• Visual Arts: 3rd and 4th Class - Drawing Still Life Scenes of items from the Seashore (Irish and English Version)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to create still life drawings of items from the seashore. The children will be enabled to respond to other artist’s works as well as completing their own drawings by experimenting with the marks, lines, shapes, textures, patterns and tones that can be made with different drawing instruments on a range of surfaces. The children will respond to the pictures created in the class by talking about his/her work, as well as the work of other children.
    • Visual Arts: 3rd to 6th class - Creating and Making a textured Shell Collage Picture

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The students will explore and experiment with the properties and characteristics of materials (shells, sand, stones etc) in making seashore textured collages. They will learn to use their imagination to make a textured seashore picture using shells and sand.
    • Visual Arts: 3rd to 6th class - Seashore flotsam and jetsam treasure hunt and making a Tallest castle or a Mutant Sea monster

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The lesson plans includes a number of activities that can be conducted on the seashore. Variations of lesson can be adapted to suit the children’s abilities and time allocated on the seashore. The children will complete a treasure hunt collecting flotsam and jetsam samples from the seashore to construct a ‘tallest castle’ or a ‘mutant sea monster’ on the seashore. The children will also learn about the benefits of becoming environmentally aware and active in their local community.
    • Visual Arts: 5th and 6th Class - Constructing a Clay Ocean Diorama showing the effects of Marine Pollution (Irish and English Version)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to be enabled to explore and discover the possibilities of clay as a medium for imaginative expression. They will construct a clay ocean diorama showing the effects of marine pollution. The children will respond to the clay dioramas created in the class by talking about his/her work, as well as the work of other children.
    • Visual Arts: 5th and 6th Class - Reviewing Irish Artists and Creating paintings influenced by Our Ocean (Irish and English version)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to study Irish artists who have been influenced by our ocean and produce paintings based on recalled feelings and experiences using the marine theme for inspiration. In their paintings the students will explore colour with a variety of drawing instruments, media and techniques by discover ways of achieving spatial effects e.g. form, shape, position, size and distance. The children will respond to the paintings created in the class by talking about his/her work, as well as the work of other children.
    • Visual Arts: 5th and 6th class- Pressing Seaweed and creating collage artwork

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      Using themes from the children’s seashore experience they will create collage artwork using card, dried seaweeds and other ‘scraps’ of fabric and fibre. The children will explore designing their artwork concentrating on line, shape, form, colour and tone, texture, pattern and rhythm, as well as space associated with seaweeds.
    • Visual Arts: Junior and Senior Infants Class - Creating Underwater Handprints of Marine Animals under the Sea (English and Irish Version)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to compose simple shapes and textures of marine animals in the sea using hand prints. They will be enabled to experiment, repeating and combining hand and thumb prints to create an underwater scene and marine animals. They will respond to the prints created in the class by talking about his/her work, as well as the work of other children
    • Visual Arts: Junior and Senior Infants Class - Designing Explorer Mermaids and Mermen Costumes (Irish and English Version)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to explore the possibilities of fabric and fibre as a medium for imaginative expression by designing a marine costume for a mermaid or a merman. They will respond to the prints created in the class by talking about his/her work, as well as the work of other children.
    • Vulnerability of male spider crab Maja brachydactyla (Brachyura: Majidae) to a pot fishery in south-west Ireland

      Fahy, E; Carroll, J (Cambridge University Press, 2009)
      The Magharees fishery (Brandon and Tralee Bays in south-west Ireland) is 495 sq.km in extent, the majority of this area ≤20 m in depth. Since 1981 it has been occupied by a directed spider crab fishery yielding in some years all of the national catch of Maja brachydactyla. Maximum recorded landings were 336 t in 1999 and effort has numbered up to 10,000 pots annually. Increasing fishing capacity and declining opportunities have accentuated fishing effort on spider crab. This paper describes a catch census undertaken in the fishing season of March to August inclusive, 2000–2007 and a mark–recapture experiment, 2005–2007. A method of ageing the adult moult by attributing a chronology to the rate of erosion of the claw on the dactyl is introduced. Males migrated longer distances, moved into the fishery on a wider trajectory and demonstrated greater wear on the claw than females. Recapture rate of males was twice that of females. The conduct of the fishery changed in its 26 years in existence. Landings became more concentrated in the earlier months of the year and the recent summer fishery was characterized by fewer male captures. Larger males were quickly removed and none >140 mm carapace length survived in the fishery longer than one year.
    • Water Framework Directive: marine ecological tools for reference, intercalibration and classification (METRIC): final report for the ERTDI-funded project: 2005-W-MS-36

