• Marine Ecotourism: A Marketing Initiative in West Clare

      Hoctor, Z (Marine Institute, 2001)
      Many definitions of ecotourism exist, but there is an emerging consensus that it is a subset of nature-based tourism and of sustainable tourism. Ecotourism is reputed to be the fastest-growing sector of the world tourism industry, with estimates of its rate of growth ranging anywhere between 10% and 30% per annum. It is reputed to attract high spending tourists, and estimates suggest it to be ‘worth’ between $10 and $17.5 billion worldwide (Fennell, 1999). Recognising its global importance, the United Nations General Assembly has declared the year 2002 as the International Year of Ecotourism and Responsible Tourism. The focus of this document is on a particular form of ecotourism known as marine ecotourism, i.e. ecotourism activities that take place in the coastal zone, in the marine environment, or in both. While ecotourism is based on enabling people to experience the natural environment in a manner that is consistent with the principles of sustainable development, marine ecotourism is about attempting to establish and maintain a symbiotic relationship between tourism and the natural marine environment. Marine ecotourism activities may be water-based, land-based, or both. They may be formally organised or undertaken independently. They may form the basis of a specialist holiday or simply be an element of a conventional holiday. Examples of activities that could be marine ecotourism include: watching whales, dolphins, sharks, seals and other marine animals, seabird ornithology, diving and snorkelling, nature-based sightseeing trips by surface boat or submarine, rock-pooling, coastal footpath and beach walking and visiting seashore and sea life centres.
    • Marine fauna of county Wexford, Ireland: The fauna of rocky shores and sandy beaches

      Healy, B.; McGrath, D. (Marine Institute, 1998)
      Information accumulated during 20 years of investigations on the coast of County Wexford is summarised. Topics include shore descriptions, faunal records, transectal surveys on rocky shores and sandy beaches, cryptofaunal studies on rocky shores, and ecology, reproduction and population dynamics of many of the dominant species. Studies were mainly carried out on exposed and sheltered rocky shores in the region of Camsore Point, Forlorn Point and Hook Head, and sandy beaches at Kilmore Quay, Camsore, Came, Rosslare Harbour and Rosslare Point, but some collections were made in a wide range of habitats throughout the county. A total of 484 taxa were recorded. Carnsore is the type locality for four species of oligochaete and two more are yet to be described. The fauna lacks some of the elements of west Irish coasts but is richer than on the mid-eastern coast owing to the presence of southern species. Differences in species abundance and population structure on south and east coasts are described, and possible reasons for the differences are discussed.
    • Marine Foresight Study

      APBmer; MacCabe Durney Barnes (Marine Institute, 2020-09)
      Ireland is experiencing a period of major change in terms of the legal and policy framework for marine decision-making, the political and socio-economic context for marine activities, the influence of technological change on marine activities and resultant societal impacts. Furthermore, increased awareness of the marine environment by the general public, owed to increased education and increased access to resources, as envisaged by the previous Integrated Marine Plan for Ireland, Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth (HOOW), continues to provide increased engagement with marine issues. Ireland is beginning the process of developing a successor to HOOW, and this foresight study seeks to support that process. The study has reviewed existing information, both in relation to past and current trends and potential future changes, in seeking to identify the key drivers of change across social, technological, economic, environmental and political topics. The results of the study are captured in an Evidence Database and summary report.
    • Marine Functional Foods and Functional Ingredients

      Hurst, D. (Marine Institute, 2006)
      This briefing paper gives insights into the issues surrounding marine functional foods and highlights opportunities for researchers in the marine sciences and food sciences areas to engage in collaborative research. It will be used as the basis for further consultation with the research community and firms in the marine and food sectors and to assist in exploring and prioritising research themes.
    • Marine Functional Foods Research Initiative (NutraMara)

      Troy, D. J.; Tiwari, B. K.; Hayes, M.; Ross, P.; Stanton, C.; Johnson, M.; Stengel, D.; O’Doherty, J. V.; FitzGerald, R. J.; McSorley, E.; et al. (Marine Institute, 2017)
      NutraMara – Marine Functional Foods Research Initiative: The goal was to create new research capacity and build the capabilities required to maximise the potential of Ireland’s extensive marine bioresources. By supporting a strong interdisciplinary research team, capable of exploring marine animals and plants as a sustainable source of materials for use as functional ingredients and foods, the vision for NutraMara was to position Ireland to the fore in use of marine bioresources as health beneficial ingredients.
    • Marine Industries Global Market Analysis

