• Observations on a bloom of Flagellate "X" in the West of Ireland

      Dunne, T. (ICES, 1984)
      In July 1983 major mortalities of farmed trout and salmon were associated with a bloom of an unidentified organism hitherto unrecorded in Ireland. Three further blooms occurred in 1984, two of which were associated with mortalities. The morphology of this organism (Flagellate "X") as observed in 1983 is described.
    • Report on the incidence and implications of phytoplankton blooms on the East Coast and particularly Wexford Harbour, Summer 1984

      Doyle, J.; Dunne, T. (1984)
      The Fisheries Research Centre had a number of reports of discoloured water between Brittas Bay Co. Wicklow and Wexford Harbour and south to Kilmore Quay. Samples of water received from Dr. David Jeffrey, Department of Botany TCD, collected from Penny-come-quick beach, co. Wicklow on June 17th and examined by Tom Dunne in the Laboratory contained dense colonies of Phaeocystis pouchetii - a microscopic algae. Subsequent samples collected by Miss Ann Kiley, Wexford County Council, traced the extent of the bloom as far south as Neamstown near Kilmore Quay. A sample taken at Cullenstown west of Kilmore Quay was clear. Also associated with this bloom were large numbers of needlelike diatoms (Nitzschia spp. More seriously, blooms of another microscopic alga (Prorocentrum minimum) began to develop in early July during the later phase of the Phaeocystis bloom.
    • Cork Harbour PSP incident

      Doyle, J.; Dunne, T. (1985)
      Gonyaulax tamarensis is one of the principle organisms involved in Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning in Europe and North America. P.S.P. has not been described in Irish waters with the exception of one incidence in Belfast Lough and also in Kerry in the late 1800s, although this cannot be verified. G. tamarensis has only been recorded in Irish waters as individual organisms and no bloom has been described up to this.
    • Isolation of Yersinia ruckeri type I (Hagerman strain) from goldfish Carassius auratus. (L.)

      McArdle, J.F.; Dooley-Martyn, C. (European Association of Fish Pathologists, 1985)
    • Histological examination of the gills as a method of detecting asymptomatic carriers of A. Salmonicida in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

      McArdle, J.F.; Dooley-Martyn, C.; McKiernan, F. (European Association of Fish Pathologists, 1986)
    • Observed sequential occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in the Dunkellin Estuary, Galway Bay, Ireland

      Byrne, P.; O'Mahony, J.H.T. (ICES, 1993)
      The Dunkellin is a small tidally-dominated estuary to the south-east of Galway Bay in western Ireland. The plankton of the estuary was studied for 18 months between December 1984 and July 1986. This paper presents results on the variation in the sequential occurrenCe of phytoplankton and zooplankton between the inner and outer estuary. Phytoplankton and microzooplankton occurred in high numbers in the spring to autumn months. Highest abundances of phytoplankton and microzooplankton (non-tintinnid ciliates and tintinnid ciliates) were recorded 10 the Inner estuary, whereas mesozooplankton were predominant in the outer reaches.
    • The occurrence of DSP toxicity in Ireland

      Jackson, D.; Silke, J.; Doyle, J.; Nixon, E.; Taaffe, B. (ICES, 1993)
      The geographical and temporal variations in the occurrence of DSP in Ireland are presented and the implications of the resulting closures on aquaculture operations and fisheries are discussed. Prior to 1992 DSP toxicity had been confined to the southwest and south coasts but in 1992 a protracted occurrence of DSP was recorded in Killary Harbour on the west coast.
    • Dinoflagellate cysts in Irish coastal sediments - a preliminary report

