• Crawfish Investigations 1966-68

      Molloy, J P (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1970)
      The fishery for crawfish (Palinurus elephas) in Irish waters has previously been described by Gibson and O'Riordan (1965) and by Gibson (1967). Molloy (1968) has given some details of the scientific work done on this species in recent years. One of the most important aspects of this fishery is that both lobsters and crawfish are exploited simultaneously by boats which use the same type of traps and baits for the two species. Neither the location nor extent of the fishery has shown any marked change since it first became an important aspect of the Irish fishing industry but the annual landings still show considerable variations. These fluctuations in the yearly catch would seem to depend more on the duration of the season and its length, rather than on changes in stock abundance (Gibson 1967). The annual landings (to the nearest thousand fish) since 1951 are shown. The landings in 1968 were surprisingly low for a season which was marked by exceptionally fine weather.
    • The Crayfish Astacus pallipes of an Irish Lake

      Moriarty, C. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries [Fisheries Division], 1971)
      The population of a 30 hectare limestone lake was studied. The crayfish were most active from July to September. Females carrying eggs were present from November to June. Parameters describing the measurements of the stock available for trapping were determined.
    • Creating a newsletter or newspaper.

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2013)
      Creating a class newsletter, students will build their vocabulary and writing skills through drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Students will become familiar with the process of producing formal written documents, such as magazines and newspapers. Through interacting with others in the class, students will also learn how to work within a team.
    • Creating a weekly Harmful Algal Bloom bulletin

      Leadbetter, A.; Silke, J.; Cusack, C. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      This document describes the procedural steps in creating an information product focused on toxic and harmful phytoplankton. The product is an online Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) bulletin for aquaculturists, who can face serious operational challenges in the days after a HAB event. Data from satellite, numerical hydrodynamic models and In-situ ocean observations are organised and presented into visual information products. These products are enhanced through local expert evaluation and their interpretation is summarised in the bulletin. This document aims to provide both process overviews (the “what” of the Best Practice in producing the bulletins) and detail procedures (the “how” of the Best Practice”) so that the bulletins may be replicated in other geographic regions.
    • Creation and functioning of a buffer zone in an upland peat forested catchment

      O'Driscoll, Connie; O'Connor, Mark; Asam, Zaki-ul-Zaman; de Eyto, Elvira; Rodgers, Michael; Xiao, Liwen (Elsevier, 2014)
      Buffer zones can be used to reduce nutrient and suspended sediment export following forest clearfelling by directing runoff over a vegetated area. This study demonstrates the achievability of constructing a buffer zone by initially clearfelling the standing forest, seeding with two native grass species and directing the water from a semi-natural stream draining an upstream 10 ha forested peatland site through it. Following the clearfelling of the upstream study site this study tested the efficacy of this management practice in reducing nutrient and suspended sediment concentration in the receiving water. The buffer zone reduced total reactive phosphorus (TRP) and suspended sediment (SS) loads by 18% and 33%, respectively. Phosphorus (P) retention efficiency was dependent on inlet concentrations, loading and hydraulic loading rates. In storm events with a loading rate of >28 g P ha-1, a flow rate higher than 88.5 L s-1 and an inlet concentration of <17 µg L-1 the buffer zone became a TRP release source. The maximum P concentration in the buffer zone did not exceed 40 µg L-1 during this study demonstrating that the buffer zone method could be used efficiently in peatland forestry to moderate the high P concentrations and assist in protecting salmonids and freshwater pearl mussels.
    • Creative writing: adventurers on the seashore.

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2013)
      By creating and using a list of marine related words in the story, students will demonstrate what they know about Ireland’s marine life and seashore.
    • Critical Role of the Matricellular Protein SPARC in Mediating Erythroid Progenitor Cell Development in Zebrafish

      Ceinos, Rosa M.; Torres, Eva; Chamorro, Ruben; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Ruane, N. M.; Rotllant, Josep (Karger, 2012)
      Sparc (Osteonectin) is a multifunctional matricellular glycoprotein expressed by many differentiated cells. Members of this family mediate cell-matrix interactions rather than acting as structural components of the extracellular matrix and therefore can influence many remodelling events, including haematopoiesis. We have investigated the role of sparc in embryonic haematopoiesis, using a morpholino antisense oligonucleotidebased knockdown approach. Knockdown of sparc function resulted in specific erythroid progenitor cell differentiation defects that were highlighted by changes in gene expression and morphology, which could be rescued by injection of sparc mRNA. Furthermore, a comparison of blood phenotypes of sparc and fgfs knockdowns with similar defects and the sparc rescue of fgf21 blood phenotype places sparc downstream of fgf21 in the genetic network regulating haematopoiesis in zebrafish. These results establish a role for an extracellular matrix protein (Sparc) as an important regulator of embryonic haematopoiesis during early development in zebrafish.
    • Cruise Report Biological Sampling Survey 2005

