• Proceedings of the 2nd IWDG International Whale Conference. Muc Mhara Ireland's Smallest Whale

      Berrow, S D (ed); Deegan, B (ed) (Irish Whale and Dolphin Group, 2010)
      Muc Mhara – Ireland’s smallest whale. Proceedings of the 2nd Irish Whale and Dolphin Group International Whale Conference. Papers presented include, “Introduction: The harbour porpoise or Muc Mhara”, “An Irish name for the humble harbour porpoise”, “Life in the Fast Lane: Ecology and Behaviour of harbour porpoises in the Gulf of Maine”, “The ecology of harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) in Irish waters: what strandings programmes tell us.”, “Passive acoustic monitoring of the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) in Irish waters”, “Abundance estimates of harbour porpoises in Irish waters”, “Satellite tracking of harbour porpoises in European Waters”, “Satellite tracking of harbour porpoises in European Waters”, “A cost of green energy: Are offshore renewables: a threat to porpoises?”, “Harbour porpoise populations and protection in an EU context”, “Assessment of Acoustic Deterrent Devices ‘Pingers’ and porpoise by catch rates in Irish Gillnet Fisheries in the Celtic Sea” and “Harbour porpoise Conservation in the Republic of Ireland”.
    • Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Molluscan Shellfish Safety

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2006)
      The aim of the global series of ICMSS Conferences has been well defined by our colleagues in Santiago de Compostela (Spain) who hosted the previous Conference in June 2002: “To establish a forum where useful, enriching debate and interchange of knowledge flow easily on a broad spectrum in the area of Shellfish Safety”. The ICMSS 04 Programme followed on the tradition and patterns which were set in Santiago de Compostela (2002); Southampton, New York, USA (2000) and in The Philippines (1998) of thematic sessions on a multi-disciplinary basis. Our session topics included: • Microbiological Status of Shellfish • Shellfish Viruses and Pathogens • Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) and Biotoxin Contamination • HAB Mitigation and Depuration • Toxicology of Shellfish Toxins • Current and Emerging Analytical Methods • Quality Assurance and Consumer Safety • Regulation and Management of Shellfish Safety • Role of Industry in Risk Management and Innovation
    • Proceedings of the Fourth Irish Marine Biotoxin Science Workshop

      Marine Institute; Bord Iascaigh Mhara; Irish Shellfish Association; Food Safety Authority of Ireland (Marine Institute, 2003)
      The workshop is part of the Marine Institute’s role as the National Reference Laboratory for Marine Biotoxins in Ireland. This workshop is an annual event, where scientists, regulators and shellfish farmers meet to review developments in the monitoring and research of Biotoxins in Ireland and internationally. Our specific objectives for the 2003 Workshop are: (1) Review the Irish Biotoxin Monitoring system and to assess the trends in toxicity during 2003; (2) Summarise current Irish research work in Harmful Algal Blooms and Phytoplankton; (3) Focus on research work in Killary Harbour under the BOHAB project; (4) Take stock of developments and provide a forum for debate/feedback.
    • Proceedings of the Second Irish Marine Biotoxin Science Workshop

      Marine Institute; Bord Iascaigh Mhara (Marine Institute, 2001)
      The Marine Institute’s objectives for Irish Biotoxin programme are to support the continued development of the Irish Shellfish Industry and to promote food safety, by building the best Biotoxin Management System in the Northern Hemisphere. The Marine Science Biotoxin Workshops are part of Marine Institute’s role as the National Reference Laboratory. The EU mandate for Reference Labs emphasises the need for dissemination of information. The objectives of the Marine Science Biotoxin Workshop are: (1) Take Stock of developments since last Workshop, April 2000; (2) Review Irish Monitoring System & Trends; (3) Summarise current Irish Research in HAE/Phytoplankton; (4) Compare with International Best Practice in New Zealand and USA; (5) Provide a Forum for Debate/Feedback
    • Proceedings of the Third Irish Marine Biotoxin Science Workshop

      Marine Institute; Bord Iascaigh Mhara; Food Safety Authority of Ireland (Marine Institute, 2002)
      The workshop is part of the Marine Institute’s role as the National Reference Laboratory for Marine Biotoxins in Ireland. This initiative was started in 2000 and was modelled on the Marine Science Biotoxin workshops, which have taken place in New Zealand since 1994. This workshop is an annual event, where scientists, regulators and shellfish farmers meet to review developments in the monitoring and research of Biotoxins in Ireland and internationally. The Institute’s roles are to Monitor/Research/Advise/Communicate. These are inextricably linked. It is essential to carry out targeted research in order to answer the questions which are generated by the monitoring. Objectives of the 2002 workshop: 1. To review the Irish Biotoxin Monitoring programme in 2002; 2. To summarise current and proposed new Irish research in the areas of Biotoxins and Harmful Algal Events (HAE’s); 3. To provide an International view on Biotoxins issues, with invited speakers from France, Norway and the UK; 4. To provide a forum for debate and communications.
    • Spring salmon enhancement on the Delphi Fishery, Ireland

      McDermott, T. J.; Willis, S. E.; Mantle, P. (Atlantic Salmon Trust, 1996)
      This paper summarises the results of an Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) enhancement programme on the Delphi Fishery in the west of Ireland between 1991 and 1995. The aim of the programme was to increase salmon rod catches in the wake of a sea trout stock collapse. Smolts from two other Irish rivers, Burrishoole and Corrib, were released alongside Delphi fish and differentially tagged. Record angling catches were subsequently recorded. Catch rates varied from 0.6 to 12.7 per 1,000 smolts released. The comparative performance of the different stocks is assessed, with significant differences emerging between the stocks and between year classes In terms of survival/exploitation rates, run limes, sex ratios and homing patterns. The Delphi fish produced consistently lower overall returns than the Burrishoole groups, but consistently much higher numbers of early-running multi-sea-winter (MSW) salmon. These MSW salmon were predominantly female, while Delphi grilse were predominantly male. The Corrib fish performed relatively poorly. The smaller MSW salmon component of the non-indigenous groups ran later in the season than their Delphi counterparts. Important size differences in adult returns were noted and related to stock, sex, husbandry and selection by interceptory fisheries. It is suggested that the MSW salmon component of Delphi stocks is attributable to genetic factors, possibly linked to low freshwater temperature regimes. The programme has contributed to an increase in estuarine droll netting. Exploitation of grilse by all forms of coastal net ranged from 56% to 87%. Exploitation of MSW salmon by nets was lower, ranging from 0% to 54%, the lowest rates being achieved by the early-running Delphi MSW salmon. The programme is expensive and cannot be justified in terms of direct angling revenue. But when related accommodation income is taken into account, the financial results and the sustainment of the fishery's capital value broadly justify the programme to date.