• An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

      Cranford, P.J.; Kamermans, P.; Krause, G.; Mazurié, J.; Buck, B.H.; Dolmer, P.; Fraser, D.; Van Nieuwenhove, K.; O'Beirn, F.X.; Sanchez-Mata, A.; Thorarinsdóttir, G.G.; Strand, O. (Inter Research, 2012)
      An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social and ecological systems, marine regulators require an ecosystem-based decision framework that structures and integrates the relationships between these systems and facilitates communication of aquaculture–environment interactions and policy-related developments and decisions. The Drivers-Pressures-State Change-Impact-Response (DPSIR) management framework incorporates the connectivity between human and ecological issues and would permit available performance indicators to be identified and organized in a manner that facilitates different regulatory needs. Suitable performance indicators and modeling approaches, which are used to assess DPSIR framework components, are reviewed with a focus on the key environmental issues associated with bivalve farming. Indicator selection criteria are provided to facilitate constraining the number of indicators within the management framework. It is recommended that an ecosystem-based approach for bivalve aquaculture be based on a tiered indicator monitoring system that is structured on the principle that increased environmental risk requires increased monitoring effort. More than 1 threshold for each indicator would permit implementation of predetermined impact prevention and mitigation measures prior to reaching an unacceptable ecological state. We provide an example of a tiered monitoring program that would communicate knowledge to decision-makers on ecosystem State Change and Impact components of the DPSIR framework.
    • Embryonic and larval development of Spisula solidissima similis (Say, 1822) (Bivalvia: Mactridae)

      Walker, R.L.; O'Beirn, F.X. (California Malacozoological Society, 1996)
      Larvae of the southern surf clam, Spisula solidissima similis (Say, 1822), were reared in the laboratory at a salinity of 25 ppt and a temperature of 20-22°C through the embryonic and early larval development period. Unfertilized eggs averaged 58.5 ± 0.32 (SE) μm, with the size-frequency of eggs being normal. First polar body was observed 22 minutes after fertilization with 50% of eggs exhibiting polar bodies after 26 minutes. Ciliated blastula and trochophore stages occurred at 6 hours and 16.8 hours, respectively. Straight-hinge veligers appeared 39.2 hours after fertilization. Larvae grew to a mean size of 172 μmin the pediveliger phase (range 119 to 212 μm). Larvae were exhibiting active foot-probing by day 8 and continued to do so until day 13 when the cultures suffered heavy mortalities. Early life-history traits of Spisula solidissima similis larvae are compared to those for Spisula solidissima solidissima and Spisula sachalinensis.
    • Enhancement of subtidal eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, recruitment using mesh bag enclosures

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Walker, R.L.; Heffernan, P.B. (National Shellfisheries Association, 1996)
      Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in the southeastern United States are found predominantly in the intertidal zone. In this study, mesh bags (3 and 6 mm) were deployed over collecting frames, and the patterns of oyster settlement on these collectors were compared against unmeshed controls at three tidal heights (intertidal, low water, and subtidal) over three sampling regimes (biweekly, monthly, and seasonal) at two sites. Within the biweekly sampling regime, the meshed collectors and controls had similar patterns of settlement at the respective tidal heights. For monthly samplers, mesh treatments maintained higher settlement subtidally whereas controls had highest settlement on the collectors at mean low-water level. Controls had highest recruitment intertidally for seasonal collectors, whereas mesh treatments had higher recruitment lower in the intertidal zone. Conclusions from this experiment were that the use of mesh-covered collectors enhanced subtidal oyster recruitment. Causes of observed increases in subtidal settlement in mesh collectors over unmeshed controls over time could be the result of a combination of factors: predator exclusion, larval entrainment, or reduced desiccation, which seemed to overcome the detrimental effects of increased fouling, resulting in reduced flow and possible hypoxic conditions within the mesh bags. Given the degree of recruitment and the sizes of the recruits attained within the mesh bags, the use of these methods to attain juveniles for commercial purposes would appear to be both feasible and viable, particularly for long periods (up to 6 1110) of deployment.
    • Environmental factors associated with invasion: modeling occurrence data from a coordinated sampling programme for Pacific oysters

