• Marine Biotechnology Task Force Report

      Marine Biotechnology Task (Marine Institute, 2017)
      Marine biotechnology is a rapidly growing area that is recognised, by policy makers and the enterprise sector, as offering significant potential to develop market opportunities for new products and processes by enabling greater utilisation of marine biological resources. Current research funding activity, supporting efforts to create a sustainable bioeconomy, is likely to lead to a growth in marine biotechnology research and commercial activities. Irish and international financial support for this research is aimed at as yet largely unexplored and underexploited marine resources for use as food, functional foods and nutraceuticals; cosmetics and cosmeceuticals; human and animal health – including pharmaceuticals, biocompatible materials and medical devices; materials technology; environmental bioremediation; and marine model organisms, including the use of marine derived materials in bioprocessing. Research within these areas has resulted in an array of new products and processes which offer benefits to society and support economic growth. The Marine Institute established a Task Force to advise on the steps required to strengthen Ireland’s capability to use marine biotechnology to exploit the value of its extensive marine bioresources. The Task Force, comprising academic and industry members, considered the various national strategies and plans for science, technology, research and economic development, and identified market opportunity areas and Irish marine biotechnology research capabilities. In supporting the work of the Task Force, the Marine Institute completed a number of information-gathering exercises to fill various knowledge gaps identified by the Task Force. Following the preparation of a draft report, the Task Force, with the support of the Marine Institute, held a workshop attended by researchers and companies. This final report of the Task Force takes account of feedback from this workshop in developing its recommendations.
    • Monitoring Chemical Pollution in Europe’s Seas: Programmes, Practices and Priorities for Research

      Roose, P.; Albaigés, J.; Bebianno, M.J.; Camphuysen, C.; Cronin, M.; de Leeuw, J.; Gabrielsen, G.; Hutchinson, T.; Hylland, K.; Jansson, B.; et al. (Marine Board-ESF, 2011)
      This report has been produced by the Marine Board Working Group on Existing and Emerging Chemical Pollutants (WGPOL) first convened in 2008 and tasked to examine the assessment and monitoring of existing and emerging chemicals in the European marine and coastal environment. The Working Group considered (i) existing monitoring/assessment frameworks; (ii) current monitoring practices; and (iii) new and emerging chemicals of concern and the mechanisms used to include them in current monitoring programmes. The primary conclusions and recommendations of this position paper are: 1. Fully implement state of the art environmental risk assessment procedures (combining exposure and effect assessment) to evaluate the full impact of chemical substances on the different compartments of coastal and open sea systems. 2. Further improve the coordination, cooperation and harmonization between existing monitoring efforts and those under development, to avoid duplication of effort, loss of expertise and a reduced willingness to fulfil the obligations towards regional conventions. 3. Ensure that the development and implementation of monitoring programmes for the assessment of chemicals in marine and coastal environment are based on a science-based and dynamic process. 4. Apply more resources targeted at developing appropriate approaches, tools and practices (education and training) to improve the acquisition and management of monitoring data. In addition to the above main recommendations, two further recommendations have been identified on the basis of two specific case studies which form part of this paper and which focus on the release, effects and monitoring of (i) hydrophobic and insoluble chemicals in the marine environment from merchant shipping; and (ii) chemicals released by the offshore oil-industry in the North Sea. These case studies highlighted the need to: 5. Develop a consistent, pan-European or regional (legal) framework/regulation which covers the activities of the oil and gas industry at sea. At the same time, more information and research is needed on the release and the effects of chemicals arising from offshore oil and gas activities. 6. Develop and apply state-of-the-art environmental risk assessment procedures (combining exposure and effect assessments, including on human health) to evaluate the impact of noxious liquid substances listed under MARPOL Annex II on the different compartments in coastal and open sea ecosystems.
    • A National Survey of Water-Based Leisure Activities in Ireland 2003

      Williams, J [ESRI]; Ryan, B [ESRI] (Marine Institute, 2004)
      This survey profiles the domestic market for water-based tourism, sport and leisure in Ireland. The data provides up-to-date statistical information on 18 water-based leisure activities broadly grouped under the following categories: Seaside/Resort trips; Angling; Coastal and Inland Boating; and Watersports. The objective of the survey is to demonstrate the significant contribution of marine leisure activity to the national economy, and to highlight emerging trends and the potential for development of our water-based leisure resources. A key finding of the survey, conducted by the ESRI in 2003, is that marine leisure activity based on Ireland’s marine and freshwater resources generates €434 million in expenditure by Irish residents, and approximately 5,100 jobs are supported by this level of expenditure. A comparison of the domestic tourism market and the water-based tourism domestic market further highlights the value of the sector. In 2003, water-based tourism accounted for 22 per cent of the domestic tourism market and generated 45 per cent of domestic tourism revenue. Our seaside resorts, beaches, inland waterways and rivers provide the resource for a wide range of water-based tourism recreation, sport and leisure activities. The survey results show that 1.48 million persons, representing 49 per cent of the adult population participated in some form of water-based activity during the survey period. Although overall satisfaction with facilities was high, a further 10 per cent of the adult population (294,100) said they would take up some marine leisure activity if facilities were better. This demonstrates the potential and scope for development in the sector.
    • Negotiations for the establishment of a pilchard fishery at Bantry in 1875

      Went, A. E. J. (Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 1875)
    • Ocean Energy in Ireland

