• Length-Weight Relationships, Fat Content and Parasitic Infestation of Irish Mackerel

      McArdle, E; Barnwall, E; Nolan, F (Department of Fisheries and Forestry, 1985)
      Landings of mackerel by Irish vessels have increased dramatically in recent years. The total catch in 1982 amounted to 110,000 tonnes which was valued at about 8.5 million pounds, compared with only 8,500 tonnes, values at 0.36 million pounds in 1974. The major cause of the increase has been the introduction of six large trawlers into the fleet around 1980 as a result of which the total catch jumped from 24,000 tonnes in 1979 to 80,000 tonnes in 1980. The main landings into Irish ports are made at Killybegs and Rathmullen, while smaller landings are made into Castletownbere and Galway. Since 1983 considerable quantities have also been landed into western Scottish ports. Most of the catches are taken off the west and northwest coast but again since 1983 the Irish fleet has successfully fished over a wide area extending from west of the Shetland Islands down to Cornwall.
    • Levels of metals and organic contaminants in mussels Mytilus edulis from Cork Harbour - 1989

      Boelens, R G; Nixon, E R; McLaughlin, D (Department of the Marine, 1990-07)
      This study of contaminants in mussels from outer Cork Harbour (Buoy no. 8) has shown that the levels of selected metals and organochlorine substances are generally low and at the lower end of the ranges measured in recent surveys of mussel populations at other European coastal sites.
    • List of Fishery Leaflets Nos. 1 (1938) to 111 (1981)

      Anon. (Department of Fisheries and Forestry (Trade and Information Section), 1981)
      These leaflets provide a medium for distributing information on various aspects of fishery research and development undertaken by Officers of the Department. 111 leaflets have been published to date (December, 1981). A list is attached.
    • List of Fishery Leaflets Numbers 1 (1938) to 50 (1973)

      Anon. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1973)
      These Leaflets provide a medium for distributing information on various aspects of fishery research and development undertaken by officers of the Department. 50 Leaflets have been published to date (May 1973). A list is attached.
    • List of fishery leaflets numbers 1 (1938) to 58 (1973)

      Anon. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1974)
      These Leaflets provide a medium for distributing information on various aspects of fishery research and development undertaken by officers of the Department. 58 Leaflets have been published to date (January 1974). A list is attached.
    • A List of Scientific and Engineering Papers by Members of the Staff of the Fisheries Division of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries 1950-1970

      Anon. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1972)
      The Fisheries Division of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries conducts researches into many aspects of Irish fishes, fishing and fisheries and a considerable number of papers on a wide range of topics have been published over the years in a number of journals including special publications of the Department, namely Irish Fisheries Investigations Series A (Freshwater) and Series B (Marine) and Fishery Leaflets. The present leaflet gives details of papers published by members, or former members, of the Department’s staff since 1950, as a result of their official work or arising there from. In addition to the papers mentioned below members of the Department's staff have contributed to various international bodies other papers, which have not been published subsequently. The list does not, however, include papers prepared by members of the Department's staff, whilst on secondment to semi-state bodies. Some of the authors have now left the service of the Department and details are given as necessary in the following list, Details are also given of the joint authors who were never in the service of the Department.
    • List of some historical papers etc. on Irish fish, fishing and fisheries 1940-1974

      Went, A E J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1978)
      Since 1940 I have had a keen interest in the history of fish, fishing and fisheries in Ireland and in my capacity as an inspector of fisheries I had an unrivalled opportunity, in my travels around the country, to acquire information on fishing methods, which were becoming, or even had became obsolete. For example, when I was preparing my second paper on the Galway Fishery (No. 6 on list below) I made inquiries at the National Museum, Dublin as to what Irish fishing spears were preserved in that museum. I was surprised to learn that very little material of this kind was available, although I knew that “hoards” of salmon spears, seized by the Boards of Fishery Conservators, were kept in various parts of Ireland. Fortunately I was able to have these, and other spears, mainly for eels, collected up and deposited in the National Museum, which can now claim to have a good representative collection of Irish traditional fishing spears for salmon and eels. My paper on Irish fishing spears (No. 29 on list below) resulted from the collection of the fishing spears referred to above. Articles in newspapers and other popular journals have generally been omitted from the list below, because they were usually based on information given in contributions to the journals etc. of learned and other societies. This list also does not include details of papers on the scientific aspects of Irish fisheries, details of which have already been published in Fishery Leaflet No. 25.
    • Lobster Trap Census 1968

