• Ireland's Ocean Economy and Resources

      O'Connor, J.; O'Leary, J.; Shields, Y. (Marine Institute, 2005)
      Although virtually all of Ireland's trade is by sea, and around 80% of the population live in coastal counties, Ireland's marine resource can more truthfully be described as an under-developed resource, or an under-utilised national asset. It contributes approx. 1% of Ireland's GNP - a much lower proportion than in most other maritime countries. Looking at it another way, Ireland's ocean economy - a well-kept national secret - is a wealth of opportunity, waiting to be discovered. This briefing document sets out to provide a profile of Ireland's ocean economy, and explain why, and how, the country should be seeking to develop its maritime resource in the coming years.
    • Ireland's Ocean Economy, Reference Year: 2010

      Vega, A.; Corless, R.; Hynes, S. (SEMRU, NUI Galway, 2013)
      In 2013, the Socio Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU) began the extensive task of data collection and analysis of Ireland’s ocean economy. Marine socio-economic data are not readily available in Ireland; however, it is essential in determining the value of the ocean economy in order to realise its full potential. This report is part of a series of economic reports and it provides an accurate and realistic monitoring of the ocean economy over time. It presents a complete and comparable sectoral profile, which allows us to observe progress on the targets set out in the Government’s Integrated Marine Plan (IMP) for Ireland - Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth (HOOW) (2012). The reference year of this report is 2010.
    • Ireland’s Ocean Economy: December 2010

      Morrissey, K.; Hynes, S.; Cuddy, M.; O'Donoghue, C. (Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU), National University of Ireland, Galway, 2011)
      This report provides a profile of Ireland’s ocean economy (turnover, employment, direct GVA) as well as providing valuable and quantifiable insights into the role of the ocean economy in regional and rural development, providing county by county data on turnover and employment related to the ocean economy
    • Irish and European Attitudes to Marine Climate Change

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2011)
      This brochure summarises the results of the recent EU-funded CLAMER Survey on public awareness of climate change impacts on marine and coastal environments. In identifying specific Irish concerns, and comparing them with corresponding European views, we can learn a lot about Irish perspectives, awareness and concerns. This in turn can guide the regulatory authorities and research community in communicating more effectively with the public about coping with climate change.
    • The Irish Coral Task Force and Atlantic Coral Ecosystem Study: Report on Two Deep-Water Coral Conservation Stakeholder Workshops Held in Galway in 2000 and 2002

      Grehan, A; Long, R; Deegan, B; Ó Cinneide, M (Marine Institute, 2003)
      Increasing public and media awareness of the unique nature of European deep-water corals has put the focus firmly on the need for sustainable management of European offshore living resources. The well documented destruction of deep-water corals off Norway and potentially along the entire European margin combined with extremely slow coral habitat recovery rates, has created a sense of urgency to move towards implementation of the appropriate management measures to ensure the long-term survival of this spectacular and important habitat. In the process, deep-water coral conservation has become in many ways a paradigm for a shift away from traditional sectoral driven resource management approaches, towards an inclusive integrated ecosystem approach to the management of European offshore resources. The EU Fifth Framework Programme, in an effort to increase the socio-economic impact of its R&D projects strongly encouraged the formation of scientist-stakeholder partnerships and development of a suitable research-product delivery mechanism. The major (€2.1 million) European Union funded research project: the Atlantic Coral Ecosystem Study successfully responded to these new challenges in a number of innovative ways. In particular, the establishment of an ACES project-stakeholder partnership through consultative workshops, provided a means for stakeholders to prioritise the scientific research and created a forum for rapid dissemination of scientific results. Complementary initiatives arising from these meetings, such as the formation of the ad hoc Irish Coral Task Force, provided a mechanism whereby scientific findings could be translated into policy advice for the appropriate national authorities. This report serves as a record of the consultative process undertaken during two stakeholder workshops held in Galway on 23rd June 2000 and 24th June 2002. Section A contains conclusions and summary records of the two meetings. Section B contains a series of papers presented at the workshops to provide detailed information on: cold-water coral research and conservation initiatives; fishing related issues; oil and gas related issues and conservation legislation and legal issues. The 2000 meeting was sponsored by the Atlantic Coral Ecosystem Study, while the 2002 meeting was sponsored by the Marine Institute (Ireland), as part of its support for the Irish Coral Task Force and ACES. Between the first and the second meeting, the need for scientific advice to support the designation of Special Areas of Conservation to protect corals under the EU Habitats Directive became a clear priority. Finally, it is obvious that much work remains to be done to achieve effective protection of deep-water corals and similarly threatened 'hot spots' of marine biodiversity along the European shelf and slope. It is also clear, however, that successful implementation of conservation measures will require on-going dialogue with stakeholders, and their participation in the decision making process.
    • Irish Fish and Fisheries

