Now showing items 61-80 of 168

    • Environmental survey of coastal and shelf waters- Southabout winter nutrients, benthos and contaminants monitoring

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The 2015 survey continues the Marine Institute's Winter Nutrients monitoring that commenced in 1990. The survey evolved during this time period with respect to parameters and sampling strategy. In 2011 this survey was re-established as a winter environmental survey with a broader remit to provide supporting information for OSPAR and Water Framework Directive (WFD - Directive 2000/60/EC)assessments and also to maintain the winter time series on key biogeochemical parameters in Irish waters in response to pressures such as land based inputs of nutrients and climate change. Since 2011 the survey circumnavigates the island of Ireland every two years, alternating southabout (odd years) and northabout (even years), starting in the Irish Sea and ending in Galway. The 2015 survey was designed to collect multidisciplinary information on physics, water chemistry (dissolved nutrients, dissolved oxygen, carbonate parameters (TA, DIC), salinity), sediment chemistry (persistent organic pollutants POPs and trace metals)sediment particle size distribution and benthic macroinvertebrates.
    • Environmental survey of coastal and shelf waters- Northabout winter nutrients, benthos and contaminants monitoring

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The 2014 survey continues the Marine Institute's Winter Nutrients monitoring that commenced in 1990. The survey evolved during this time period with respect to parameters and sampling strategy. In 2011 this survey was re-established as a winter environmental survey with a broader remit to provide supporting information for OSPAR and Water Framework Directive (WFD - Directive 2000/60/EC)assessments and also to maintain the winter time series on key biogeochemical parameters in Irish waters in response to pressures such as land based inputs of nutrients and climate change. the 2014 survey was designed to collect multidisciplinary information on physics, water chemistry (dissolved nutrients, dissolved oxygen, carbonate parameters (TA, DIC), salinity), sediment chemistry (persistent organic pollutants POPs and trace metals)sediment particle size distribution and benthic macroinvertebrates.
    • Environmental survey of coastal and shelf waters- Northabout winter nutrients, benthos and contaminants monitoring

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2012)
      The 2012 survey builds on the MI Winter Nutrients Survey that ran from 1990 to 2011 (except 2010). The survey evolved during this time period with respect to parameters and sampling strategy. The 2012 survey designed to collect multidisciplinary information on physics, water chemistry (dissolved nutrients, dissolved oxygen, carbonate parameters (TA, DIC), salinity), sediment chemistry (persistent organic pollutants POPs and trace metals)sediment particle size distribution and benthic macroinvertebrates.
    • Environmental survey of coastal and shelf waters- winter nutrients

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2011)
      The 2011 survey builds on the MI Winter Nutrients Survey that ran from 1990 to 2009. The survey evolved during this time period with respect to parameters and sampling strategy. The 2011 survey was further expanded to collect multidisciplinary information on physics, chemistry (nutrients, DO, carbonate parameters, salinity)and biology (benthic, macroinvertebrates, winter phytoplankton baseline)of these waters.
    • International Blue Whiting Spawning Stock Survey (IBWSS) Spring 2016

      Marine Institute; Institute for Marine Resources & Ecosystem Studies; PINRO; Faroe Marine Research Institute; Marine Scotland Marine Laboratory; Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut; Danish Institute for Fisheries Research; Birdwatch Ireland; Galway/Mayo Institute of technology (Marine Institute, 2016)
      Coordination of the survey was initiated in the meeting of the Working Group on International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) and continued by correspondence until the start of the survey. During the survey, updates on vessel positions and trawl activities were collated by the survey coordinator and distributed to the participants twice daily. The survey design used and described in ICES (2015) allowed for a flexible setup of transects and good coverage of the spawning aggregations. Overall weather conditions were good during the survey with a total of 3 days weather down time recorded. Transects undertaken by all vessels were consistent in spatial coverage and timing, delivering full coverage of the respective distribution areas within 23 days.
    • Celtic Sea Herring Acoustic Survey Cruise Report 2015, 02-22 October 2015

      O’Donnell, C.; Lynch, D.; Lyons, K.; Keogh, N.; O’Donovan, M. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      In the southwest of Ireland and the Celtic Sea (ICES Divisions VIIaS, g & j),herring acoustic surveys have been carried out since 1989. In the Celtic Sea and VIIj, herring acoustic surveys have been carried out since 1989, and this survey is the 21st in the overall acoustic series or the tenth in the modified time series conducted exclusively in October. The geographical confines of the annual 21 day survey have been modified in recent years to include areas to the south of the main winter spawning grounds in an effort to identify the whereabouts of winter spawning fish before the annual inshore spawning migration. Spatial resolution of acoustic transects has been increased over the entire south coast survey area. The acoustic component of the survey has been further complemented since 2004 by detailed hydrographic, marine mammal and seabird surveys.
    • Boarfish Acoustic Survey Cruise Report 10 July – 31 July, 2015