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2006)
      The survey is intended to address the requirements of the Data Collection Regulation 1639/2001. Information on growth, maturity and sex ratio (biological data) were collected for a range of commercially important species. Ovary samples were collected to validate visual maturity taging.
    • Cruise Report Biological Sampling Survey 2006: Irish Sea 24 February to 5 March

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2007)
      The survey is intended to address the requirements of the Data Collection Regulation 1639/2001. Information on growth, maturity and sex ratio (biological data) were collected for a range of commercially important species. Ovary samples were collected to validate visual maturity staging and to provide fecundity samples for the Irish Sea Egg Production Project in collaboration with CEFAS (Lowesoft) and DARDNI (Belfast). Samples of various squid species were collected for genetic analysis by ANFACO-CECOPESCA (Vigo, Spain).
    • Cruise report: Irish Anglerfish & Megrim Survey 2016

      Gerritsen, H.D.; Kelly, E.; Stokes, D.; Ni Chonchuir, G.; Moore, S.J. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The 2016 Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS) took place from 4-24th January and 25th February to 6th March 2016 on RV Celtic Explorer. The main objective of the survey is to obtain biomass estimates for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa) in and establish an abundance index for megrim (Lepidorhombus whiffiaginis and L. boscii) in VIa (south of 58°N) and VII (west of 8°W). Secondary objectives are to collect data on the distribution and relative abundance of anglerfish, megrim and other commercially exploited species. The survey also collects maturity and other biological information for commercial fish species. The IAMS survey is coordinated with the Scottish Anglerfish and Megrim survey (SIAMISS) and uses the same gear and fishing practices.
    • Cruise report: Irish Anglerfish & Megrim Survey 2017

      Gerritsen, H.D.; Kelly, E.; Stokes, D.; O'Hea, B.; Ni Chonchuir, G. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The 2017 Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS) took place from 14th February to 7th March (area 7bcjk) and 8-17th April 2017 (area 6a) on RV Celtic Explorer. The main objective of the survey is to obtain biomass estimates for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa) and establish an abundance index for megrim (Lepidorhombus whiffiaginis and L. boscii) in areas 6a (south of 58°N) and 7 (west of 8°W). Secondary objectives are to collect data on the distribution and relative abundance of anglerfish, megrim and other commercially exploited species. The survey also collects maturity and other biological information for commercial fish species. The IAMS survey is coordinated with the Scottish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (SIAMISS) and uses the same gear and fishing practices.
    • Cruise report: Irish Anglerfish & Megrim Survey 2018

      Gerritsen, H.D.; Kelly, E.; Moore, S.J.; Stokes, D.; White, J. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The 2018 Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS) took place from 20th February to 19th March (area 7bcjk) and 10-21st April 2018 (area 6a) on RV Celtic Explorer. The main objective of the survey is to obtain biomass estimates for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa) and establish an abundance index for megrim (Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis and L. boscii) in areas 6a (south of 58°N) and 7 (west of 8°W). Secondary objectives are to collect data on the distribution and relative abundance of anglerfish, megrim and other commercially exploited species. The survey also collects maturity and other biological information for commercial fish species. The IAMS survey is coordinated with the Scottish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (SIAMISS) and uses the same gear and fishing practices.
    • Cruise report: Irish Anglerfish & Megrim Survey 2019

      Kelly, E.; Stokes, D.; O'Cuaig, M.; Moore, S.J.; White, J.; Bouch, P.; Gerritsen, H.D. (Marine Institute, 2019)
      The 2019 Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS) took place from 1-25th March (area 7bcjk) and 16-25th April 2019 (area 6a) on RV Celtic Explorer. The main objective of the survey is to obtain biomass and abundance indices for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa) and megrim (Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis and L. boscii) in areas 6a (south of 58°N) and 7 (west of 8°W). Secondary objectives are to collect data on the distribution, relative abundance and biology of other commercially exploited species. This year, additional sampling took place in deep water (up to 1,500m) in order to monitor the recovery of exploited deep-water species following the decline of the deep-water fisheries in Irish waters. The IAMS survey is coordinated with the Scottish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (SIAMISS) and uses the same gear and fishing practices.
    • Cruise Report: Irish Beam trawl Ecosystem Survey 2016

      Gerritsen, H.D. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The first annual Irish Beam trawl Ecosystem (IBES) took place from 6-16th March 2016 on RV Celtic Explorer in the western Celtic sea. The main objective of the survey is to connect the Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS) to the UK beam trawl surveys in the Celtic Sea, English Channel and Irish Sea, with the purpose of providing a swept-area biomass estimate for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa) in area VII. Secondary objectives are to collect data on the distribution and relative abundance of commercially exploited species as well as invertebrates and by-catch species, particularly vulnerable and indicator species. The survey also collects maturity and other biological information for commercial fish species in the western Celtic Sea. The IBES survey is coordinated with the CEFAS Q1 South-west Ecosystem Survey (Q1SWECOS) and uses the same gear and methods.
    • Cruise report: Irish Beam trawl Ecosystem Survey 2017