      Dransfeld, Leonie (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The Irish monitoring programme for Descriptor 3 “Commercial fish and shellfish” and fish biodiversity (D1, D4 and D6) is based on the monitoring required under the obligation of the Data Collection Framework Directive (EC 665/2008; 2010/93/EU) for the implementation of the Common Fisheries Policy and for additional stocks/species of national importance. There are two main sources of data collected as part of Ireland’s monitoring programme; fishery independent and fishery dependent data. The first involves monitoring the temporal and spatial changes in the fish populations using fisheries surveys on research vessels and commercial vessels. Fishery dependant data involves collecting and analysing biological data (age, length etc.) of the fish caught, together with data on the quantities of fish caught and the fishing effort. The fish and fisheries monitoring programme includes the evaluation of the fishing sector using capacity and activity, pressure monitoring of contributing activities in terms of distribution and intensity of effort, landings and discards of fish and shellfish and accidental bycatch of other species. Pressure on habitats is partially monitored based on the spatial and temporal distribution of bottom contacting fishing gear within mapped habitats. The monitoring programme also covers status monitoring through the use of dedicated scientific fish and shellfish surveys which estimate the distribution and relative abundance of different fish and shellfish species and the collection of biological parameters.
    • Irish fisheries-science research partnership trawl survey of the Porcupine Bank Nephrops Grounds July 2010

      Stokes, D.; Lordan, C. (Marine Institute, 2011)
      The Nephrops fishery on the Porcupine Bank takes place on a large area, approximately 7000km2, of complex muddy habitat between depths of 300 to 470m. Irish effort has been increasing and Ireland is now responsible for the majority of the landings. The scientific advice has indicated that the stock has declined and fishing mortality should be reduced to the lowest possible level. This Irish Fisheries Science Research Partnership (IFSRP) survey was developed in 2010 to address the pressing need for data from the closed area established by the EC between 1st May to 31st July 2010. 46 hauls were carried out and the results indicate high CPUE for the survey relative to recent observations for the fleet. Strong patterns in size and sex ratio were observed spatially. The male biased sex ratio and size-at-maturity are similar to historical observation. The size distributions of the catches are very different to the Spanish survey in the area which took place two months later. The utility of the survey for monitoring the stock is discussed.
    • Irish Groundfish Survey Cruise Report, Sept. 24th – Dec. 17th, 2014

      Stokes, D.; O'Hea, B.; Moore, S.J.; Dransfeld, L.; Gerritsen, H.D. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The Irish Groundfish Survey forms part of the International Bottom Trawl Survey (IBTS) programme, an international survey effort coordinated by ICES (the International Council of the Exploration of the Sea). Over 42 days in the Autumn/Winter each year the survey collects demersal trawl and ancillary data in Irish waters to produce relative abundance indices for fisheries management. Results from 2014 are presented here and suggest a significant increase in numbers of juvenile haddock and whiting over the recent 5 year period in the northwest. In the Celtic Sea area horse mackerel numbers also show an increase. The other gadoid and pelagic species are within the normal inter-annual fluctuations.
    • The Irish herring fisheries in the twentieth century: their assessment and management

      Molloy, J. (Royal Dublin Society, 1995)
      For many centuries the herring fisheries throughout northern Europe have played a very important part in the economic development of maritime countries. The reason for this is that the herring has been an extremely important source of food for the populations throughout Europe, and the strength and prosperity of many communities depended on the success of the fisheries. The herring fisheries themselves have fluctuated considerably - periods of great abundance of shoals being followed by periods when shoals have been virtually absent from the coasts.
    • Irish Investigation on the Lobster (Homarus vulgaris Edw.)