      O'Mahony, J.H.; Silke, J. (1993)
      Since the mid 1970's the production of bivalve shellfish in Ireland has increased annually to a present level of some 17,000 tonnes. Several problems limit the continued expansion of the industry, most notably the problem of natural biotoxins. These toxins are accumulated in the product by the ingestion of toxic phytoplankton. This causes no obvious ill effects to the shellfish themselves but upon consumption may be transferred to human or other vertebrate consumers causing illness and sometimes death. In Ireland the most common of the toxins are those associated with Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) which causes diarrhoea. Other more serious toxins which to date have not been confirmed in Ireland are those associated with Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) which causes paralysis or even death and Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP) which causes short term memory loss. Of the phytoplankton species which can result in toxicity, under both bloom and non bloom conditions, the dinoflagellates play an important role. Many of these dinoflagellates have been shown to include a dormant benthic cyst stage in their life cycle. Therefore a better understanding of the dynamics of toxic events may be obtained by studying the distribution and abundance of benthic cysts. There is growing international concern about the transport of harmful aquatic organisms, including cysts, into new areas via the discharge of ships ballast water. Also, as a result of EC directive 91/67/EEC permitting the free movement of shellfish between EU member states there is now increasing concern in Ireland that harmful cysts may be introduced with shipments of imported shellfish. Little research has been carried out on the distribution of dinoflagellate cysts in Irish marine sediments. In this paper preliminary results of a study designed to map the distribution and undertake taxonomic studies on dinoflagellate and other cysts in Ireland are presented and discussed. Also presented are the results of the examination of cysts associated with imported shellfish.
    • Dinophysis species in Irish waters 1990 - 1993

      Jackson, D.; Silke, J. (ICES, 1993)
      The distribution and abundance of Dinophysis species as recorded in the national phytoplankton monitoring programme are described. An apparent spread in the occurrence of Dinophysis to the west coast of Ireland is reported. The lack of correlation between the concentrations of Dinophysis in the water and DSP toxicity in shellfish is reported on and discussed.
    • Harmful and nuisance algal blooms in Irish coastal waters 1990 - 1993

      Silke, J.; Jackson, D. (ICES, 1993)
      Algal blooms occur naturally around our coast. These high concentrations of planktonic algae are associated with favourable conditions of light and nutrients, and often occur at stratification/ mixing fronts. Many blooms are completely harmless, and form the diet of shellfish and zooplankton. Some colour the water red or brown. A few species are toxic and can cause fish kills or make shellfish unsafe to eat. The Fisheries Research Centre monitors phytoplankton in order to detect any toxic or potentially harmful blooms. The harmful and nuisance algal events from 1990 to 1993 are described.
    • The oceanography of southwest Ireland: current research activities

      Raine, R.; Whelan, D.; Conway, N.; Joyce, B.; Moloney, M.; Hoey, M.J.; Patching, J.W. (Fisheries Research Centre, 1993)
      The coastal waters of Ireland are rich in physical features affecting both chemistry and biology. Amongst these are the tidal fronts of the Irish Sea (Le Fevre, 1986) and the Irish Shelf Front on the Atlantic coast lying along the 200m iso bath (Huang et al., 1991). Recently, an upwelling system has been described in the vicinity of the Fastnet Rock (Roden, 1986; Raine et al., 1990). Coastal upwelling systems are ecologically very important and are generally extremely productive, as nutrients brought up to the sea surface can stimulate extensive phytoplankton growth. This paper describes further satellite and ship-based investigations which are currently being carried out to examine the mechanisms driving the upwelling system and its effect on local ecology.
    • Prevalence of Perkinsus marinus in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica in relation to tidal placement in a Georgia tidal creek

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Dean, C.C.; Walker, R.L. (Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium of Alabama, 1994)
      This experiment was designed to evaluate the effects tidal zonation and bottom placement of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, have on the prevalence and intensity of the oyster parasite, Perkinsus marinus a suspected causative agent for subtidal oyster mortalities experienced in the coastal waters of Georgia. Twelve growout bags (1 m x 0.5 m; 12.7 mm mesh), each containing 200 oysters, were placed in Jointer Creek, Georgia In March 1992. Bags (3 replicates each) were placed lntertidally and subtidally on the creek bottom and offbottom. Ten oysters per bag were removed monthly for twelve months beginning March 1992, and were inspected for prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus marinus, using the thioglycollate method. Oyster mortality and shell length data were also evaluated. Neither prevalence (p = 0.3505) nor intensity levels (p = 0.2993) of Perkinsus marinus in oysters were significantly different among the treatments. Although there were no significant differences In prevalence or intensity of the pathogen among treatments, the intertidal offbottom treatment had the lowest values most frequently. Perkinsus marinus was present in all replicates every month. Prevalence and intensity of infection followed the typically observed pattern of maximum values in summer and fall and minimum levels in winter. Subtidal bottom oysters experienced higher mortalities (p = 0.0022), but the prevalence and intensity of Perklnsus marinus in oysters were not significantly different between treatments. It appears therefore, that the oyster parasite, Perkinsus marinus is not the discerning factor in the higher mortalities witnessed in oysters placed subtidally on the bottom in the southeastern U.S. coastal waters.
    • Monitoring of Shellfish Growing Areas - 1993