      Kochmann, J.; O’Beirn, F.X.; Yearsley, J.; Crowe, T.P. (Springer Netherlands, 2013)
      Documenting establishment and spread of invasive species requires extensive co-ordinated sampling programmes. Identifying the factors promoting or inhibiting local establishment of an invasive species can improve capacity to predict further spread and underpin strategies to limit spread. Here, a structured sampling programme was used to assess the current distribution of feral populations of Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in Ireland. Sixty-nine sites were sampled using a standardised protocol combining semi-quantitative and quantitative approaches. Sites were chosen to represent variation in proximity to aquaculture and a range of environmental variables. Oyster populations were found at 18 locations, with densities ranging from single individuals to nine individuals per m2. The broad size range of oysters found is indicative of more than one recruitment event. Logistic regression indicated that feral oysters were positively associated with the presence of hard substrata or biogenic reef, long residence times of embayments and large intertidal areas. There was also a tendency for oysters to occur disproportionately in bays with aquaculture, but >500 m from it. Small-scale analysis within sites showed that oysters were almost exclusively attached to hard substrata and mussel shell. The approach taken here provides a rigorous repeatable methodology for future monitoring and a detailed basis for the prediction of further spread.
    • Environmental occurrence, analysis, and toxicology of toxaphene compounds

      de Geus, H.-J.; Besselink, H.; Brouwer, A.; Klungsøyr, J.; McHugh, B.; Nixon, E.; Rimkus, G.G.; Wester, P.G.; de Boer, J. (1999)
      Toxaphene production, in quantities similar to those of polychlorinated biphenyls, has resulted in high toxaphene levels in fish from the Great Lakes and in Arctic marine mammals (up to 10 and 16 microg g-1 lipid). Because of the large variabiliity in total toxaphene data, few reliable conclusions can be drawn about trends or geographic differences in toxaphene concentrations. New developments in mass spectrometric detection using either negative chemical ionization or electron impact modes as well as in multidimensional gas chromatography have recently led researchers to suggest congener-specific approaches. Several nomenclature systems have been developed for toxaphene compounds. Although all systems have specific advantages and limitations, it is suggested that an international body, such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, make an attempt to obtain uniformity in the literature. Toxicologic information on individual chlorobornanes is scarce, but some reports have recently appeared. Neurotoxic effects of toxaphene exposure such as those on behavior and learning have been reported. Technical toxaphene and some individual congeners were found to be weakly estrogenic in in vitro test systems; no evidence for endocrine effects in vivo has been reported. In vitro studies show technical toxaphene and toxaphene congeners to be mutagenic. However, in vivo studies have not shown genotoxicity; therefore, a nongenotoxic mechanism is proposed. Nevertheless, toxaphene is believed to present a potential carcinogenic risk to humans. Until now, only Germany has established a legal tolerance level for toxaphene--0.1 mg kg-1 wet weight for fish.
    • Establishing boundary classes for the classification of UK marine waters using phytoplankton communities

      Devlin, M.; Best, M.; Coates, D.; Bresnan, E.; O'Boyle, S.; Parke, R.; Silke, J.; Cusack, C.; Skeats, J. (Elsevier, 2007)
      This paper presents a description of three of the proposed phytoplankton indices under investigation as part of a classification framework for UK and ROI marine waters. The three indices proposed for the classification process are (i) phytoplankton biomass measured as chlorophyll, (ii) the frequency of elevated phytoplankton counts measuring individual species and total cell counts and (iii) seasonal progression of phytoplankton functional groups through the year. Phytoplankton biomass is calculated by a 90th percentile measurement of chlorophyll over the growing season (April to September) compared to a predetermined reference value. Calculation of functional groups and cell counts are taken as proportional counts derived from the presence of the indicator species or group as compared to the total phytoplankton count. Initial boundary conditions for the assessment of high/good status were tested for each index. Chlorophyll reference conditions were taken from thresholds developed for previous EU directives with the setting of offshore concentrations as a reference condition. Thresholds for elevated counts of phytoplankton taxa were taken from previous EU assessments describing counts that could be impact negatively on the environment. Reference seasonal growth curves are established using phytoplankton counts from ‘‘high status’’ waterbodies. To test the preliminary boundaries for each index, a risk assessment integrating nutrient enrichment and susceptibility for coastal and transitional waters was carried out to identify WFD waterbodies in England and Wales at different levels of risk. Waterbodies assessed as having low or medium risk from nutrient enrichment were identified as type 1 and type 2 waterbodies, and waterbodies assessed as high risk were identified as type 3 waterbodies. Phytoplankton data was extracted from the risk assigned waterbodies and applied to each phytoplankton index to test the robustness of the preliminary classification ranges for each phytoplankton index.
    • Factors affecting the concentration of domoic acid in scallop, Pecten maximus