      Douglas-Westwood Limited (Marine Institute, 2005)
      This report was commissioned by the Marine Institute and completed in March 2005. Its aims are to act as an input to the strategy development process and specifically to provide the following: • An estimate of the global market for marine activities in 2004 for sub-sectors defined by the Institute. • An estimate of the Irish share of the market. • An assessment of regional market trends and outturns over the period 1999-2004. • An estimate of the global market and growth prospects by sub-sector over the period 2005–2009. • Comments on factors that will impact in the longer term – to 2012.
    • Marine Institute's Monitoring Programme for Contaminants in Fish and Shellfish

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2006)
      The Marine Institute monitors the levels of priority hazardous substances in a range of commercial fish species landed at Irish ports and also in shellfish from selected sites around the Irish coast.
    • Marine Institute's Monitoring Programme for Veterinary Residues & Environmental Contaminants in Farmed Finfish

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2006)
      European Union Directive 96/23 of the 29th April 1996 requires member states to monitor certain substances and residues thereof in live animals and animal products in EU member countries. The Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development co-ordinate the programme in Ireland. This programme involves many food groups such as bovine, pigs, sheep, goats, gorses, poultry, aquaculture, milk, eggs, rabbit, game and honey. The Marine Institute through the Department of Marine and Natural Resources is charged with the responsibility of monitoring farmed finfish in the Republic of Ireland.
    • Marine Mammal Strandings

      Rogan, E; Penrose, R; Gassner, I; Mackey, M J; Clayton, P (Marine Institute, 2001-12)
      Since the 1980s, there has been growing concern about the health of marine mammal populations in coastal waters and in particular with respect to a decline in harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) numbers. A variety of possible causes have been proposed including infectious diseases, changes in food supply, pollution and entanglement in fishing gear. Recent studies linking contaminant data with disease levels in cetaceans suggest that higher contaminant levels are generally found in animals with a higher number of diseases i.e. that chronic exposure to PCBs or trace metals negatively influences the health status of some cetacean species by predisposing individuals to mortality associated with infectious disease (Jepson et al., 1999; Siebert et al., 1999). The reverse may also be true, that high levels of disease may disable the animal to the extent that coping with contaminants is not possible and toxins accumulate. The potentially serious role of infectious disease was demonstrated by the phocine distemper epidemic of 1987, which killed approximately 18,000 common seals (Phoca vitulina) in the North Sea and adjacent waters (Kennedy, 1990) and by the subsequent morbillivirus epidemic in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Mediterranean sea (Domingo et al., 1990). Rejinders (1986) and Brouwer et al. (1989) demonstrated that feeding captive common seals with fish caught in highly polluted waters had deleterious effects on their health and there was speculation that pollution may have been a factor in the severity of these epidemics (Aguilar and Raga, 1990, Aguilar and Borrell, 1994, deSwart et al., 1994). Relatively little work on the health status and contaminant loadings in cetacean and pinniped populations in the Irish Sea has been undertaken to date (e.g., Morris et al., 1989, Law et al., 1995, Berrow et al., 1998a). Given the need for such data from relatively "high-medium" polluted waters (e.g., the Irish Sea) such a data collection programme is highly desirable. For a large number of cetacean and seal species, the only way to assess their health status and contaminant loadings, bar live capture and/or killing them, is through a Strandings Programme. Such programmes involve the recording and recovering of beach cast animals. Strandings programmes allow for some definition of the distribution of different species, but are primarily used to examine health status and to determine population parameters necessary for management decisions. Such programmes are imperative, as they allow top mammalian predators to be monitored and increase our knowledge of a number of biological parameters (for example, age, reproductive status, diet), parasites and contaminant loadings. Cause of death can reflect disease status and in the absence of observer programmes, can indicate fishing associated mortalities (by-catch).
    • Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters - Behaviour, Distribution and Habitat Use- Final Summary Report.

      Berrow, S.D.; O’Brien, J.; O’Connor, I.; McGrath, D.; Wall, D. (Marine Institute, 2013)
      Irish waters are internationally important for cetaceans (whales, dolphins and porpoises), with 24 species recorded to date. These range from the harbour porpoise, the smallest species in European waters, to the blue whale, the largest animal to ever have lived on Earth. All cetaceans and their habitats are protected under Irish and international law. The research termed Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters – behaviour, distribution and habitat use was delivered under six Work Packages. The deliverables under this project will provide data which could be used to address a wide range of issues, and will contribute to developing policy advice on meeting Ireland’s statutory obligations.
    • Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters - Behaviour, Distribution and Habitat Use- WP 2: Developing Acoustic Monitoring Techniques

      O’Brien, J.; Beck, S.; Wall, D.; Pierini, A. (Marine Institute, 2013)
      All cetaceans and their habitats are protected under Irish and international law. The research termed Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters – behaviour, distribution and habitat use was delivered under six Work Packages. Cetacean line transect surveys were conducted under Work Package 1 with the following goals: 1. Providing a baseline cetacean distribution and relative abundance data set for the Irish EEZ; 2. Filling spatial and temporal gaps identified in cetacean survey effort within the EEZ; 3. Preparing an Atlas of cetacean distribution and relative abundance for Irish waters; 4. Assessing the temporal use of marine habitats by cetaceans in Irish waters.
    • Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters - Behaviour, Distribution and Habitat Use- WP1 Monitoring Spatial and Temporal Habitat Use and Abundance of Cetaceans.