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1967)
      Commercially the lobster (Homarua vulgaris Edw.) is the most important shellfish in Ireland. The Irish coast is deeply indented, except on the east, and is well suited for the exploitation of lobsters. Even on the east coast amidst a predominantly sandy shoreline, a number of discreet areas are fished actively.
    • Irish Kelt Tagging Experiments

      Went, A. E. J. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries [Fisheries Division], 1969)
      Since the beginning of the century large numbers of salmon kelts have been tagged in Irish waters and the results have been given in a series of papers...a considerable number of kelts have been tagged since 1962 at a number of stations in Ireland and they form the basis of this paper.
    • Irish Marine Projects supported by the EU INTERREG IV Programme 2007-2010

      O'Sullivan, G.; Twomey, S. (Marine Institute, 2010)
      The EU INTERREG-IV Programme (2007-2013) is an important source of external competitive funding for a range of knowledge-based marine projects promoting regional and cross-border co-operation and development. During the period 2007-2010, 29 INTERREG-IV projects (including two preparatory actions) with Irish participation were approved for funding. The total value of these projects is circa €75.5m with over €12.3m in grant-aid going to the Irish partners. This directory provides a summary of each of these 29 projects. Many of these projects in turn contribute to the implementation of research, development and innovation priorities identified in Ireland's national Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (SSTI: 2006-2013) and its marine component, the Sea Change Strategy (2007-2013).
    • Irish Marine Projects supported by the EU INTERREG IV Programme in 2007 - 2008

      O'Sullivan, G; Pedreschi, D; Guilfoyle, C (Marine Institute, 2009)
      The EU INTERREG-IV Programme (2007-2013) is an important source of external competitive funding for a range of knowledge-based marine projects promoting regional and cross-border co-operation and development. During the period 2007-2008, fifteen marine INTERREG-IV projects (including two preparatory actions) with Irish participation were approved for funding. The total value of these projects is circa €35m with over €4m in grant-aid going to the Irish partners. This directory provides a summary of each of these fifteen projects. These projects in turn contribute to the implementation of research, development and innovation priorities identified in the national Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (SSTI: 2006-2013) and its marine component, the Sea Change Strategy (2007-2013).
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 1

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2004)
      The Irish Maritime Transport Economist (IMTE) aims to provide Irish companies involved in International trade with a single journal that provides and collates relevant statistical economic, trade, traffic and shipping market information. The focus of the data herein is on the impact and outlook of Irish maritime trade related performance.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 11

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance.Turning to the performance of the sector in 2013, it is clear that a number of indicators give cause for greater optimism than has been the case in recent years. The volume of trade that moves through Irish ports is a reliable indicator of national economic performance and activity.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 14

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Marine Institute, 2017)
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 15

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2018)
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 16

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2019)
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 2

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2005)
      The Irish Maritime Transport Economist (IMTE) aims to provide Irish companies involved in International trade with a single journal that provides and collates relevant statistical economic, trade, traffic and shipping market information. The focus of the data herein is on the impact and outlook of Irish maritime trade related performance.
    • The Irish Maritime Transport Economist Volume 3

      Irish Maritime Development Office (Irish Maritime Development Office, 2006)
      The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) of the Marine Institute publishes the Irish Maritime Transport Economist each year to provide a descriptive statistical analysis of the Irish ports and shipping services sector, as well as the many factors influencing its performance.