      Bogan, Y. (2006)
      Domoic acid, a neurotoxin produced by some Pseudo-nitzschia species, can accumulate in shellfish, consumption of which can result in Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning. Since its detection in Irish king scallop, Pecten maximus, regulatory monitoring of toxin levels in product entering the human food chain has been undertaken. Only limited data exist on factors that may influence variability in scallop DA concentration in the field. DA concentration in scallop tissues from a range of sites around Ireland, analysed using HPLC-PDA, exhibited high concentrations in hepatopancreas (max. 3834.4 (μg.g-1), much lower in gonad (max. 61.3 μg.g-1) and even lower concentrations in adductor muscle (max. 31.8 μg.g-1). Toxin concentration in hepatopancreas and scallop size usually exhibited no relationship and there was little support for the hypothesis that shellfish size influenced toxin concentration. DA concentration exhibited site-specific relationships with water depth. Toxin concentration in suspended scallops compared to seabed scallops exhibited a statistically significant difference on only one sampling occasion. Attempts to correlate the occurrence of DA in bivalves with the abundance of cells of Pseudo-nitzschia species were unsuccessful. Given the extent of field variability in DA concentration, a landings-based approach to toxin management rather than an area-based approach would reduce the risks of poisoning.
    • Gill damage to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) caused by the common jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) under experimental challenge

      Baxter, E.J.; Sturt, M.M.; Ruane, N.M.; Doyle, T.K.; McAllen, R.; Harman, L.; Rodger, H.D. (PLoS ONE, 2011)
      Background: Over recent decades jellyfish have caused fish kill events and recurrent gill problems in marine-farmed salmonids. Common jellyfish (Aurelia spp.) are among the most cosmopolitan jellyfish species in the oceans, with populations increasing in many coastal areas. The negative interaction between jellyfish and fish in aquaculture remains a poorly studied area of science. Thus, a recent fish mortality event in Ireland, involving Aurelia aurita, spurred an investigation into the effects of this jellyfish on marine-farmed salmon. Methodology/Principal Findings: To address the in vivo impact of the common jellyfish (A. aurita) on salmonids, we exposed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts to macerated A. aurita for 10 hrs under experimental challenge. Gill tissues of control and experimental treatment groups were scored with a system that rated the damage between 0 and 21 using a range of primary and secondary parameters. Our results revealed that A. aurita rapidly and extensively damaged the gills of S. salar, with the pathogenesis of the disorder progressing even after the jellyfish were removed. After only 2 hrs of exposure, significant multi-focal damage to gill tissues was apparent. The nature and extent of the damage increased up to 48 hrs from the start of the challenge. Although the gills remained extensively damaged at 3 wks from the start of the challenge trial, shortening of the gill lamellae and organisation of the cells indicated an attempt to repair the damage suffered. Conclusions: Our findings clearly demonstrate that A. aurita can cause severe gill problems in marine-farmed fish. With aquaculture predicted to expand worldwide and evidence suggesting that jellyfish populations are increasing in some areas, this threat to aquaculture is of rising concern as significant losses due to jellyfish could be expected to increase in the future.
    • Growth and survival of Spisula solidissima similis larvae fed different rations of Tahitian strain Isochrysis species