      Wall, D. (Marine Institute, 2013)
      All cetaceans and their habitats are protected under Irish and international law. The research termed Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters – behaviour, distribution and habitat use was delivered under six Work Packages. Cetacean line transect surveys were conducted under Work Package 1 with the following goals: 1. Providing a baseline cetacean distribution and relative abundance data set for the Irish EEZ; 2. Filling spatial and temporal gaps identified in cetacean survey effort within the EEZ; 3. Preparing an Atlas of cetacean distribution and relative abundance for Irish waters; 4. Assessing the temporal use of marine habitats by cetaceans in Irish waters.
    • Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters - Behaviour, Distribution and Habitat Use- WP3 Biotelemetry of Marine Megafauna in Irish Waters

      Berrow, S.D.; O’Connor, I. (Marine Institute, 2013)
      Biotelemetry is the transmission of information from biological organisms through the atmosphere by radio waves. It encompasses a wide range of devices that can record environmental variables while attached to an animal, such as depth, salinity and temperature, while permitting the recording and transmitting of the position of an animal, commonly referred to as tracking. A review of biotelemetry, with reference to relevant species in Ireland, is presented. Although a number of marine species have been tagged and tracked in Ireland, these studies were generally of short duration or involved small numbers of individuals. However, these studies have shown that tracking marine megafauna in Ireland can be successful and that there is great potential for biotelemetry.
    • Marine Mammals and Megafauna in Irish Waters - Behaviour, Distribution and Habitat Use- WP4 Research into Ecosystem Links and Habitat Use between Cetaceans and Fisheries in the Celtic Sea

      Healy, H.; Minto, C.; Wall, D.; O'Donnell, D.; O’Connor, I. (Marine Institute, 2013)
      Visual line transect survey data for cetaceans were simultaneously collected during synoptic acoustic sampling surveys of small schooling pelagic fish, i.e. herring (Clupea harengus) and sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in the Celtic Sea, off the south coast of Ireland, from 2004 to 2009. These data were used to investigate the interactions of cetaceans with biological and environmental variables in the survey area. Geographic information systems and generalized linear and generalized additive models were used in this study.
    • Marine Recreation and the Process of Rejuvenation of Small Ports and Harbours

      Martin, A.; Martin, B. S.; Wilkinson, A. (ed) (Marine Institute, 2004)
      The main objectives of this report are: To raise awareness of the opportunities afforded by marine recreational activities to assist in the regeneration/rejuvenation of small ports and harbours (SPHs); To explore the background and issues surrounding the use of marine leisure in securing the rejuvenation of SPHs; and To offer some guidance on the integration of marine recreational activities in the rejuvenation process. The report is aimed primarily at potential local initiators and facilitators operating in coastal areas, particularly in areas where there are opportunities to assist the rejuvenation of SPHs through investment in marine leisure/recreation activities. However, the audience for the report will include: government departments; local authorities; port and harbour authorities; local community groups, tourism and leisure interests; harbour users generally; environmental interests as well as potential developers, and all those who are likely to be in a position to influence the process of integration of marine recreation in the rejuvenation of small ports and harbours.
    • Marine RTDI Measure Interim Report 2000-2002

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2002)
      The Marine RTDI Measure Programme, developed by the Marine Institute for and on behalf of the Department of Communications, Marine & Natural Resources, is fully consistent with government strategy on marine resource development and builds on and develops the strategies outlined in “A Marine Research, Technology, Development and Innovation Strategy for Ireland – A National Team Approach” (Marine Institute 1998). The purpose of this Report is two fold. Firstly, consistent with best practice in RTDI management and NDP procedures and guidelines, an independent analysis of progress (Mid–Term Review) in the implementation of Productive Sector Operational Programme will take place in 2003. This Report is designed to summarise and report on activities, achievements and expenditure during the period 2000–2002 and as such, provides an important contribution to the Mid–Term Review process. Secondly, the preparation of this report provides an opportunity to report on the many achievements and activities supported under the NDP Marine RTDI Measure during the period 2000–2002.
    • Mathematics 5th and 6th class: 2015 updated- Data on the shore

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The children will create simple data sets based on living things on the seashore. They will organise data and represent it using pictograms, single and multiply bar charts. Sixth class students will represent data using simple pie charts, as well as explore and calculate averages of simple data sets.