. However the export recovery does not accurately reflect the overall state of the economy, and over the course of 2010 the precarious state of our banking sector continued to unravel with further serious financial liabilities being exposed. The over-arching consequence of this has dampened economic confidence, impacted on consumer demand, and this in turn has lead to a further decline in import volumes last year.
    • Review of Port Financial Accounts: Review of Irish Semi-State Port Companies Financial Accounts

      Murphy, G. (Research & Editorial); Curtin, F. (Research & Editorial); Spray, M. (Research & Editorial); Richardson, B.(Research & Editorial) (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2012)
      The focus of this analysis is to extrapolate key data from the annual company financial reports in order to provide a comparative review of the ports. The nine semi state port companies reviewed are all under the auspices of the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport. The key findings of the report highlight that after a combined growth of 3% in turnover in 2010, the nine commercial ports recorded a fall in turnover of 3% in 2011 with turnover falling to €120m. The cost of sales remained relatively unchanged at €46.9 million. Despite the downturn last year, five of the ports managed to return profits which contributed to a total operating profit for the industry of €33 million, almost identical to 2010, with four ports recording operating losses totalling €353,640. Dublin Port generated 57% of the total share of turnover, up 3% from 2011, while it was responsible for contributing 83% of the total operating profits from the nine ports last year. Dublin and Cork, contributed a dividend to the State in the financial accounts for 2011 of 16.5million and €634,315 respectively. Galway has also announced their intention to pay a dividend in their 2012 accounts. The latest analysis carried out by the IMDO also suggests that the majority of ports continued to reduce their costs during 2011. Labour costs fell by 8% last year, largely as a result of further reductions in the number of port employees from 429 to 389, which included a reduction of 11 employees as a result of the rationalisation of Dundalk Port Company. The total port labour force has now reduced by 26% since 2007. Eight of the nine companies recorded lower total labour operating costs in 2011. The average return on capital employed (ROCE) increased to 2.44% last year. However only three of the nine ports provided a ROCE higher than the average, with Dublin Port highest at just over 10%. The IMDO believes that trading conditions at Irish ports will remain challenging for the financial year 2012 with no anticipated prospects for overall growth in the principal cargo segments. The openness of the Irish economy will mean that any near to medium term recovery in traffic growth through Irish ports is likely to be dependent on a wider recovery occurring in the European and Global economy. Our forecast is that overall turnover and profits for the Irish ports will fall this year. However we still expect that the larger commercial ports will remain profitable while smaller regional ports are less likely to achieve breakeven levels this year. The review, assumptions and opinions expressed within this report are exclusively those of the IMDO.