      Hurley, D.H.; Walker, R.L.; O'Beirn, F.X. (National Shellfisheries Association, 1997)
      Laboratory-spawned veliger-stage larvae of the southern Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima similis (Say 1822), were reared to late pediveliger stage on five different cell concentrations of Tahitian strain Isochrysis species (T-Iso) to determine an optimal food ration for this subspecies. Larvae were fed daily 0, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000, or 300,000 cells/mL of T-Iso. Day-old veliger larvae were stocked in 150 (1-L) replicate flasks at mean densities of 0.7 or 0.8 larvae/mL for trials A and B, respectively. Larval growth and survival were assessed every 2 days over the 14-day trial penods. Significantly greater growth and survival of larvae occurred in both trials in the lower food rations of 50,000 and 100,000 cells/mL. A reduction in larval growth rate and survival was observed at the higher ration treatments. A decline in overall larval health may be associated with the deliterious effects of surplus ration degradation.
    • Harmful and nuisance algal blooms in Irish coastal waters 1990 - 1993

      Silke, J.; Jackson, D. (ICES, 1993)
      Algal blooms occur naturally around our coast. These high concentrations of planktonic algae are associated with favourable conditions of light and nutrients, and often occur at stratification/ mixing fronts. Many blooms are completely harmless, and form the diet of shellfish and zooplankton. Some colour the water red or brown. A few species are toxic and can cause fish kills or make shellfish unsafe to eat. The Fisheries Research Centre monitors phytoplankton in order to detect any toxic or potentially harmful blooms. The harmful and nuisance algal events from 1990 to 1993 are described.
    • Harmful phytoplankton events caused by variability in the Irish Coastal Current along the west of Ireland

      O'Boyle, S.; Nolan, G.; Raine, R. (UNESCO IOC, 2001)
      Frequent sampling in summer along the western and northwestern coasts of Ireland showed the rapid onshore development of blooms of potentially harmful phytoplankton species. In both 1998 and 1999, concentrations of Gyrodinium cf. aureolum rose by four orders of magnitude to over one million cells per litre in Donegal Bay(northwestern Ireland) in less than 10days. The rapid development of these populations was linked to advection resulting from unfavourable wind-forcing of the Irish Coastal Current (ICG) which runs northwards along the western Irish coast. Current measurements showed that after a particular sequence of changes in wind direction phytoplankton populations could be rapidly advected from areas of slack circulation on the shelf via the ICC into aquaculturally sensitive coastal zones such as Donegal Bay. The model presented is similar to one already demonstrated for the occurrence of toxic events in the bays of southwestern Ireland. Other historical harmful events along the west and northwest coasts relating to substantial losses in both finfish and shellfish culture could also be explained using the model. These include the G. aureolum bloom of 1992, the Prorocentrum balticum bloom in 1997.
    • Histological examination of the gills as a method of detecting asymptomatic carriers of A. Salmonicida in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

      McArdle, J.F.; Dooley-Martyn, C.; McKiernan, F. (European Association of Fish Pathologists, 1986)
    • Identification and Characterization of Cyprinid Herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) Encoded MicroRNAs

      Donohoe, O. H.; Henshilwood, K.; Way, K.; Hakimjavadi, R.; Stone, D. M.; Walls, D. (PLoS ONE, 2015)
      MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Some viruses encode their own miRNAs and these are increasingly being recognized as important modulators of viral and host gene expression. Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is a highly pathogenic agent that causes acute mass mortalities in carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio) and koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) worldwide. Here, bioinformatic analyses of the CyHV-3 genome suggested the presence of non-conserved precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) genes. Deep sequencing of small RNA fractions prepared from in vitro CyHV-3 infections led to the identification of potential miRNAs and miRNA–offset RNAs (moRNAs) derived from some bioinformatically predicted pre-miRNAs. DNA microarray hybridization analysis, Northern blotting and stem-loop RT-qPCR were then used to definitively confirm that CyHV-3 expresses two pre-miRNAs during infection in vitro. The evidence also suggested the presence of an additional four high-probability and two putative viral pre-miRNAs. MiRNAs from the two confirmed pre-miRNAs were also detected in gill tissue from CyHV-3-infected carp. We also present evidence that one confirmed miRNA can regulate the expression of a putative CyHV-3-encoded dUTPase. Candidate homologues of some CyHV-3 pre-miRNAs were identified in CyHV-1 and CyHV-2. This is the first report of miRNA and moRNA genes encoded by members of the Alloherpesviridae family, a group distantly related to the Herpesviridae family. The discovery of these novel CyHV-3 genes may help further our understanding of the biology of this economically important virus and their encoded miRNAs may have potential as biomarkers for the diagnosis of latent CyHV-3.
    • Impact of inter-lab variation on the estimation of epidemiological cut-off values for disc diffusion susceptibility test data for Aeromonas salmonicida

