• Movement of salmon from the south coast of Ireland in 1973-1974

      McCarthy, D T (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1975)
      In 1973 tagging investigations were started into the origin of the salmon stocks being exploited in the West Cork area (8º0'W to 10º10'W) along the south coast of Ireland. The vessels used varied from six metre open boats to twenty metre trawlers, the average length was 10.5 metres (1972 survey involving 276 boats). Fishing is carried on over the twenty four hours. Up to 1973 nets were 30 mashes deep: in that year nets of 60 and up to 98 meshes were introduced, and during the 1974 season most boats fished nets of 68 meshes deep. The length of net varied from 400 metres to 1.6 km. Nets were shot at right angles to the coast in roughly a north-south direction, all vessels staying quite close to land, the furthest distance out being approximately 2 km from land. Most fish were caught in the bottom portion of the net during the hours of day-light but at night or in rough weather about half the catch were caught in the top portion of the net.
    • Moving beyond the MSY concept to reflect multidimensional fisheries management objectives

      Rindorf, Anna; Mumford, John; Baranowski, Paul; Clausen, Lotte Worsøe; García, Dorleta; Hintzen, Niels T.; Kempf, Alexander; Leach, Adrian; Levontin, Polina; Mace, Pamela; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2017)
      Maximising the long term average catch of single stock fisheries as prescribed by the globally-legislated MSY objective is unlikely to ensure ecosystem, economic, social and governance sustainability unless an effort is made to explicitly include these considerations. We investigated how objectives to be maximised can be combined with sustainability constraints aiming specifically at one or more of these four sustainability pillars. The study was conducted as a three-year interactive process involving 290 participating science, industry, NGO and management representatives from six different European regions. Economic considerations and inclusive governance were generally preferred as the key objectives to be maximised in complex fisheries, recognising that ecosystem, social and governance constraints are also key aspects of sustainability in all regions. Relative preferences differed between regions and cases but were similar across a series of workshops, different levels of information provided and the form of elicitation methods used as long as major shifts in context or stakeholder composition did not occur. Maximising inclusiveness in governance, particularly the inclusiveness of affected stakeholders, was highly preferred by participants across the project. This suggests that advice incorporating flexibility in the interpretation of objectives to leave room for meaningful inclusiveness in decision-making processes is likely to be a prerequisite for stakeholder buy-in to management decisions.
    • Mulroy Bay Scallop Research 1980

      Griffith, David de G (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1981)
      Following a preliminary investigation in 1977, the Department of Fisheries & Forestry carried out an intensive multi-disciplinary survey of Mulroy Bay in the summer of 1978. The results of this "blitz" survey, when evaluated, formed the basis of more extensive research in the North Water during 1979. This North Water programme was expanded in 1980, as part of the Department's contribution to a co-operative research programme on Mulroy Bay organised in conjunction with the National Board for Science & Technology. This included a hydrographic survey, specially commissioned by the Department, to produce a detailed bathymetric chart of the North Water. This was made available free of charge to interested individuals and groups in the locality. The 1980 research results were presented at a seminar in January 1981 at the Department's Fisheries Research Centre, which was organised in order that the data obtained could be discussed and evaluated by the individuals and agencies involved in the field programme. This Fisheries Leaflet is a summary of the papers read at that seminar, by staff of the Fisheries Research Centre.
    • A multi-proxy palaeolimnological study to reconstruct the evolution of a coastal brackish lake (Lough Furnace, Ireland) during the late Holocene

      Cassina, Filippo; Dalton, Catherine; Dillane, Mary; De Eyto, Elvira; Poole, Russell; Sparber, Karin (Elsevier, 2013)
      This study examines the evolution of Lough Furnace, a coastal brackish lake in the west of Ireland, using high-resolution sensors in the water column and palaeolimnological examination of the sediment archive. Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions suggest that meromixis formed as a result of sea level rise prior to ca. 4000 cal. yr BP. Increased seawater inflow has progressively led to permanent water stratification, which caused the onset of anoxia, making the monimolimnion a harsh environment for biological life. Diatom floristic interpretations suggest a progressive upcore increase in salinity, which is paralleled by a reduction in cladocera remains. Diagenetic processes have not altered the sediment organic matter signature. Organic matter mainly derives from freshwater DOC and appears to be linked to the presence of peat bogs in the catchment as confirmed by the C/N ratio. Upcore variations in the C/N ratio with a ca. 800-year periodicity have been interpreted as the result of alternating dry and wet climatic phases during the late Holocene, which appear synchronous with the NAO and long-term solar cycles. The current hydrology is largely controlled by freshwater inflow, which determines permanent meromictic conditions. Overturns are rare, requiring a specific combination of factors such as exceptionally dry and warm summers followed by cool autumns. According to the climate projections for the next century in Ireland, permanent meromictic conditions will probably continue.
    • A multi-year comparison of Spirolide profiles in planktonic field samples from the North Sea and adjacent waters