      O'Donnell, C.; Nolan, C. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      From the early 1970s the abundance of boarfish (Capros aper) was seen to increase exponentially and distribution spread increasingly northwards along the western seaboard and Bay of Biscay (Blanchard and Vandermeirsch, 2005).This survey represents the fifth dedicated research survey for boarfish in the time series. The commercial fishing vessel MFV Felucca was employed for the survey and the vessels hull mounted transducer was calibrated for scientific output. Data from this survey will be presented to the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2015 and as part of the ICES Planning Group meeting for International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) meeting in January 2016 (WGIPS).
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, March 22 - April 01, 2015

      O'Donnell, C.; Nolan, C.; Johnston, G.; Keogh, N.; van der Knaap, I.; Borawska, A.; O’Donovan, M. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      Acoustic surveys on blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. The 2015 survey was part of an international collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), FV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62° N) to south of Ireland (51° N), with east -west extension from 4°-18° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance stock estimate and report. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGIPS meeting held in January. The information presented here relates specifically to the Irish survey component.
    • Western Irish Sea Nephrops Grounds (FU15) 2015 UWTV Survey Report and catch options for 2016

      Clements, A.; Doyle, J.; Lordan, C.; Brown, V.; Doran, S.; McArdle, J.; McCausland, I.; McCorriston, P.; Simpson, S.; Schon, J. (Marine Institute and Agri-Food and Bioscience Institute, 2015)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the 13th annual underwater television survey on the ‘Irish sea west Nephrops grounds’ ICES assessment area, Functional Unit 15.
    • The “Smalls” Nephrops Grounds (FU22) 2015 UWTV Survey Report and catch options for 2016

      Lordan, C.; Doyle, J.; Fitzgerald, R.; O’Connor, S.; Blaszkowski, M.; Butler, R. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the tenth annual underwater television survey on the ‘Smalls grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 22. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD and other ecosystem data. A total of 33 UWTV stations were surveyed successfully (good quality video footage) carried out over an isometric grid at 4.5nmi or 8.3km intervals. Of the planned stations 17% (7) could not be completed due to very poor or nil visibility conditions encountered at seabed. For these stations density estimates were filled-in using and average of historic values within 2nmi. The resulting krigged burrow abundance estimate for the Smalls ground decreased by 16% relative to 2014. The final abundance estimate was 1,363 million. The precision, with a CV of 7%, was well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS 2012. Using the 2015 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch of 3,027 tonnes and landings of 2634 tonnes in 2016 fishing at Fmsy (assuming that all catch is landed). Only one species of sea pen Virgilaria mirabilis was recorded as present at the stations surveyed. Trawl marks were observed at 12% of the stations surveyed.
    • The Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks Nephrops Grounds (FU2021) 2015 UWTV Survey Report and catch options for 2016

      Lordan, C.; Doyle, J.; Fitzgerald, R.; O’Connor, S.; Blaszkowski, M.; Stokes, D.; Ni Chonchuir, G.; Gallagher, J.; Butler, R.; Sheridan, M.; et al. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      This report provides the main results of the 2015 underwater television survey on the ‘Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 20-21. This was the second survey to achieve full coverage of the full area. The 2015 survey was multidisciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD and other ecosystem data. A total of 96 UWTV stations were completed at 6 nmi intervals over a randomised isometric grid design. The mean burrow density was 0.20 burrows/m2 compared with 0.19 burrows/m2 in 2014. The 2015 geostatistical abundance estimate was 2.0±0.02 billion a 2% decrease on the abundance for 2014 with a CV of 3% which is well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS 2012. Highest densities were general observed towards the north and southwest of the ground, and there were also high densities observed close to boundaries. Using the 2015 abundance estimate and updated stock data implies catch of 3045 tonnes and landings of 2225 tonnes. Only one species of sea pen Virgilaria mirabilis was recorded as present at the stations surveyed. Trawl marks were observed at 30% of the stations surveyed.
    • FU19 Nephrops Grounds 2015 UWTV Survey and catch options for 2016

      Lordan, C.; Doyle, J.; Fitzgerald, R.; O’Connor, S.; Blaszkowski, M.; Stokes, D.; Ni Chonchuir, G.; Gallagher, J.; Butler, R.; Sheridan, M.; et al. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      This report provides the main results of the sixth underwater television survey of the various Nephrops patches in Functional Unit 19. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD, multi-beam and other ecosystem data. In 2015 a total 39 UWTV stations were successfully completed. The mean density estimates varied considerably across the different patches. The 2015 raised abundance estimate of 482 million burrows was a 24% decrease from the 2014 estimate. Taking into account the uncertainty (CV of 13%) there is no significant difference in abundance estimates since 2011. Using the 2015 abundance estimate and recent mean weights and discard parameters would imply total catches of 793 t fishing at Fmsy in 2016. This stock will be subject to the landing obligation in 2016 and the calculation of catch options assume that all catches will be landed in 2016. The catch can be partitioned into landings of 543 t and discards of 250 t. The estimated discards rates in FU19 are relatively high and impact of this on the catch options is discussed. One species of sea pen was observed; Virgularia mirabilis which has been observed on previous surveys of FU19.
    • Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne Head Nephrops Grounds (FU17) 2015 UWTV Survey Report and catch options for 2016