      Cusack, C.; O’Beirn, F.X.; King, J.J.; Silke, J.; Keirse, G.; Whyte, B.I.; Leahy, Y.; Noklegaard, T.; McCormack, E.; McDermott, G. (EPA, 2008)
      Water quality monitoring programmes exist in many of the Member States throughout the European Union (EU). With the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD, Council Directive 2000/60/EC) all Member States must harmonise their national monitoring methods for each common metric (parameter indicative of a biological water quality element) used to determine the state of the aquatic environment to ensure consistent and comparable classification results for all biological community quality elements used (WFD Annex V, 1.4.1). The Marine Ecological Tools for Reference, Intercalibrationand Classification (METRIC) project, therefore, was designed specifically to support the Irish role in the EU Intercalibration Exercise of biological quality elements (BQEs) in order to set harmonised ecological quality criteria for the assessment of water quality in the transitional and coastal (TraC) waters of Europe. The BQEs investigated by METRIC included: Plants (phytoplankton, macroalgae andangiosperms), Benthic macroinvertebrates (soft-bottom habitat), Fish (estuarine).
    • Water pollution

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2013)
      Students will learn about what causes water pollution and how to be environmentally aware. *Note: Students should understand the concept of the water cycle before moving onto water pollution (see Lesson Plan “Oceans all Around Us”).
    • Water Quality Investigations in the River Blackwater and River Martin, Co. Cork--1966-1969

      Toner, P. F.; O'Connell, C. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries [Fisheries Division], 1971)
      Investigations in the period 1966 to 1969 showed that the bulk of the waste discharged to the Blackwater and Martin is of an organic nature and arises mainly from industries processing milk, sugar-beet and other foods and to a smaller extent from domestic sewage. Pollution, indicated by increases in the biochemical oxygen demand and suspended solids and depletion in dissolved oxygen, was detected below the towns of Rathmore and Mallow on the main Blackwater, Mitchelstown, on a tributary of the Blackwater, the R. Funcheon, and Rathduff on the R. Martin. Depletion of dissolved oxygen sufficiently large to constitute lethal conditions for fish and other aquatic life was recorded only at Mitchelstown and it appears that the high rates of reaeration operating in most cases prevented more widespread deoxygenation and also reduced the extent of diurnal variation. The concentrations of suspended solids recorded in polluted reaches were well below those which are directly injurious to fish but the accumulation of this material as sludge in slow flowing stretches below outfalls constitutes an extra demand on dissolved oxygen which in combination with the B.O.D. of the water may lead to lethal conditions. In the Funcheon, the presence of this material and of sewage fungus on the substratum invalidates the application of the standard theoretical method for predicting the variation of dissolved oxygen. The partial or complete elimination of the normal flora and invertebrate fauna from riffles below the main waste outfalls, and replacement of these by biocoenoses typical of slow flowing silted reaches were recorded in each area. The extent of such changes seemed to be related more to the intensity of sewage fungus growth on the substratum than directly to the chemical quality of the water. Complete elimination of fish was only recorded at Mitchelstown, the stretch affected being half a mile in length. Trout and coarse fish were present in all af the other polluted stretches investigated though in some of these young salmon were absent and trout very few in number. Trout appeared to make better growth in polluted than in unpolluted water, especially at Rathmore, and this is due in part to a greater food supply in the former reaches. Short surveys of the Blackwater estuary indicated that this reach may be slightly polluted. While the investigations indicated that severe pollution occurred in several reaches of the Blackwater and Martin, it was considered that the overall productivity of fish in the rivers was unlikely, at that stage, to have been adversely affected by such pollution.
    • Water-based Tourism - A Strategic Vision for Galway

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2002)
      Water-based Tourism – A Strategic Vision for Galway is a report commissioned by a consortium of Agencies in collaboration with Ireland West Tourism. The terms of reference were to undertake a study which would: - evaluate the potential to develop the water-based tourism and leisure resource in Galway City and County; - identify the potential and provide a development strategy for at least six pilot water-based tourism and leisure initiatives in selected geographic locations throughout Galway; - recommend further phased development options which would enhance and sustain economic progress of the water-based tourism and leisure sector in Galway. Tourism Development International were contracted to undertake the study, the results of which are presented in this report.
    • Water-based Tourism and Leisure Product Audit 2006

      Huskyes, E; O'Connor, K (Marine Institute, 2006)
      In consultation with key agencies and stakeholders, the Marine Institute is drafting a Development Strategy for the marine/water-based tourism and leisure sector for the period 2007-2013. Preparation and research for this has involved the completion of a Water-based Tourism and Leisure Product Audit. The Institute worked in collaboration with Royal Haskoning, spatial planning consultants, and Kevin O’Connor, Donegal County Council, to complete the audit. The objective of the audit is to systematically assess the quantity and quality of Ireland’s waterbased tourism and leisure products and to identify product gaps and opportunities at local, regional and national level with a view to informing policy and investment decisions.
    • Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic Survey (WESPAS) 06 June - 21 July, 2017