      Krock, B.; Tillmann, U.; Alpermann, T.; Salas, R.; Cembella, A.D. (Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft, 2010)
      Alexandrium ostenfeldii isolates from distinct geographical locations showed almost identical profiles, primarily consisting of 20-methyl spirolide G (20-meG). Whereas the Scottish isolate produces only this variant, the Irish isolate additionally yields slight amounts of 13-desmethyl spirolide C (13-desmeC). These profiles were also reflected in the field data, where 20-meG was the most abundant spirolide throughout all samples and years.
    • Music 5th and 6th class: Make sounds of the unknown through improvisation

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson will enable students to listen, imagine and create their own music, inspired by the discovery of the Moytirra hydrothermal vents. The students will select from a wide variety of sound sources such as voice, body percussion, improvised instruments and technology to generate sounds of the deep ocean, to accompany the storyboard/film.
    • Music: 1st and 2nd Class - Listening to Ocean Music (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute., 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan if for the children to be enabled to listen to a short, unfamiliar piece of music or excerpts from a composition.
    • Music: 3rd and 4th Class - Listening and Creating Percussion to Sea Songs (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute., 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan if for the children to be enabled to perform simple musical pieces that show a developing awareness of musical elements. The child should be enabled to describe and discuss his/her work and the work of other children.
    • Music: 5th and 6th Class - Listening and Performing Ceol na Mara – Music of the Sea (Irish and English Version Available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute., 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan if for the children to be enabled to perform: (1) as part of a group, one or both songs sung individually or as partner songs. (2) a rhythmic ostinato (tapping a pattern over and over) to accompany the songs.
    • Music: Junior Infants and Senior Infants Class - Creating an Ocean Soundscape using Body Percussion (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute., 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan if for the children to enabled to play body percussion instruments developing a sense of pulse, duration, tempo, pitch dynamics, structure and texture.
    • A mussel tissue certified reference material for multiple phycotoxins. Part 1: design and preparation

      McCarron, P; Emteborg, H; Nulty, C; Rundberget, T; Loader, J I; Teipel, K; Miles, C O; Quilliam, M A; Hess, P (Springer Berlin / Heidelberg, 2011)
      The development of multi-analyte methods for lipophilic shellfish toxins based on liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry permits rapid screening and analysis of samples for a wide variety of toxins in a single run. To ensure accuracy of results, validated methods and appropriate certified reference materials (CRMs) are required. CRMs are essential for accurate instrument calibration, for assessing the complete analytical method from sample extraction to data analysis, and for verifying trueness. However, CRMs have hitherto only been available for single toxin groups. Production of a CRM containing six major toxin groups was achieved through an international collaboration. Preparation of this material, CRM-FDMT1, drew on information from earlier studies as well as improved methods for handling bulk tissues, production of reference materials, and isolation of toxins. Previous investigations of stabilisation techniques indicated freeze-drying to be a suitable procedure for preparation of shellfish toxin RMs and applicable to a wide range of toxins. CRM-FDMT1 was initially prepared as a bulk wet tissue homogenate with planned concentrations of domoic acid, okadaic acid, dinophysistoxins, azaspiracids, pectenotoxins, yessotoxin and spirolides. The homogenate was then freeze dried, milled and bottled in aliquots suitable for distribution and analysis. The moisture content and particle size distribution were measured, and determined to be appropriate. A preliminary toxin analysis of the final material showed a comprehensive toxin profile.
    • My Explorers Seashore Guide Workbook

      Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2020)
      In Ireland we are surrounded by so many different types of beaches ranging from sandy to shingle shores, as well as mudflats to rocky shore lines. This makes it extremely exciting exploring all of the amazing animals, seaweeds, plants and creatures that live there. This book was created to help you become a seashore explorer. The book can be used on the shore or in the classroom to help gather and document all of the stuff you discover on the shore. As part of becoming a seashore explorer we have also teamed up with the National Biodiversity Data team to help them identify and locate seashore animals and seaweeds around Ireland. The Irish version 'Mo threoir don chladach leabhar oibre' also available here.
    • National activities in the field of Aquaculture: Ireland

      Griffith, David de G (ed) (Marine Institute, 1996-05)
      This document was prepared in May 1995 by a group of invited aquaculture experts drawn from the Irish aquaculture industry, the Fisheries Research Centre, An Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Salmon Research Agency, Veterinary Research Laboratory, the Marine Institute and from University RTD laboratories. It was drafted as a contribution to the 1995 meeting of Directors of Fisheries Research Organisations of the European Union, and as a response to a review by DG XIV entitled "European Aquaculture Research: current position and prospects” (COM(94) 258 final).
    • National Infrastructure Access Programme (NIAP), research and innovation projects 2014.

