• Developments in analysis and toxicology of toxaphene compounds

      de Geus, H-J.; Besselink, H.; Brouwer, A.; Klungsøyr, J.; MacGovern, E.; MacHugh, B.; Nixon, E.; Rimkus, G.G.; Wester, P.G.; de Boer, J. (1998)
      Over the last 50 years toxaphene has been produced and used as a pesticide extensively. The US Environmental Protection Agency banned it in 1982. In the early 1990s the presence of toxaphene in marine fish in Europe caused concern with regard to human health in relation with consumption. This paper gives a brief overview of recent developments in the analytical and toxicological research on toxaphene.
    • Environmental occurrence, analysis, and toxicology of toxaphene compounds

      de Geus, H.-J.; Besselink, H.; Brouwer, A.; Klungsøyr, J.; McHugh, B.; Nixon, E.; Rimkus, G.G.; Wester, P.G.; de Boer, J. (1999)
      Toxaphene production, in quantities similar to those of polychlorinated biphenyls, has resulted in high toxaphene levels in fish from the Great Lakes and in Arctic marine mammals (up to 10 and 16 microg g-1 lipid). Because of the large variabiliity in total toxaphene data, few reliable conclusions can be drawn about trends or geographic differences in toxaphene concentrations. New developments in mass spectrometric detection using either negative chemical ionization or electron impact modes as well as in multidimensional gas chromatography have recently led researchers to suggest congener-specific approaches. Several nomenclature systems have been developed for toxaphene compounds. Although all systems have specific advantages and limitations, it is suggested that an international body, such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, make an attempt to obtain uniformity in the literature. Toxicologic information on individual chlorobornanes is scarce, but some reports have recently appeared. Neurotoxic effects of toxaphene exposure such as those on behavior and learning have been reported. Technical toxaphene and some individual congeners were found to be weakly estrogenic in in vitro test systems; no evidence for endocrine effects in vivo has been reported. In vitro studies show technical toxaphene and toxaphene congeners to be mutagenic. However, in vivo studies have not shown genotoxicity; therefore, a nongenotoxic mechanism is proposed. Nevertheless, toxaphene is believed to present a potential carcinogenic risk to humans. Until now, only Germany has established a legal tolerance level for toxaphene--0.1 mg kg-1 wet weight for fish.
    • MATT: Monitoring, Analysis and Toxicity of Toxaphene: improvement of analytical methods

      de Boer, J.; Klungsøyr, J.; Nesje, G.; Meier, S.; McHugh, B.; Nixon, E.; Rimkus, G.G. (1999)
      The European Research Project MATT (Investigation into the Monitoring, Analysis and Toxicity of Toxaphene) started in 1997 and had the objective to provide information on toxicological risks to the consumer of toxaphene residues in fish from European waters. This report includes information on the analytical block of the project, which comprised three studies.
    • Survey of toxaphene concentrations in fish from European waters

      McHugh, B.; Nixon, E.; Klungsoyr, J.; Besselink, H.; Brouwer, A.; Rimkus, G.; Leonards, P.; de Boer, J. (2000)
      Toxaphene, a suspected carcinogen, is a broad spectrum chlorinated pesticide. The objective of this study was to provide information on the toxicological risks posed by toxaphene to the consumer of fish from European waters. The levels of 3 toxaphene congeners in various fish species from different geographical locations were determined. These data were then used to provide information on the exposure of toxaphene to the consumer of fish.
    • Toxicological risks to humans of toxaphene residues in fish

      Leonards, P.E.G.; Besselink, H.; Klungsøyr, J.; McHugh, B.; Nixon, E.; Rimkus, G.G.; Brouwer, A.; de Boer, J. (Wiley, 2011)
      A revised risk assessment for toxaphene was developed, based on the assumption that fish consumers are only exposed to toxaphene residues that differ substantially from technical toxaphene due to environmental degradation and metabolism. In vitro studies confirmed that both technical toxaphene and degraded toxaphene inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication that correlates with the mechanistic potential to cause tumour promotion. In vivo rat studies established the NOAEL for degraded and technical toxaphene at the highest dose tested in the bioassay. Toxaphene residue intakes from European fishery products were estimated and compared to the provisional tolerable daily intakes (TDIs) from various regulatory agencies including Canada, the United States, Germany. The estimated intake was also compared to a new calculated provisional MATT pTDI. The MATT pTDI is based upon new toxicological information (in vivo rat studies) developed on a model for environmental toxaphene residues rather than technical toxaphene. A MATT pTDI (1.08 mg total toxaphene for a person of 60 kg) for tumour promotion potency was adopted for use in Europe and is hitherto referred to as the MATT pTDI. These new data result in a better estimate of safety and a higher TDI than previously used. Based on realistic fish consumption data and recent baseline concentration data of toxaphene in European fishery products the toxaphene intake for the consumers of Germany, Ireland, Norway and The Netherlands was estimated. For an average adult fish consumer the average daily intake of toxaphene was estimated to be 1.2 µg, and 0.4, 0.5, and 0.2 µg for the consumers of Norway, Germany, Ireland, and The Netherlands, respectively. The toxaphene intake of these average fish consumers was far below the MATT pTDI of 1.08 mg/60 kg body weight. In conclusion, based on the most relevant toxicological studies and the most realistic estimates of fish consumption and recent concentrations of toxaphene in European fishery products, adverse health effects are unlikely for the average European consumer of fishery products. In no case is the MATT pTDI exceeded.