      O’Donnell, C.; O’Malley, M.; Mullins, E.; Lynch, D.; Keogh, N.; O’Sullivan, C. (Marine Institute, 2017)
      The WESPAS survey program is the consolidation of two existing survey programs carried out by FEAS. The Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey has been carried out annually since 2008 and reports on the annual abundance of summer feeding aggregations of herring to the west of Scotland and to the north and west of Ireland from 54°N to 58°30’N. The boarfish survey was carried out from 2011 using a chartered fishing vessel and reports on the abundance of spawning aggregations of boarfish from 47°N to 57°N. In 2016 both surveys were combined and carried out onboard the RV Celtic Explorer over a 42 day period providing synoptic coverage of shelf waters from 47°N northwards to 58°30’N.
    • Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic Survey (WESPAS) 10 June – 24 July, 2018

      O'Donnell, C.; O’Malley, M.; Lynch, D.; Mullins, E.; Keogh, N.; Power, J.; Long, A.; Croot, P. (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The WESPAS survey program is the consolidation of two existing survey programs carried out by FEAS, the Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey and the boarfish acoustic survey. The Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey has been carried out annually since 2008 and reports on the annual abundance of summer feeding aggregations of herring to the west of Scotland and to the north and west of Ireland from 54°N to 58°30’N. The boarfish survey was conducted from 2011 using a chartered fishing vessel and reported the abundance of spawning aggregations of boarfish from 47°N to 57°N. In 2016 both surveys were combined and since then have been carried out onboard the RV Celtic Explorer over a 42 day period providing synoptic coverage of shelf waters from 47°N northwards to 58°30’N. Age stratified relative stock abundance estimates of boarfish, herring and horse mackerel within the survey area were calculated using acoustic data and biological data from trawl sampling. Stock estimates of boarfish and horse mackerel were submitted to the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2018. Herring estimates are submitted to the Herring Assessment Working Group (HAWG) meeting in March every year. Survey performance will be reviewed at the ICES Planning Group meeting for International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) meeting in January 2019.
    • Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic Survey (WESPAS) 13 June - 24 July, 2019

      O’Donnell, C.; O’Malley, M.; Lynch, D.; Mullins, E.; Connaughton, P.; Power, J.; Long, A.; Croot, P. (Marine Institute, 2020)
      The WESPAS survey program is the consolidation of two existing survey programs carried out by FEAS. The Malin Shelf herring acoustic survey has been carried out annually since 2008 and reports on the annual abundance of summer feeding aggregations of herring to the west of Scotland and to the north and west of Ireland from 54°N to 58°30’N. The boarfish survey was carried out from 2011 using a chartered fishing vessel and reports on the abundance of spawning aggregations of boarfish from 47°N to 57°N. In 2016 both surveys were combined and carried out onboard the RV Celtic Explorer over a 42 day period providing synoptic coverage of shelf waters from 47°N northwards to 58°30’N.
    • Western European Shelf Pelagic Acoustic Survey (WESPAS) 16 June - 30 July, 2016

      O'Donnell, C.; Nolan, C.; Johnson, G.; O'Malley, M.; Mullins, E.; Keogh, N.; O'Callaghan, S.; Keogh, H.; Grassie, A.; Nicholas, S. (Marine Instiute, 2016)
      The WESPAS survey program is the consolidation of two existing survey programs carried out by FEAS. The Main Shelf herring acoustic survey has been carried out annually since 2008 and reports on the annual abundance of summer feeding aggregations of herring to the west of Scotland and north of Ireland from 54N to 59N. The boarfish survey has been carried out since 2011using a chartered fishing vessel and reports on the abundance of spawning aggregations of boarfish 47N to 57N. In 2016 both surveys were combined and carried out onboard the RV Celtic Explorer over a 42 day period providing synoptic coverage of shelf waters from 59N southwards to 47N.
    • Western Irish Sea Nephrops (FU15) 2007 UWTV Survey Report

      Lordan, Colm; Doyle, Jennifer; Briggs, Richard (Marine Institute & Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, 2008)
      The UWTV survey has been conducted on the western Irish Sea for a time series of 5 years. This report details the results of the surveys to date. The paper identifies a number of issues critical to the calculation of absolute abundance indices from the surveys and concludes that it is premature to have catch advice based directly on the survey although currently there is no serious concern regarding stock status on the western Irish Sea since burrow counts are still high.
    • Western Irish Sea Nephrops (FU15) 2008 UWTV Survey Report

      Lordan, Colm; Doyle, Jennifer; Briggs, Richard (Marine Institute & Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, 2009-05)
      This survey is carried out in co-operation with Marine Institute (Ireland) and AFBI (Northern Ireland) and is in its sixth year. A revision of the count data for the early years 2003 and 2004 is also presented where the initial high burrow estimates were checked and a drift in burrow identification was detected as detailed in SGNEPS 2009.