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dc.contributor.authorBodey, T.W.
dc.contributor.authorJessopp, M.J.
dc.contributor.authorVotier, S.C.
dc.contributor.authorGerritsen, H.D.
dc.contributor.authorCleasby, I.R.
dc.contributor.authorHamer, K.C.
dc.contributor.authorPatrick, S.C.
dc.contributor.authorWakefield, E.D.
dc.contributor.authorBearhop, S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-13T11:13:17Z
dc.date.available2016-09-13T11:13:17Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationBodey, T. W., Jessopp, M. J., Votier, S. C., Gerritsen, H. D., Cleasby, I. R., Hamer, K. C., ... & Bearhop, S. (2014). Seabird movement reveals the ecological footprint of fishing vessels. Current Biology, 24(11), R514-R515.en_GB
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.041
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10793/1160
dc.descriptionPeer-reviewed. This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Current Biology. To access the final edited and published work see doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.04.041en_GB
dc.description.abstractExploitation of the seas is currently unsustainable, with increasing demand for marine resources placing intense pressure on the Earth’s largest ecosystem [1]. The scale of anthropogenic effects varies from local to entire ocean basins 1, 2 and 3. For example, discards of commercial capture fisheries can have both positive and negative impacts on scavengers at the population and community-level 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, although this is driven by individual foraging behaviour 3 and 7. Currently, we have little understanding of the scale at which individual animals initiate such behaviours. We use the known interaction between fisheries and a wide-ranging seabird, the Northern gannet Morus bassanus [3], to investigate how fishing vessels affect individual birds’ behaviours in near real-time. We document the footprint of fishing vessels’ (≥15 m length) influence on foraging decisions (≤11 km), and a potential underlying behavioural mechanism, by revealing how birds respond differently to vessels depending on gear type and activity. Such influences have important implications for fisheries, including the proposed discard ban [8]), and wider marine management.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherCell Pressen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries24;11
dc.subjectSeabirdsen_GB
dc.subjectdiscardsen_GB
dc.subjectfishing vesselsen_GB
dc.titleSeabird movement reveals the ecological footprint of fishing vesselsen_GB
dc.typeArticleen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T06:08:12Z


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