      Smith, P.; Ruane, N.M.; Douglas, I.; Carroll, C.; Kronvall, G.; Fleming, G.T.A. (Elsevier, 2007)
      Two laboratories investigated the susceptibility of 106 Aeromonas salmonicida strains (from Denmark, France, Ireland, Norway and Scotland) to erythromycin, gentamicin, oxytetracycline and oxolinic acid using the disc diffusion protocols (M42-A) published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. In studies of susceptibility to florfenicol an additional 15 Canadian strains were included. Comparison of the data generated by the two laboratories demonstrated that for each disc both detected a similar pattern of distribution but that there was a significant numerical difference in the zone sizes they recorded. Analysis of the extent of this lateral shift between the data generated in two laboratories indicated that the application of a single laboratory-independent epidemiological cut-off value for each disc could result in disagreement between the laboratories as to whether a strain should be classified as wild-type or non wild-type. Normalised resistance interpretation was employed to generate epidemiological cut-off values from the data obtained by each laboratory. The use of these laboratory-specific cut-off values resulted in both laboratories achieving complete agreement as to the classification of all strains to all agents.
    • Impacts of climate change on harmful algal blooms

      Bresnan, E.; Davidson, K.; Edwards, M.; Fernand, L.; Gowen, R.; Hall, A.; Kennington, K.; McKinney, A.; Milligan, S.; Raine, R.; Silke, J. (Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership, 2013)
      High biomass Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) such as Karenia mikimotoi and shellfish toxin producing HAB species continue to be observed in UK and Republic of Ireland waters. Regional differences continue to be seen in the distribution of HABs in UK and RoI waters with impacts mainly observed in the south and west coast of Ireland and regions in the UK with a strong Atlantic influence, e.g. Regions 1, 3, 4, 6 and 7. There is little monitoring aside from the continuous plankton recorder (CPR) in Region 8. The impacts from HABs in Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man are generally low. Since the last MCCIP report card was issued, blooms of Karenia mikimotoi have caused problems in Ayrshire, Scotland, and also in the north-west coast of Ireland where concerns about the quantity of dead wild fish washing on shore during an event in Ireland in 2012 resulted in two beaches being closed to the public. No clear trend that can be attributed to climate change can be observed in the incidence of shellfish toxin producing HABs since the last report card was issued. During the last two years the incidence of some shellfish toxins has continued to decrease (e.g. paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in Scotland). High concentrations of yessotoxins (YTX) and azaspiracids (AZAs) have been recorded for the first time in Scotland. Northern Ireland enforced its first shellfish harvesting closure for high concentrations of domoic acid (the toxin responsible for amnesic shellfish poisoning, ASP) in 2012. A recent survey in Scottish waters (Regions 1, 6 and 7) has revealed the presence of domoic acid in the urine and faeces of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina). The impacts of these toxins on the health of marine mammals are unknown and a more detailed study is currently being undertaken. Many of the future impacts of climate change are unknown. Increasing sea surface temperatures as a result of climate change may increase the potential for blooms of species that are not currently found in UK and RoI waters through range expansion or human mediated introduction. There is evidence that no new HAB species have become established during the last two years. An increase in the duration of stratification of the water column may influence the abundance of HABs in UK and RoI waters. This is particularly relevant in shelf areas and Region 8, an area where offshore high biomass K. mikimotoi blooms have been hypothesized to initiate and impact coastal areas along the west of Ireland and Regions 6, 7 and 1. Conversely, an increase in wind speed and duration may reduce the duration of stratification in the water column. This may result in a decrease of some HAB dinoflagellate species and an increase in HAB diatom species. Little is known about the impacts of ocean acidification or changes in offshore circulation on the incidence of HABs. The role of offshore blooms in seeding coastal blooms (e.g. of K. mikimotoi) remains unknown and the lack of monitoring in Region 8 and on the shelf edge compounds this knowledge gap.
    • The implications of Alexandrium tamarense resting cysts in an area of shellfish aquaculture in Ireland

