• Bivalve aquaculture and exotic species: a review of ecological considerations and management issues

      McKindsey, C.W.; Landry, T.; O'Beirn, F.X.; Davies, I.M. (National Shellfisheries Association, 2007)
      Bivalves have been grown and transported for culture for hundreds of years and the introduction of some species outside of their native range for aquaculture has been suggested to be one of the greatest modes of introduction of exotic marine species. However, there has yet to be a thorough assessment of the importance of aquaculture and bivalve culture in particular, to the introduction and spread of exotic species. This paper reviews some of the environmental and ecological implications of the relationship between bivalve aquaculture and the introduction and spread of exotic species, management implications and mitigation strategies. Two broad classes of introductions of exotic species may result from activities associated with bivalve aquaculture. First, the intentional introduction of exotic species into an area for aquaculture purposes, i.e. the ‘‘target’’ species. These are typically foundation or engineering species and may have a considerable influence on receiving ecosystems. Second, the introduction of species that are either associated with introduced bivalves or facilitated by aquaculture activities (i.e. structures or husbandry practices). These may include both ‘‘hitchhiking’’ species (organisms that grow in association with or may be transferred with cultured bivalves) and disease causing organisms.Management options should include the use of risk assessments prior to transfers and quarantines. Various types of mitigation for exotic species have been evaluated but are generally not very successful. Because the risk of exotic species to ecosystems and the bivalve farming industry itself may be great, effort should be directed to better predict and halt introductions of potentially harmful species.
    • Blue Growth and Horizon 2020, competitive marine/maritime research funding opportunities in the Horizon 2020 programme (2014-2020)

      O’Reilly, E.; O’Sullivan, G. (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The EU Blue Growth Strategy (2012) is the EU’s long term strategy to support sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors. The Blue Growth Strategy recognises that the European seas and oceans are central to the European economy with great potential for innovation, economic growth and job creation. The Blue Growth Strategy is the Integrated Maritime Policy’s contribution to achieving the goals of the Europe 2020 Strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. Implementation of the Blue Growth Strategy, including sea-basin strategies such as the EU Atlantic Action Plan (2014-2020)2, can be supported by EU co-funding programmes such as Structural and Cohesion Funds (e.g. INTERREG, Smart Specialisation, etc.), Horizon 2020, European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF), etc. Horizon 2020 (2014-2020)is the financial instrument implementing the Innovation Union, a Europe 2020 flagship initiative aimed at securing Europe’s global competitiveness. The €80 billion Horizon 2020 Programme (2014-2020) for research and innovation is part of the drive to create new growth and jobs in Europe. Horizon 2020 will tackle societal challenges by helping to bridge the gap between research and the market by, for example, helping innovative enterprise to develop their technological breakthroughs into viable products with real commercial potential. This market-driven approach will include creating partnerships with the private sector and Member States to bring together the resources needed.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report March 26- April 15, 2013

      O’Donnell, C.; Mullins, E.; Johnston, G.; Keogh, N. (Marine Institute, 2013)
      Acoustic surveys targeting blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning and post spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of this migratory stock within the main spawning grounds to the west of Ireland and Britain. Since 2004, an International coordinated survey program has expanded to include vessels from the EU (Ireland and the Netherlands) and the Faroes. Due to the highly migratory nature of the stock a large geographical area has to be surveyed. Spawning takes place from January through to April along the shelf edge from the southern Porcupine Bank area northwards to the aroe/Shetland Ridge including offshore areas as the Rosemary, Hatton and Rockall Banks. Peak spawning occurs between mid-March and mid April and acoustic surveys are timed to occur during this phase. To facilitate a more coordinated spatio-temporal approach to the survey participating countries meet annually to discuss survey methods and define effort allocation at the ICES led Working Group International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS). Data from the annual spawning stock abundance survey (March/April, western waters), juvenile surveys (May, Norwegian Sea and January-March, Barents Sea trawl survey) and commercial landings data are presented annually at the ICES Working Group of Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE). Ultimately, combined data inputs into the management and catch advice for this international cross boundary stock. The 2013 survey was part of an international collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), FV Vilnus (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62° N) to south of Ireland (52° N), with east -west extension from 4°-19° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance and biomass index the blue whiting spawning stock in western waters. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGIPS meeting held in December. The information presented here relates to the Irish survey.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report March 27- April 16, 2009