      Marine Institute; Sustainable Energy Ireland (Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources, 2005)
      Ireland has a target of supplying 13.2% of its electricity consumption from renewable sources by 2010. The majority of this target is likely to be supplied from wind energy. It is likely that targets will increase in the longer term. This will require large deployments of other forms of renewable energy. Ocean energy, both wave and marine current tidal energy, may have a role to play in meeting longer term targets in Ireland. The resource, particularly the wave energy resource, is vast. Before these technologies become commercially viable researchers and developers must overcome the challenge of developing low cost, highly reliable, integrated systems. Given current efforts to develop technology, ocean energy may be deployed in small scale demonstrations by 2010; however it is not expected to contribute significantly to Ireland’s electricity supply before 2020. It is proposed to implement an ocean energy strategy to advance the speed at which ocean energy technologies are deployed in Ireland by increasing the capacity for research and development, both within academic institutions and commercial entities developing devices in Ireland. A structured and phased strategy of development supports may enable Ireland to utilize its ocean energy resource within a decade. The result could also see Ireland positioned with the potential to become a world leader in the manufacture and use of ocean energy systems.
    • Options for the Development of Wave Energy in Ireland: A Public Consultation Document

      Marine Institute; Sustainable Energy Ireland (Marine Institute, 2002)
      The potential for development of wave, ocean current and tidal energy is the subject of growing international investigation. This document focuses on the status and development potential of wave energy in Ireland. While recognising that this technology is not in a position to contribute to national renewable energy targets within the Kyoto timeframe, it is oriented towards the longer term prospect of Ireland becoming a world-leading developer and manufacturer of the technologies that will enable the harnessing of ocean energy resources.
    • The Status of Ireland's Climate, 2012

      Dwyer, N. (Environmental Protection Agency, 2013)
      Ireland’s climate is changing. This is consistent with regional and global trends which display rapid changes in many aspects of climate over the last century and the first decade of this century. The availability of high-quality climate observations is a critical starting point from which an understanding of past and emerging trends in the current climate can be developed. Such observations are vital for detecting change and providing the information needed to help manage and plan for the future in a wide range of socio-economic sectors. Observations are also essential to help build robust projections of future climate, which can in turn inform policy formulation for appropriate mitigation and adaptation measures. Such measures should help us limit the negative socio-economic impacts and position us to take advantages of opportunities offered by a changing climate. This report brings together observational information and data for over 40 climate variables and highlights changes and trends in aspects of Irish climate across the atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial domains. The observations presented in this report contribute to the formulation of the Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) as defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS).
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report I: Intertidal and Subtidal Muds.

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites. This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of intertidal and subtidal mud habitats and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report II: Intertidal and Subtidal Sands

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites.This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of intertidal and subtidal sand habitats and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report III: Intertidal and Subtidal Muddy Sands and Sandy Muds

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites. This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of vegetation dominated communities (Saltmarsh and seagrass) and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report IV: Intertidal and Subtidal Mixed Sediments

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites. This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of intertidal and subtidal mixed sediments habitats and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report V: Intertidal and Subtidal Coarse Sediments

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites. This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of coarse sediments and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report VI: Biogenic Reefs (Sabellaria, Native Oyster, Maerl).

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites. This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of Biogenic Reefs (Sabellaria, Native Oyster, Maerl)and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report VII: Intertidal and Subtidal Reefs.

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites. This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of littoral and sublittoral reefs and associated biological assemblages and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Tools for Appropriate Assessment of Fishing and Aquaculture Activities in Marine and Coastal Natura 2000 Sites. Report VIII: Vegetation Dominated Communities (Saltmarsh and Seagrass).

      ABPmer (ABP Marine Environmental Research Ltd, 2013)
      Ireland has many coastal and marine habitats and species that are of national and international conservation importance. The value of these has been recognised by the designation of a number of Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas through the EU Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC) and EU Birds Directive (2009/147/EC). Together these sites form part of the European network of Natura 2000 sites. This report and accompanying annexes is part of a series of documents that present a risk assessment tool developed by ABPmer to assess the effects of fishing and aquaculture activities on the Annex I habitats and Annex II species present in Natura 2000 sites. The tool is designed to support the preparation of screening statements and Appropriate Assessments. Specifically this report presents the project deliverables for the assessment of vegetation dominated communities (saltmarsh and seagrass)and describes the potential use of the risk assessment tool.
    • Veterinary treatments and other substances used in finfish aquaculture in Ireland

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2007)
      Over recent years the finfish aquaculture sector has contracted in Ireland. The bulk of this sector is accounted for by marine salmon production. A number of substances are used in finfish farming that may give rise to discharges to the aquatic environment.
    • Water-based Tourism - A Strategic Vision for Galway

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2002)
      Water-based Tourism – A Strategic Vision for Galway is a report commissioned by a consortium of Agencies in collaboration with Ireland West Tourism. The terms of reference were to undertake a study which would: - evaluate the potential to develop the water-based tourism and leisure resource in Galway City and County; - identify the potential and provide a development strategy for at least six pilot water-based tourism and leisure initiatives in selected geographic locations throughout Galway; - recommend further phased development options which would enhance and sustain economic progress of the water-based tourism and leisure sector in Galway. Tourism Development International were contracted to undertake the study, the results of which are presented in this report.
    • Water-based Tourism and Leisure Product Audit 2006

      Huskyes, E; O'Connor, K (Marine Institute, 2006)
      In consultation with key agencies and stakeholders, the Marine Institute is drafting a Development Strategy for the marine/water-based tourism and leisure sector for the period 2007-2013. Preparation and research for this has involved the completion of a Water-based Tourism and Leisure Product Audit. The Institute worked in collaboration with Royal Haskoning, spatial planning consultants, and Kevin O’Connor, Donegal County Council, to complete the audit. The objective of the audit is to systematically assess the quantity and quality of Ireland’s waterbased tourism and leisure products and to identify product gaps and opportunities at local, regional and national level with a view to informing policy and investment decisions.