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1969)
      A census made in July and in September, 1968 of the number of traps used in the Irish lobster fishery has been used in this paper as the basis for an analysis of lobster catch. The catch figures supplied to the Fisheries Division by various collectors have been correlated with the gear used in the 12 maritime counties involved.
    • Lobster Trap Census 1969

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1970)
      This leaflet adds to the information given in Fishery Leaflet No. 11 (Gibson, 1969) concerning lobster traps used around the Irish coasts in 1968. The catch figures supplied to the Fisheries Division by various collectors have been correlated with the lobster gear used by boats fishing off the 12 maritime counties. The purpose of these continuing records is to provide an annual measure of the effects of fishing upon lobster stocks and thereby to analyse trends in the landings, by comparing annual catch and effort.
    • Lobster Trap Census 1971

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1972)
      This leaflet continues the information provided by Fisheries Leaflets 11, 23 and 26. There was little change in the types of Lobster fishing gear in use in 1971 compared with previous years.
    • Lobster trap census 1972

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1973)
      This leaflet continues the information provided by Fishery Leaflets Nos. 11, 23, 26, and 39. There was little change in the types of Lobster fishing gear in use in 1972 compared with previous years.
    • Lobster Trap Census, 1970

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1971)
      This leaflet continues the information given in Fishery Leaflets No. 11 and 23 concerning lobster traps in use around the Irish coasts. As in previous years the lobster catch figures supplied to the Fisheries Division by various collectors have been correlated with the fishing gear used by boats fishing off the 12 maritime counties. There was little change in 1970 in the preference of the fishermen for the different designs of fishing traps used.
    • Lobster trap census, 1973

      Bhatnagar, K M (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1974)
      This leaflet continues the information provided by Fishery Leaflets numbered, 11, 23, 26, 39, and 57. Although more lobster traps (51.0%) were used in relation to French crawfish, (49.0%) in 1973 (Table 1), the order of preference of lobster fishing (all types) remained the same as in previous years as follows: (a) French crawfish traps (b) Scottish creels (or variation thereof) (c) Other types of traps.
    • Making more money from Periwinkles

      Crowley, M (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1975)
      Each year about £250,000 worth of periwinkles are picked on our shores. This makes them far and away the most valuable molluscs in our fishing industry. What is more, the value might be doubled if the catch were to be handled carefully. The fact is that, although they appear very tough, the periwinkle are in some ways delicate animals and rough treatment kills many of them. An important fact in the periwinkle industry is that the resource is a natural one which costs little to exploit. No equipment is required to harvest them because they are simply picked by hand when the tide is out.
    • Mariculture in Ireland. Policies and Problems.

      Went, A E J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1975)
      Mariculture in Ireland up to 1974 was restricted to the flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and mussel (Mytilus edulis) but since that year rearing of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the sea and of some other species has been undertaken on an experimental basis. Because the fisheries in tidal waters and in the sea are, with some exceptions, vested in the public, legal difficulties can arise in many areas. Some of these legal difficulties in the case of the flat oyster, mussel, cockle (Cardium edule) and periwinkle (Littorina littorea) can be resolved by actions under the Irish Fisheries Acts but with other species new legislation is required for certain forms of activity. Problems can also arise in connection with the supply of stock for rearing purposes. Stringent regulations are in force regarding the importation of aquatic animals generally with a view to barring those animals which may have an adverse effect on existing stocks of fish or may lead to the introduction of diseases and parasites not already in the country.
    • Mercury concentration in fish from Irish waters in 1992