      Nixon, E.; Rowe, A.; Smith, M.; McLoughlin, D.; Silke, J. (Department of the Marine, 1994-08)
      During 1993, water and shellfish from 19 major growing areas were monitored for chemical parameters in accordance with the 1979 Council Directive 79/923/EC. At each site temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and suspended solids measurements were taken and shellfish samples were returned to the laboratory for metal, chlorinated hydrocarbon and algal biotoxin determinations. Generally, water quality in all areas was good and conformed to the guidelines of the Directive. The highest levels of metals recorded were: cadmium in Tralee Bay (0.4 to 0.7µg/g) and Carlingford Lough (0.3 to 0.7µg/g) and lead in Wexford Harbour (0.5µg/g). Mercury in all cases was low with the exception of Cromane during November when levels of 0.3µg/g were detected. Chlorinated hydrocarbons levels were extremely low and indicate the clean nature of Irish shellfish, unpolluted by these synthetic organic compounds. Algal biotoxins were not detected in any samples.
    • Preliminary recruitment studies of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and their potential applications, in coastal Georgia

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Heffernan, P.; Walker, R.L. (Elsevier, 1995)
      Oyster recruitment was monitored in Wassaw Sound, Georgia from April through October, 1991. The study was initiated to determine precise recruitment patterns of oysters over the 7 month spawning season. One of the goals was to determine the most suitable time for the collection of natural spat for maricultural, fisheries and recreational purposes. Three sites of varying hydrographic characteristics were chosen in Wassaw Sound. The sites varied in terms of temperature and salinity regimes and in their exposure to wind and wave action. Within each site, oyster recruitment was estimated at three tidal heights; subtidally, at mean low water and intertidally, approximately 2 h above the mean low water mark. Sampling took place so as to measure net recruitment over biweekly (BW), monthly (M) and seasonal ( S) periods. The results indicated that the recruitment of oysters in this region of coastal Georgia is protracted, lasting 6 months (May through October). The levels of recruitment were very high relative to other regions on the east coast of the USA, with peak recruitment for the entire study area (x = 2800 spat m- 2 for BW and x = 3020 spat m- 2 for M) occurring between July and September. The intensity of recruitment varied significantly among the three sites. The most sheltered site in terms of wave exposure experienced the highest recruitment (x =4380 spat m- 2 BW; x = 6260 spat m -2 M). This site also had higher overall water temperatures as well as greater daily temperature fluctuations. The least sheltered site had the lowest numbers of young oysters (x = 1000 spat m- 2 BW; X. = 686 spat m- 2 M), as well as having the most stable temperature regime. The biweekly samples generally experienced higher recruitment subtidally at the three sites. The monthly samples had higher numbers of oyster spat at the mean low water mark while the seasonal samples showed significantly higher recruitment intertidally (up to x =7353 spat m-2 ). The shift in recruitment patterns over time is partially attributed to increased subtidal predation pressure on the recruits. The collection of natural spat in relation to the natural fishery, potential maricultural activity and the recreational fishery is discussed.
    • Reproductive Failure of Landlocked Atlantic Salmon from New York's Finger Lakes: Investigations into the Etiology and Epidemiology of the “Cayuga Syndrome”