      Doyle, J.; Lordan, C.; Fitzgerald, R.; O’Connor, S.; Fee, D.; Butler, R.; Stokes, D.; Ni Chonchuir, G.; Gallagher, J.; Sheridan, M.; et al. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the fourteenth annual underwater television on the Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne head Nephrops grounds, ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 17. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, fishing, CTD and other ecosystem data. In 2015 a total of 44 UWTV stations were successfully completed, 34 on the Aran Grounds and 5 on each of the Slyne Head and Galway Bay patches. The mean burrow density observed in 2015, adjusted for edge effect, was medium at 0.38 burrows/m². The final krigged burrow abundance estimate for the Aran Grounds was 480 million burrows with a CV (or relative standard error) of 6 %. The final abundance estimate for Galway Bay and Slyne Head was 56 and 20 million burrows with CVs of 15% and 4% respectively. The total abundance estimates have fluctuated considerably over the time series. The 2015 abundance estimate was 42% higher than in 2014 and at 556 million and is just above to the new MSY Btrigger (540 million). Using the 2015 abundance estimate and updated stock data implies catch of 991 tonnes and landings of 915 tonnes in 2016 fishing at Fmsy (assuming all catch is landed). Virgilaria mirabilis was the most common of the two sea-pen species observed on the UWTV footage. Pennatula phosphorea was observed at one station on the Slyne Head Nephrops ground. Key words: Nephrops norvegicus, stock assessment, geostatistics, underwater television (UWTV), benthos, CTD. Suggested citation:
    • International Blue Whiting Spawning Stock Survey (IBWSS) Spring 2015

      Marine Institute; Institute for Marine Resources & Ecosystem Studies; Institute of Marine Research; PINRO; Faroe Marine Research Institute; Marine Scotland Marine Laboratory; Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut; Danish Institute for Fisheries Research; Birdwatch Ireland; Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (Marine Institute, 2015)
      Coordination of the survey was initiated in the meeting of the Working Group on International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) and continued by correspondence until the start of the survey. During the survey, updates on vessel positions and trawl activities were collated by the survey coordinator and distributed to the participants twice daily. The survey design used and described in ICES (2014) allowed for a flexible setup of transects and good coverage of the spawning aggregations. Considering weather conditions were by no means optimal during the survey period, good quality coverage of the stock was achieved. Transects of all vessels were consistent in spatial coverage and timing, delivering full coverage of the respective distribution areas within 14 days.
    • Irish Groundfish Survey Cruise Report, Sept. 24th – Dec. 17th, 2014

      Stokes, D.; O'Hea, B.; Moore, S.J.; Dransfeld, L.; Gerritsen, H.D. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The Irish Groundfish Survey forms part of the International Bottom Trawl Survey (IBTS) programme, an international survey effort coordinated by ICES (the International Council of the Exploration of the Sea). Over 42 days in the Autumn/Winter each year the survey collects demersal trawl and ancillary data in Irish waters to produce relative abundance indices for fisheries management. Results from 2014 are presented here and suggest a significant increase in numbers of juvenile haddock and whiting over the recent 5 year period in the northwest. In the Celtic Sea area horse mackerel numbers also show an increase. The other gadoid and pelagic species are within the normal inter-annual fluctuations.
    • Northwest Herring Acoustic Survey Report 22nd June – 12th July, 2014

      Nolan, Cormac; O'Donnell, Ciaran; Campbell, Andrew; Sullivan, Mairead; Mullins, Eugene (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The northwest and west coast (ICES Divisions VIaS & VIIb, c) herring acoustic survey programme was first established in 1994.The summer 2014 survey represents the seventh in the new time series (est. in 2008). The survey was coordinated through the ICES Working Group of International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS). The Irish component was carried out to cover the statistical rectangles between 53°30’-58°30' N and 12°-5° W as laid out in the WGIPS report (ICES, 2014). Combined survey data on herring distribution, abundance and age are used to provide a measure of the relative abundance of herring within the Malin shelf stock complex. Survey data on stock numbers at age are submitted to the ICES Herring Assessment Working Group (HAWG) and used in the annual stock assessment process.The northwest and west coast (ICES Divisions VIaS & VIIb) herring stock is composed of two spawning components, autumn and winter spawners. Spawning covers a large geographical area and extends over a 4-month period from late September through to late March (Molloy et al, 2000). Traditionally, fishing effort has been concentrated on spawning and pre-spawning aggregations. The autumn spawning component, which mostly occurs within VIIb and VIaS, feeds along the shelf break area to the west of the spawning grounds. The larger winter spawning component is found further north in VIa. In VIaS, summer distribution extends from close inshore to the shelf break. Components of the winter spawning fish are known to undertake northward feeding migration into VIaN before returning in the winter to spawn along the Irish coast.
    • Celtic Sea Herring Acoustic Survey Cruise Report 2014, 06-26 October 2014.

