• Salmon Mortalities at Inver Bay and McSwyne’s Bay Finfish farms, County Donegal, Ireland, during 2003

      Cronin, M.; Cusack, C.; Geoghegan, F.; Jackson, D.; McGovern, E.; McMahon, T.; O'Beirn, F.X.; Ó Cinneide, M.; Silke, J. (Marine Institute, 2004)
      This report details the investigations into a major mortality of farmed salmon at Inver Bay and McSwyne’s Bay, Co. Donegal in July 2003. Previous reports were provided on 29th July 2003 and on 11th August 2003. The information is based upon analysis and research by MI scientists, a review of environmental data, survey reports by external consultants, inputs from veterinary practitioners who visited the site, reports from DCMNR staff in Killybegs, and site visits made by DCMNR / MI inspectors. Following a review meeting of the principal investigators on the 9th October, 2003, MI proceeded to carry out further scientific investigations. DCMNR also commissioned Kirk McClure Morton Consulting Engineers (KMM) to carry out a parallel investigation of the mortalities at Inver Bay and McSwynes Bay salmon farms. MI provided support as required to the KMM study, the report for which was furnished to DCMNR and MI on 11 February 2004. (KMM, 2004) MI wishes to acknowledge the high level of co-operation and assistance that it received from the owners and staff of Creevin Fish Farm Ltd, Eany Fish Products Ltd and Ocean Farms Ltd. It also wishes to acknowledge the assistance of veterinary practitioners, DCMNR staff and others in the course of this investigation.
    • Survival and growth of juvenile freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in a recirculating aquaculture system

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Neves, R.J.; Steg, M.B. (American Malacological Union, 1998)
      An indoor recirculating aquaculture system was constructed to provide suitable conditions to culture juvenile freshwater mussels. In the first of three growth trials, Villosa iris (I. Lea, 1829) juveniles were cultured for 22 wk, and grew from an initial mean length of 0.4 mm to 2.7 mm. Survival was 26.8% overall. In the second trial, growth and survival were compared between juveniles of V. iris held in sediment and without sediment. The initial mean length of both groups was 2.7 mm, and this experiment ran for 17 wk. The juvenile mussels in sediment grew to a mean length of 5.7 mm with 85% survival, significantly greater (p < 0.01) than juveniles held without sediment (4.5 mm, 74% survival). In the third trial, two cohorts of juvenile Lampsilis fasciola Rafinesque, 1815, increased in length from I.I mm and 1.4 mm to 3.3 mm and 4.1 mm, respectively, with comparable survival (78.7% versus 64.5%). Results of these trials demonstrate that juvenile mussels can be reared successfully within recirculating systems. One of the factors deemed important in successful culture is continuous feeding of an appropriate food source. In this study, a unialgal culture of Neochloris oleabundans Chantanachat and Bold, 1962, was used throughout. Regular cleaning of the system and water replacement also was important. Finally, the culture of juveniles in sediment appears to be an important factor in ensuring good growth and survival. This phenomenon could be related to pedal feeding behavior, proper orientation of the mussels for filtering efficiency, or stability from physical disturbance.
    • Toward design criteria in constructed oyster reefs: oyster recruitment as a function of substrate type and tidal height

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Luchenbach, M.W.; Nestlerode, J.A.; Coates, G.M. (National Shellfisheries Association, 2000)
      Restoration of degraded oyster reef habitat generally begins with the addition of substrate that serves as a reef base and site for oyster spat attachment. Remarkably, little is known about how substrate type and reef morphology affect the development of oyster populations on restored reefs. Three-dimensional, intertidal reefs were constructed near Fisherman's Island, Virginia: two reefs in 1995 using surfclam (Spisula solidissima) shell and six reefs in 1996 using surfclam shell, oyster shell, and stabilized coal ash. We have monitored oyster recruitment and growth quarterly at three tidal heights (intertidal, mean low water, and subtidal) on each reef type since their construction. Oyster recruitment in 1995 exceeded that observed in the two subsequent years. High initial densities on the 1995 reefs decreased and stabilized at a mean of 418 oyster/m2. Oyster settlement occurred on all reef types and tidal heights in 1996; however, postsettlement mortality on the surfclam shell and coal ash reefs exceeded that on the oyster shell reefs, which remained relatively constant throughout the year (mean = 935 oysters/m2). Field observations suggest that predation accounts for most of the observed mortality and that the clam shell and coal ash reefs, which have little interstitial space, suffer greater predation. Oyster abundance was consistently greatest higher in the intertidal zone on all reefs in each year studied. The patterns observed here lead to the preliminary conclusion that the provision of spatial refugia (both intertidal and interstitial) from predation is an essential feature of successful oyster reef restoration in this region. In addition, high levels of recruitment can provide a numerical refuge, whereby the oysters themselves will provide structure and increase the probability of an oyster population establishing successfully on the reef.