      Gerritsen, H.D.; Moore, S.J. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The second annual Irish Beam trawl Ecosystem (IBES) took place from 7-16th March 2017 on RV Celtic Explorer in the western Celtic sea. The main objective of the survey is to connect the Irish Anglerfish and Megrim Survey (IAMS) to the UK beam trawl surveys in the Celtic Sea, English Channel and Irish Sea, with the purpose of providing a swept-area biomass estimate for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa) in area VII. Secondary objectives are to collect data on the distribution and relative abundance of commercially exploited species as well as invertebrates and by-catch species, particularly vulnerable and indicator species. The survey also collects maturity and other biological information for commercial fish species in the western Celtic Sea. The IBES survey uses the same gear, methods and stratification as the CEFAS Q1 South-west Ecosystem Survey (Q1SWECOS). The IBES survey is formally coordinated by the ICES Working Group on Beam Trawl Surveys
    • Cruise report: Irish Beam trawl Ecosystem Survey 2018

      Gerritsen, H.D.; Kelly, E.; O'Hea, B.; Ni Chonchuir, G. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The third annual Irish Beam trawl Ecosystem (IBES) took place from 9-19th March 2018 on RV Celtic Explorer in the western Celtic sea. The main objective of IBES is to extend the geographic range of the CEFAS Q1 South-west Ecosystem Survey (Q1SWECOS), with the purpose of providing a swept-area biomass estimate for anglerfish (Lophius piscatorius and L. budegassa) in the Celtic Sea (ICES area VII). Secondary objectives are to collect data on the distribution and relative abundance of commercially exploited species as well as invertebrates and by-catch species, particularly vulnerable and indicator species. The survey also collects maturity and other biological information for commercial fish species in the western Celtic Sea. The IBES survey uses the same gear, methods and stratification as the Q1SWECOS. The IBES survey is formally coordinated by the ICES Working Group on Beam Trawl Surveys
    • Culture of surfclams Spisula solidissima sp., in coastal Georgia: nursery culture

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Walker, R.L.; Hurley, D.H.; Moroney, D.A. (National Shellfisheries Association, 1997)
      Growth of the Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima solidissima, was compared with that of the southern Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima similis. All experimental animals were reared in upweller units at 20°C and fed cultured algae on a daily basis. Over the 14 wk of the study, the Atlantic surf clams grew markedly better (8.9-mm increase in shell length and a 1,103% increase in biomass) than the southern Atlantic surfclams (6.6-mm increase in shell length and 573% mcrease in biomass). Mortality for both groups was negligible. The mean shell lengths attained for the Atlantic surfclams (15.3 mm) and the southern Atlantic surfclams (13 mm) at the conclusion of the study were large enough to ensure good growth and survival on relocation to a field growout environment. The growth patterns obtained under similm growth conditions further highlight some basic life history differences between these subspecies, which were apparent from other studies.
    • The Currane, Co. Kerry, Sea Trout Fishery, 1980-1986

      Fahy, E.; Rudd, R. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries [Fisheries Division], 1988)
      An updated account of the unique Waterville sea trout stock is provided. The latest genetic work is reviewed and the vulnerability of these fish to introgression by other strains of trout is considered. Waterville sea trout are relatively long lived and the consequences of this fact are documented with data supplied by anglers over a period of six years. On average, Waterville sea trout are the largest in Ireland although bag sizes in the fishery are small. Alterations in the stock are monitored over seven years from 1980 using angler caught material. Back-calculations of lengths at various ages are supplied together with information on weight: length relationships. condition factors and sex ratios. The main influence on the age structure of the stock was the recruitment of post-smolt annually. Freshwater productivity could be explained by the influence of length of growing season but regulating factors in the saline environment were not identified. There was some agreement between indicators of recruitment in the Waterville and Burrishoole (Co. Mayo) fisheries. The relationship between B type increment - a crucial element of growth bringing parr to migratory dimensions - and growing season is investigated and various methods of expressing the B increment in quantitative terms are examined.
    • CV19_03 INFOMAR Survey Report, Celtic Sea.

      Sheehan, Kevin; McManus, Oisin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2020-03-02)
      Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. Figure 1 shows the extent of the continental shelf mapped area under INSS and INFOMAR and the outstanding areas as of January 2019. Grey have already been mapped, blue, white and coloured hatched areas are unmapped. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore. Survey areas are defined into gridded survey units known as INFOMAR Survey Units (ISUs). ISUs are all 1000 km2 in size and are uniquely identifiable by a letter on the x axis and number on the y axis. Each ISU is coloured in a shade of blue which indicates the modal water depth in that ISU. Colour scales are used, to denote the three depth bands; 50 to 100m, 100 to 150m and 150m plus.