      O'Donnell, C; Mullins, E; Johnston, G; Saunders, R; Beattie, S; McCann, K; Lyons, K; Brkic, Z; O'Leary, E (Marine Institute, 2009)
      Acoustic surveys on the blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stock in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Norway since the early 1970s. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of this migratory stock within its key spawning grounds. Since 2004, the coordinated survey program has expanded and to include vessels from the EU (Ireland and the Netherlands) and the Faroes. Due to the highly migratory nature of the stock a large geographical area has to be surveyed. Spawning takes place from January through to April along the shelf break and offshore Banks including the Rosemary, Hatton and Rockall Banks. Peak spawning occurs between mid- March and mid April and acoustic surveys are timed to occur during this phase. To facilitate a more coordinated spatio-temporal approach to the survey, participating countries meet annually to discuss survey methods and define target areas at the ICES led Planning Group of Northern Pelagic Ecosystem Surveys (PGNAPES). Data from the annual spawning stock abundance survey (March/April, western waters), juvenile surveys (May, Norwegian Sea and January-March, Barents Sea trawl survey) and commercial landings data are presented annually at the ICES Working Group of Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWDS). Ultimately, combined data inputs into the management and catch advice for this international cross boundary stock. The 2009 survey was part of an International collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes) and the FV Brennholm (Norwegian commercial charter). The total combined area coverage in 2009 extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62°N) to south of Ireland (51.30°N), with east -west extension from 5°-18° W. Combined area coverage included shelf break areas (>250m) and large bathymetric features including the slope areas of the Porcupine, Rockall and Hatton Banks. The Irish component of the survey was made up of transects covering 2,545nmi (nautical miles) covering the slope areas (>250m) of the Hebrides shelf, the eastern fringes of the Rockall Bank, the Rockall Trough and the southern slopes of the Hatton Bank. This survey represents the 6th survey in the Irish time series.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report March 28- April 16, 2011

      O'Donnell, C.; Saunders, R.; Mullins, E.; Johnston, G.; Lyons, K. (Marine Institute, 2011)
      Acoustic surveys on blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning aggregations in the northeast Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of this migratory stock within the main spawning grounds to the west of Ireland and Britain. Since 2004, an International coordinated survey program has expanded to include vessels from the EU (Ireland and the Netherlands) and the Faroes. Due to the highly migratory nature of the stock a large geographical area has to be surveyed. Spawning takes place from January through to April along the shelf break from the southern Porcupine Bank area northwards to the Faroe Shetland Ridge including offshore areas as the Rosemary, Hatton and Rockall Banks. Peak spawning occurs from early March to mid April and acoustic surveys are timed to occur during this phase. To facilitate a more coordinated spatio-temporal approach to the survey participating countries meet annually to discuss survey methods and define target areas at the ICES led Working Group of Northern Pelagic Ecosystem Surveys (WGNAPES). Data from the annual spawning stock abundance survey (March/April, western waters), juvenile surveys (May, Norwegian Sea and January-March, Barents Sea trawl survey) and commercial landings data are presented annually at the ICES Working Group of Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWDS). Ultimately, combined data inputs into the management and catch advice for this international cross boundary stock. The 2011 survey was part of an International collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes) and the RV G.O. Sars (Norway). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (60.30°N) to south of Ireland (52°N), with east -west extension from 6°-17° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance and biomass index the blue whiting spawning stock in western waters. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGNAPES meeting held in August and made available to the WGWDS assessment group.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report March-April 2004

      O’Donnell, Ciaran; Mullins, Eugene; Monstad, Terje; Macualay, Gavin; Power, Gavin; Ullgren, Jenny (Marine Institute, 2004)
      Acoustic surveys on northern blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stocks have been carried out since the early 1970s by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Bergen. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of the stock. The acoustic survey programme is carried out for fishery management purposes, results are presented annually at the ICES led Northern Pelagic and Blue Whiting Fisheries Working Group and from this catch advice is determined for the following year. The highly migratory nature of this stock and its components require a large geographical area to be surveyed during a relatively short spawning window. Acoustic surveys are routinely carried out on specific spawning and pre-spawning aggregations of blue whiting. This can allow for high concentrations of fish to be surveyed in a relatively small geographical and often well defined area, if the timing is synchronised. This survey was conducted as part of a collaborative survey coordinated by the Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway, using the vessel the MRV “Johan Hjort”. Also participating were the MRV “Fridtjof Nansen” (PINRO, Russia) and the MRV “Tridens” (RIVO, Netherlands). The total combined area surveyed in 2004 covered from the Faroe Islands in the north (62º of longitude) to the southern coast of Ireland (50.5º N), area coverage to the west extended from 2º -18º of latitude. The Irish component of the survey was made up of transects covering some 2,080 nautical miles. In addition to the collection of acoustic data fishing hauls were carried out to determine the make up of fish marks recorded by the equipment and to assess the length, weight, age, sex and maturity of the stock. Oceanographic data was collected using a number of spaced hydrograhic stations where salinity and temperature of the water column was recorded at depths of up to 1200 m.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report March-April 2005