      Nolan, Cormac; O'Donnell, Ciaran; Lynch, Deirdre; Lyons, Kieran; Keogh, Niall; McAvoy, Stephen; Cronin, Ciaran; Hunt, William (Marine Institute, 2014)
      In the southwest of Ireland and the Celtic Sea (ICES Divisions VIIaS, g & j),herring acoustic surveys have been carried out since 1989. This survey was undertaken in early October. The geographical confines of the annual 21 day survey program have been modified in recent years to include areas to the south of the main winter spawning grounds in an effort to identify the whereabouts of winter spawning fish before the annual inshore spawning migration. Spatial resolution of acoustic transects has been increased over the entire south coast survey area. The acoustic component of the survey has been further complimented since 2004 by detailed hydrographic and marine mammal and seabird surveys.
    • The “Smalls” Nephrops Grounds (FU22) 2014 UWTV Survey Report and catch options for 2015

      Lordan, C.; Doyle, J.; Fitzgerald, R.; O'Connor, S.; Blaszkowski, M.; Simpson, S. (Marine Institute, 2014-10)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the ninth annual underwater television survey on the ‘Smalls grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 22. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD and other ecosystem data. A total of 52 stations UWTV stations were carried out over an isometric grid at 4.5nmi or 8.3km intervals. The krigged burrow abundance estimate for the Smalls ground increased by 22% relative to 2013 and was the highest in the 9 year time series. The final abundance estimate was 1,622 million with a CV of 8% which is well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS 2012. Using the 2014 estimate of abundance and recent mean weight and discard data would imply total catches at Fmsy in 2015 of 3,797t. This implies landings of 3,409 tonnes. Temperature on the seabed varied by 2oC over the Nephrops ground with coldest values around 9.4oC in the deepest part of the area. Only one species of sea pen Virgilaria mirabilis was recorded as present at 46% of the stations surveyed. Trawl marks were observed at 28% of the stations surveyed.
    • The Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks Nephrops Grounds (FU2021) 2014 UWTV Survey Report and catch options for 2015

      Doyle, J.; Lordan, C.; Hehir, I.; Fitzgerald, R.; O'Connor, S.; Keith, M.; Sheridan, M. (Marine Institute, 2014-10)
      This report provides the main results of the 2014 underwater television survey on the ‘Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 20-21. Some exploratory UWTV stations were carried out in 2006 and 2012. In 2013 ~60% of the ground was surveyed. This was the first survey to achieve full coverage of the newly defined area. The 2014 survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD and other ecosystem data. A randomised isometric grid design was employed with 98 UWTV stations at 6.0 nmi intervals. The mean burrow density was 0.19 burrows/m2 compared with 0.16 burrows/m2 in 2013. The 2014 geostatistical abundance estimate was 2.1±0.1 billion a 26% increase on the extrapolated abundance for 2013. Highest densities were general observed towards the middle of the ground, but there were also high densities observed close to boundaries. Using the 2014 abundance and recent fisheries data it is possible to estimate harvest ratios consistent with various landings options. These can be used by ICES to provide catch options for 2015. The occurrence of sea-pens and trawl marks on the UWTV footage and processed CTD is also presented.
    • FU19 Nephrops Grounds 2014 UWTV Survey and catch options for 2015

      Lordan, C.; Doyle, J.; Fitzgerald, R.; O'Connor, S.; Blaszkowski, M.; Simpson, S. (Marine Institute, 2014-10)
      This report provides the main results and findings of the fifth underwater television survey of the various Nephrops patches in Functional Unit 19. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD, multi-beam and other ecosystem data. In 2014 a total 40 UWTV stations were successfully completed. The mean density estimates varied considerably across the different patches. The 2014 raised abundance estimate of 636 million burrows was a 31% increase from the 2013 estimate. Taking into account the uncertainty (CV of 15%) this is not significantly different from abundance estimates since 2011. Using the 2014 abundance and recent mean weight and discard parameters would imply total catches of 1119 t fishing at Fmsy in 2015. Based on recent discard patterns which are high in this area; 715 t would be landings and 404 t would be discards. Two species of sea pen were observed; Virgularia mirabilis and Pennatula phosphorea, both species have been observed on previous surveys of FU19.