      Fisher, J.P.; Spitsbergen, J.M.; Rodman, G.; symula, j. (American Fisheries Society, 1995)
      We describe a disease syndrome that afflicts larval, landlocked Atlantic salmon Salmo salar from Cayuga Lake, one of central New York's Finger Lakes. Mortality associated with the “Cayuga syndrome” is 98–100%. Death usually occurs between 650 and 850 centigrade degreedays after fertilization, approximately 2–4 weeks before yolk resorption is complete. Although there is minor temporal variation in the onset of the Cayuga syndrome in progeny from individual females, all sac fry eventually succumb. Incubation of embryos and sac fry under constant, ambient, or reduced temperature regimens slightly alters the degree-day timing of syndrome onset, but does not improve survival. Based on mortality rate, manifestation of the Cayuga syndrome has not changed in the past 10 years, even though incubation waters of varying chemistry and temperature have been used. Mortality of the negative control stocks used for these studies never exceeded 10% from hatching to first feeding. Findings from reciprocal crossbreeding experiments indicate the problem is associated with ova only. A noninfectious etiology is indicated by the lack of consistently identifiable fish pathogens from syndrome-afflicted sac fry and by the failure to transmit the condition horizontally. Suspect contaminants were eliminated as potential causative factors. Epidemiological studies on the viability of other Finger Lakes stocks indicate that Atlantic salmon from Keuka and Seneca lakes are also afflicted (100% mortality). yet those from Skaneateles Lake are not. The cause of this syndrome appears to be nutritional.
    • Toxic phytoplankton in Irish waters

      Silke, J.; McMahon, T.; Nolan, A. (1995)
      The subject of harmful and toxic marine algae has recently gained a growing public and scientific interest both in Ireland and abroad because of the occurrence of these toxins in shellfish.
    • Enhancement of subtidal eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, recruitment using mesh bag enclosures

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Walker, R.L.; Heffernan, P.B. (National Shellfisheries Association, 1996)
      Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, in the southeastern United States are found predominantly in the intertidal zone. In this study, mesh bags (3 and 6 mm) were deployed over collecting frames, and the patterns of oyster settlement on these collectors were compared against unmeshed controls at three tidal heights (intertidal, low water, and subtidal) over three sampling regimes (biweekly, monthly, and seasonal) at two sites. Within the biweekly sampling regime, the meshed collectors and controls had similar patterns of settlement at the respective tidal heights. For monthly samplers, mesh treatments maintained higher settlement subtidally whereas controls had highest settlement on the collectors at mean low-water level. Controls had highest recruitment intertidally for seasonal collectors, whereas mesh treatments had higher recruitment lower in the intertidal zone. Conclusions from this experiment were that the use of mesh-covered collectors enhanced subtidal oyster recruitment. Causes of observed increases in subtidal settlement in mesh collectors over unmeshed controls over time could be the result of a combination of factors: predator exclusion, larval entrainment, or reduced desiccation, which seemed to overcome the detrimental effects of increased fouling, resulting in reduced flow and possible hypoxic conditions within the mesh bags. Given the degree of recruitment and the sizes of the recruits attained within the mesh bags, the use of these methods to attain juveniles for commercial purposes would appear to be both feasible and viable, particularly for long periods (up to 6 1110) of deployment.
    • Embryonic and larval development of Spisula solidissima similis (Say, 1822) (Bivalvia: Mactridae)

      Walker, R.L.; O'Beirn, F.X. (California Malacozoological Society, 1996)
      Larvae of the southern surf clam, Spisula solidissima similis (Say, 1822), were reared in the laboratory at a salinity of 25 ppt and a temperature of 20-22°C through the embryonic and early larval development period. Unfertilized eggs averaged 58.5 ± 0.32 (SE) μm, with the size-frequency of eggs being normal. First polar body was observed 22 minutes after fertilization with 50% of eggs exhibiting polar bodies after 26 minutes. Ciliated blastula and trochophore stages occurred at 6 hours and 16.8 hours, respectively. Straight-hinge veligers appeared 39.2 hours after fertilization. Larvae grew to a mean size of 172 μmin the pediveliger phase (range 119 to 212 μm). Larvae were exhibiting active foot-probing by day 8 and continued to do so until day 13 when the cultures suffered heavy mortalities. Early life-history traits of Spisula solidissima similis larvae are compared to those for Spisula solidissima solidissima and Spisula sachalinensis.