      Nixon, E; Rowe, A; McLaughlin, D (Department of the Marine, 1993-08)
      Fish landed at the major Irish ports and molluscs from the main growing areas were sampled during 1992 and analysed for total mercury content. Concentrations in fish species ranged from 0.015 to 1.02 mg/kg wet weight with a mean of 0.1, while in shellfish the concentrations were lower and ranged from 0.005 to 0.049 with a mean of 0.026. The mercury levels recorded in all fish sampled were within the standards for human health applied by the contracting parties to the Oslo and Paris Convention (OSPARCOM). The mean mercury concentrations in only two samples, redfish and crawfish from the west coast, showed levels close to the limit. These species are generally offshore and levels are associated with naturally-occurring mercury rather than with human activity. The survey confirms that Irish seafish of all kinds are effectively free from mercury contamination.
    • Mercury concentration in fish from Irish waters in 1993

      Nixon, E; Rowe, A; McLoughlin, D (Department of the Marine, 1994-11)
      During 1993, a total of 81 samples, covering 18 finfish and 4 shellfish species were collected and the edible portion analysed for total mercury content in accordance with the European Commission's Decision of 19 May 1993. In finfish the concentration of mercury ranged from 0.01 to 0.39 with a mean of 0.10 and in shellfish the concentration also ranged from 0.01 to 0.39 but with a mean of 0.04µg/g wet weight. These levels are low and are well within the maximum limits set by the EC for mercury in fisheries products. The total mercury concentration in Irish shellfish is very low and is generally low in the commercial catch landed at Irish ports. This survey confirms previous studies that show Irish seafoods are effectively free from mercury contamination.
    • Mercury Concentrations in Fish from Irish Waters in 1994

      Nixon, E; Rowe, A; McLaughlin, D (Department of the Marine, 1995-09)
      During 1994, a total of 65 samples, covering the commercially important fish and shellfish species, were collected and the edible portion analysed for total mercury content in accordance with the European Commission's Decision of 19 May 1993. In fish, including prawns, the concentration of mercury ranged from 0.01 to 0.21 with a mean of 0.06 and in shellfish from 0.01 to 0.13 with a mean of 0.04mg/kg wet weight. These levels are low and are well within the maximum limits, 0.05mg/kg wet weight, set by the EC for mercury in fisheries products. This survey confirms previous studies that show Irish seafoods are effectively free from mercury contamination.
    • Metal and Organo-Chlorine Concentrations in Fin-Fish from Irish Waters in 1995

      Rowe, A; Nixon, E; McGovern, E; McManus, M; Smyth, M (Marine Institute, 1998-02)
      During 1995 a total of 44 samples taken from 16 different species of fin-fish were collected from five Irish fishing ports and analysed for total mercury content in the edible tissue, in accordance with the European Commission's Decision of 19 May 1993. The concentration of mercury ranged from 0.03 to 0.28 with a mean of 0.09µg/g wet weight. These levels are low and are well within the maximum limits set by the EC for mercury in fisheries products. This survey confirms previous studies that show Irish seafoods are effectively free from mercury contamination. In addition a number of samples were also analysed for cadmium, copper, lead, zinc, chromium and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Although there are no EU guidelines or standards for these additional contaminants, the levels are well below the strictest standards or guidance values applied by Contracting Parties of the Oslo and Paris Conventions.
    • Monitoring of Shellfish Growing Areas - 1993

      Nixon, E.; Rowe, A.; Smith, M.; McLoughlin, D.; Silke, J. (Department of the Marine, 1994-08)
      During 1993, water and shellfish from 19 major growing areas were monitored for chemical parameters in accordance with the 1979 Council Directive 79/923/EC. At each site temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and suspended solids measurements were taken and shellfish samples were returned to the laboratory for metal, chlorinated hydrocarbon and algal biotoxin determinations. Generally, water quality in all areas was good and conformed to the guidelines of the Directive. The highest levels of metals recorded were: cadmium in Tralee Bay (0.4 to 0.7µg/g) and Carlingford Lough (0.3 to 0.7µg/g) and lead in Wexford Harbour (0.5µg/g). Mercury in all cases was low with the exception of Cromane during November when levels of 0.3µg/g were detected. Chlorinated hydrocarbons levels were extremely low and indicate the clean nature of Irish shellfish, unpolluted by these synthetic organic compounds. Algal biotoxins were not detected in any samples.