      Silke, J.; McMahon, T. (1998)
      The Irish Marine Institute's Fisheries Research Centre carry out a monitoring programme for the detection of algal toxins in shellfish. This programme is carried out under EU Directive 91/492. During the course of this programme the North Channel area of Cork Harbour has been the only location in Ireland where toxins causing Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) have been detected in shellfish above the regulatory limit. For short periods during each of the summers of 1996,1997 and 1998, PSP toxins were found in mussels{Mytilus edulis) from this area above the regulatory limit period necessitating a ban on harvesting. Oysters {Crassostrea gigas) from the same area remained below the regulatory threshold. The dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, a known vector of PSP toxins, was observed in the area during each of the toxic events. The exact origin of the populations of A. tamarense was unknown. A. tamarense is known to produce a cyst stage as part of its life cycle. These cysts can remain viable in the sediments for several years. A survey of the distribution of cysts of A. tamarense in the surface sediments in Cork Harbour was carried out in order to determine if they were potentially seeding the area. They were detected in 6 sites, and successfully germinated to yield vegetative cells. The results of the survey are presented and discussed.
    • In vitro and in vivo tumor promoting potency of technical toxaphene, UV-irradiated toxaphene, and biotransformed toxaphene

      Besselink, H.T.; Nixon, E.; McHugh, B.; Klungsøyr, J.; Brouwer, A. (2000)
      Toxaphene, a complex mixture of polychlorinated camphenes, was first introduced in 1945 by Hercules Co. as Hercules 3965. Until the mid 1980s, it was mass produced and widely used as an insecticide, and was also used as a piscicide to control rough fish in various water systems. The lipophilic, persistent, and volatile nature of toxaphene has contributed to its global dispersion throughout the fresh water and marine environment. In addition to bioaccumulation in biota inhabiting these regions, it is also been detected in humans. Human exposure mainly occurs through the consumption of toxaphene contaminated fish. Information on the carcinogenicity and general toxicology of weathered and biotransformed TT would be of major interest. To mimic the weathered toxaphene found in fish, we developed a so-called 'realistic exposure' procedure for toxaphene. This procedure makes use of cod that were exposed to TT. Toxaphene residues that were extracted from cod liver (CLE), were then used in in vitro and in vivo studies to obtain information on its tumor promoting potency. Besides CLE, we also studied the tumor promoting properties of UV-irradiated toxaphene (UVT) and TT.
    • An integrated approach to the toxicity assessment of Irish marine sediments. Application of porewater Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) to Irish marine sediments.

      Macken, A; Giltrap, M; Foley, B; McGovern, E; McHugh, B; Davoren, M (Elsevier, 2009)
      An integrated approach to the ecotoxicological assessment of Irish marine sediments was carried out between 2004 and 2007. Phase I Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) of sediment porewaters from two sites on the east coast of Ireland were conducted. Initial Tier I screening of three Irish sites identified the need for TIE after significant toxicity was observed with Tisbe battagliai and the Microtox® assay at two of the assayed sites (Alexandra Basin and Dunmore East). Porewaters classified as toxic were characterised using four manipulations, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelation, sodium thiosulphate addition, C18 Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) and Cation Exchange (CE) SPE. Prior to initial testing, and TIE manipulations, all porewater samples were frozen at -20 ºC for several months until required. After initial Tier I testing Alexandra Basin porewater was classified as highly toxic by both assays while Dunmore East porewater only warranted a TIE with T. battagliai. Results of TIE manipulations for Alexandra Basin porewater and the Microtox® Basic test were inconclusive. The toxicity of the porewater in this assay was significantly reduced after freezing. Three experimental episodes were conducted with one month between each for the Alexandra Basin porewater. After each month of freezing the baseline toxicity was further reduced in the Microtox® assay, therefore it was not possible to draw accurate conclusions on the nature of the active contaminants in the sample. However, toxicity to T. battalgiai did not change after storage of the porewater. The C18 and CE SPE decreased the toxicity of Alexandra Basin porewater to the copepod indicating that both organic and cationic compounds (e.g. metals) were active in the sample. Dunmore East porewater was assayed with T. battalgiai and again a combination of organic and inorganic compounds were found to be partly responsible for the observed toxicity (C18, CE SPE and EDTA reduced toxicity). Results from these TIEs provide insight into the complexity of interpreting marine TIE data from porewater studies where mixtures of unknown substances are present.
    • Irish Multidisciplinary Deepwater Survey 2007 SSTI Project Report

