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dc.contributor.authorMcGinnity, P
dc.contributor.authorJennings, E
dc.contributor.authordeEyto, E
dc.contributor.authorAllott, N
dc.contributor.authorSamuelsson, P
dc.contributor.authorRogan, G
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, K
dc.contributor.authorCross, T
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-02T15:08:11Z
dc.date.available2011-08-02T15:08:11Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationMcGinnity P., Jennings E., deEyto E., Allott N., Samuelsson P., Rogan G., Whelan K., et al. Impact of naturally spawning captive-bred Atlantic salmon on wild populations: depressed recruitment and increased risk of climate-mediated extinction. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B: Biological Sciences 2009;276:3601-3610.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0080-4649
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10793/591
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2009.0799
dc.descriptionPublished version available online: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/276/1673/3601 DOI:10.1098/rspb.2009.0799 © 2009 The Royal Society This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_GB
dc.descriptionpeer-reviewed
dc.description.abstractThe assessment report of the 4th International Panel on Climate Change confirms that global warming is strongly affecting biological systems and that 20–30% of species risk extinction from projected future increases in temperature. It is essential that any measures taken to conserve individual species and their constituent populations against climate-mediated declines are appropriate. The release of captive bred animals to augment wild populations is a widespread management strategy for many species but has proven controversial. Using a regression model based on a 37-year study of wild and sea ranched Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) spawning together in the wild, we show that the escape of captive bred animals into the wild can substantially depress recruitment and more specifically disrupt the capacity of natural populations to adapt to higher winter water temperatures associated with climate variability. We speculate the mechanisms underlying this seasonal response and suggest that an explanation based on bio-energetic processes with physiological responses synchronized by photoperiod is plausible. Furthermore, we predict, by running the model forward using projected future climate scenarios, that these cultured fish substantially increase the risk of extinction for the studied population within 20 generations. In contrast, we show that positive outcomes to climate change are possible if captive bred animals are prevented from breeding in the wild. Rather than imposing an additional genetic load on wild populations by releasing maladapted captive bred animals, we propose that conservation efforts should focus on optimizing conditions for adaptation to occur by reducing exploitation and protecting critical habitats. Our findings are likely to hold true for most poikilothermic species where captive breeding programmes are used in population management.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipP.M. was supported partly by the Beaufort Award in Fish Population Genetics funded under the National Development Plan for Ireland. E.J. was supported by funding from the Environmental Protection Agency (Ireland) under the National Development Plan (ILLUMINATE project: 2005-W-MS-40-M1). Other contributing programmes include the European Commission’s Environment and Sustainable Development Programme contract EVK1-CT-2002-00121 (CLIME); EU Climate and Environment, contract PL970936 (REFLECT).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherRoyal Society Publishingen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences;276 (1673)
dc.subjectcaptive breedingen_GB
dc.subjectatlantic salmonen_GB
dc.subjectclimate changeen_GB
dc.subjectbioenergeticsen_GB
dc.titleImpact of naturally spawning captive-bred Atlantic salmon on wild populations: depressed recruitment and increased risk of climate-mediated extinctionen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T03:48:34Z


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