      Dublin City University; Smartbay (Dublin City University, 2014)
      The SmartBay NIAP fund was made available in 2012 through Dublin City University over a two year period to enable researchers to access the SmartBay Ireland National Test and Demonstration Facility in Galway Bay. Research proposals were invited for funding under a number of activity types that are in line with the objectives of the SmartBay PRTLI Cycle 5 programme. This fund provided small awards (typically €2-25K) to research teams through a national competitive process, which was open to all higher education institutions on the island of Ireland. There were both open and biannual calls. The SmartBay NIAP fund was established to enable researchers in academia and industry to access the SmartBay Ireland national test and demonstration infrastructure. Proposals to access the infrastructure were brief and required information on the researcher(s), a description of the proposed research and its potential impact to the research team arising from the access to SmartBay Ireland.
    • National Infrastructure Access Programme (NIAP), research and innovation projects 2015.

      Dublin City University; Smartbay (Dublin City University, 2015)
      The SmartBay NIAP fund was made available in 2012 through Dublin City University over a two year period to enable researchers to access the SmartBay Ireland National Test and Demonstration Facility in Galway Bay. Research proposals were invited for funding under a number of activity types that are in line with the objectives of the SmartBay PRTLI Cycle 5 programme. This fund provided small awards (typically €2-25K) to research teams through a national competitive process, which was open to all higher education institutions on the island of Ireland. There were both open and biannual calls. The SmartBay NIAP fund was established to enable researchers in academia and industry to access the SmartBay Ireland national test and demonstration infrastructure. Proposals to access the infrastructure were brief and required information on the researcher(s), a description of the proposed research and its potential impact to the research team arising from the access to SmartBay Ireland.
    • The National Surveillance Monitoring Programme for Residues in Farmed Fish

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      All European Member States have a responsibility to monitor the use of veterinary medicines in food producing animals, to ensure that produce from these animals do not contain residues that could be harmful to consumers. It is a requirement to implement surveillance monitoring in accordance with the Residues Directive (Directive 96/23/EC) and to have in place national plans (National Residues Control Plan-NRCP) for the monitoring of certain chemical substances and residues in a range of food producing species and products e.g. cattle, pigs, sheep, farmed finfish. The National Residues Control Plan for Aquaculture in Ireland is specifically for farmed finfish and forms part of the overall National Residue Control Plan.
    • National Survey of Sea lice (L. salmonis Krøyer and C. elongatus Nordmann) on Fish Farms in Ireland – 2006

      O'Donohoe, P.; Kane, F.; Kennedy, S.; Nixon, P.; Power, A.; Naughton, O.; Jackson, D. (Marine Institute, 2007)
      This bulletin reports on the National Sea Lice Monitoring Programme carried out by the Marine Institute in 2006. Results presented in this report are mean ovigerous sea lice levels and mean mobile sea lice levels for Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus elongatus
    • National Survey of Sea lice (L. salmonis Krøyer and C. elongatus Nordmann) on Fish Farms in Ireland – 2007

      O'Donohoe, P.; Kane, F.; Kelly, S.; Nixon, P.; Power, A.; Naughton, O.; Jackson, D. (Marine Institute, 2008)
      This bulletin reports on the National Sea Lice Monitoring Programme carried out by the Marine Institute in 2007. Results presented in this report are mean ovigerous sea lice levels and mean mobile sea lice levels for Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus elongatus
    • National Survey of Sea lice (L. salmonis Krøyer and C. elongatus Nordmann) on Fish Farms in Ireland – 2008

      O'Donohoe, P.; Kane, F.; Kelly, S.; Nixon, P.; Power, A.; Naughton, O.; Tully, D.; Jackson, D. (Marine Institute, 2009)
      This bulletin reports on the National Sea Lice Monitoring Programme carried out by the Marine Institute in 2008. Results presented in this report are mean ovigerous sea lice levels and mean mobile sea lice levels for Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus elongatus
    • National Survey of Sea Lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis Kroyer and Caligus elongatus Nordmann) on Fish Farms in Ireland - 2009

      O'Donohoe, P.; Kane, F.; Kelly, S.; Nixon, P.; Power, A.; McDermott, T.; Drumm, A.; Jackson, D. (Marine Institute, 2010)
      This bulletin reports on the National Sea Lice Monitoring Programme carried out by the Marine Institute in 2009. Results presented in this report are mean ovigerous sea lice levels and mean mobile sea lice levels for Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus elongatus