      Dransfeld, L; Davie, S; Johnston, G; Leahy, Y; O'Beirn, F.X.; O'Hea, B; O'Shea, C; Wall, D; White, M; Gerritsen, H.D. (Marine Institute, 2007)
      The Marine Institute with the collaboration of the National University of Galway conducted a multidisciplinary deepwater survey along the continental slope of the Northeast Atlantic. At three selected sites northwest of Ireland and on the northern slopes of the Porcupine Bank, fishing transects were carried out at four depth strata (500m, 1000m 1500m and 1800m) during the day, while oceanographic measurements and plankton and benthic invertebrate sampling was carried out during the night. Data from CTD and ADCP measurements showed following distribution of water masses: The top 700 m was occupied by that of Eastern North Atlantic Water (ENAW) origin which is a basic feature of the upper layer hydrography in the Rockall Trough; small salinity maxima indicated the region associated with the core of the shelf edge current (SEC). At Area 6, immediately north of Porcupine Bank, a salinity maximum at a depth of 900-1000 m indicated the presence of Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) with the presence Labrador Sea Water (LSW) at 1800-2000 m. The SEC was identified in both CTD and ADCP transects and was characterised by a number of relatively narrow filaments evident in the salinity data. In terms of benthic invertebrate data, a total of 104 taxa were identified with a maximum number of 33 invertebrate taxa identified per haul (these values were recorded at two 1500m hauls in 2006 and 2007, in Areas 5 and 2, respectively). Overall, no clear relationship between the number of invertebrate species and depth was apparent, however there was some indication that the number of species appears to be more variable in deeper waters. Several species occurred in very large numbers; these were the echinoderms, Cidaris cidaris, Benthegone rosea and Stichopus tremulus and the bivalve, Pseudammusium septemradii. Fisheries data revealed distinct deepwater fish communities that changed with depth and to a lesser extent with area. The number of species increased with depth at all sites to reach a maximum at 1500m before decreasing again at 1800m. At 500m depth the fish community was mainly composed of rabbit fish and rattails with some shelf species present such as hake, ling and silver pout. The 1000m depth strata presented a transition of species composition. The most abundant species overall was Roundnose grenadier which had is highest abundance at 1500m in all three areas but could also be found in the 1000 and 18000m depth strata. Other species of high abundance which also had their highest number of individuals at 1500m were Baird’s smoothhead and other species of grenadiers. Cluster analysis revealed that Roundnose grenadier was a distinct species grouping as was that of Baird’s smoothhead. Species occurrences were similar in all three areas with some regional differences; in area 2, Phycis blennoides, greater forkbeard,occurred among the ten most abundant species while in area 5, species, such as Black Scabbard, Aphanopus carbo, and cut throat eel, Synaphobranchus kaupi, were being caught here in larger numbers while present in the other areas in low numbers. Seven comparative tows were carried out with the Scottish research vessels RV Scotia and indicated that overall similar numbers of species and total number of fish were caught. Size distribution also compared well between the two different vessels, however for some species the numbers or size ranges of fish caught differed.
    • Irish National Phytoplankton Monitoring (Sites 41–45)

      Silke, J.; Cusack, C. (ICES, 2012)
      The Marine Institute in Ireland carries out a national phytoplankton monitoring programme which extends back to the late 1980s. This includes a harmful algal blooms (HABs) monitoring service that warns producers and consumers of concentrations of toxic plankton in Irish coastal waters that could contaminate shellfish or cause fish deaths. This programme is primarily located along the Atlantic seaboard and Celtic Sea. Scientists working on this monitoring programme have developed an understanding of phytoplankton populations and dynamics around the Irish coastline, especially in relation to those that cause shellfish toxicity. Particular emphasis is put on the detection and enumeration of harmful species. The importance of phytoplankton as an indicator of water quality is also studied and is a key component of the European Water Framework.