      O’Donnell, Ciaran; Mullins, Eugene; Power, Gavin; Goddijn, Lonneke; Mackey, Mick (Marine Institute, 2005)
      Acoustic surveys on northern blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stocks have been carried out since the early 1970s by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Bergen. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of the stock. The acoustic survey programme is carried out for fishery management purposes, results are presented annually at the ICES led Northern Pelagic and Blue Whiting Fisheries Working Group and from this catch advice is determined for the following year. The highly migratory nature of this stock and its components require a large geographical area to be surveyed during a relatively short spawning window. Acoustic surveys are routinely carried out on specific spawning and pre-spawning aggregations of blue whiting. This can allow for high concentrations of fish to be surveyed in a relatively small geographical and often well defined area, if the timing is synchronised. This survey was conducted as part of a collaborative survey coordinated by the Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway, using the vessel the RV “G.O. Sars”. Also participating were the RV “Fridtjof Nansen” (PINRO, Russia), RV “Atlantniro” (Russia), RV “Tridens” (RIVO, Netherlands) and the RV “Magnus Heinason” (Faroes). The total combined area surveyed in 2005 covered from the Faroe Islands in the north (62º of longitude) to the southern coast of Ireland (49º N), area coverage to the west extended from 2º -20º of latitude. The Irish component of the survey was made up of transects covering some 2,228 nautical miles. In addition to the collection of acoustic data fishing hauls were carried out to determine the make up of fish marks recorded by the equipment and to assess the length, weight, age, sex and maturity of the stock. Oceanographic data was collected using a number of spaced hydrograhic stations where salinity and temperature of the water column was recorded at depths of up to 1200 m.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report March-April 2006

      Mullins, Eugene; Johnston, Graham; Power, Gavin; Goddijn, Lonneke; Mackey, Mick (Marine Institute, 2006)
      Acoustic surveys on the blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stock in the north east atlantic have been carried out since the early 1970s by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Norway. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of the combined stock. The acoustic survey programme is carried out for fishery management purposes and is continued to date. Results of this annual spawning stock assessment combined with juvenile surveys and commercial catch at age data are presented annually at the ICES led Northern Pelagic and Blue Whiting Fisheries Working Group. Ultimately, from this combined scientific data, management and catch advice is determined for the following year. The highly migratory nature of the combined stock requires a large geographical area to be surveyed during a protracted spawning period. Consequently Acoustic surveys are routinely carried out on specific spawning and post-spawning aggregations of blue whiting. To facilitate a more coordinated spatio-temporal approach to spawning stock assessment, several nations became involved in the PGNAPES coordinated survey programme in 2004. Ireland is one of these nations involved in this annual survey. The 2006 survey was part of an International collaborative survey coordinated by the Institute of Marine Research, Bergen, Norway, using the vessel the RV “G.O. Sars”. Also participating were the RV “Atlantniro” (Russia), RV “Tridens” (RIVO, Netherlands) the RV “Magnus Heinason” (Faroes) and RV “Celtic Explorer” (Ireland). The total combined area surveyed in 2006 covered from the Faroe Islands in the north (62°of longitude) to the southern coast of Ireland (51° N), area coverage to the west extended from 4°-18° of latitude. The Irish component of the survey was made up of transects covering some 2,632 nautical miles (Figure 1). In addition to the collection of acoustic data, fishing hauls were carried out to determine the make up of fish marks recorded by the equipment and to assess the length, weight, age, sex and maturity of the stock. Oceanographic data was collected using a number of spaced hydrograhic stations where salinity and temperature of the water column was recorded at depths down to 800m.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report Spring 2007

      O'Donnell, C; Mullins, E; Johnston, G; Beattie, S; Ullgren, J; Heino, M; Anthonypillai, V (Marine Institute, 2007)
      Acoustic surveys on the blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stock in the north east Atlantic have been carried out since the early 1970s by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Norway. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of this migratory stock within its key spawning grounds. Since 2004, the coordinated survey program has expanded and now includes vessels from the Netherlands, Faroes and Ireland in addition to those from the Russian Federation and Norway. Due to the highly migratory nature of the stock, a large geographical area has to be surveyed. Spawning takes place from January through to April, with a peak time between mid-March and early April. Consequently acoustic surveys are routinely carried out during the peak spawning period within known geographic confines. To facilitate a more coordinated spatiotemporal approach to this spawning stock survey, participating countries meet annually to discuss survey methods and define target areas at the ICES led Planning Group of Northern Pelagic Ecosystem Surveys (PGNAPES). Data from the annual spawning stock abundance survey (March/April), juvenile surveys (May) and commercial landings data are presented annually at the ICES led Northern Pelagic and Blue Whiting Fisheries Working Group (WGNPBW). Ultimately, combined data inputs into the management and catch advice for this cross boundary stock. The 2007 survey was part of an International collaborative survey using the vessels RV “Celtic Explorer” (Marine Institute, Ireland), RV “Atlantida” (AtlantNIRO, Russian Federation), RV “Tridens” (IMARES, Netherlands) and the RV “Magnus Heinason” (FRS, Faroes) and the FV “Eros” (IMR commercial charter). The total combined area coverage in 2007 extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (61.30°N) to south of Ireland (50.30°N), with east –west extension from 5°-19° W. Combined area coverage included shelf break areas (>200m) and large bathymetric features including the Porcupine, Rockall and Hatton Banks. The Irish component of the survey was made up of transects covering 2,624 nmi (nautical miles) covering the north Porcupine area, the eastern and western fringes of the Rockall Bank and the western slopes of the Hatton Bank. This survey represents the 4th survey in the Irish time series.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report Spring 2008

      O'Donnell, C; Mullins, E; Johnston, G; Lyons, K; Bethke, E; Holst, G; Wall, D (Marine Institute, 2008)
      Acoustic surveys on the blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stock in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Norway since the early 1970s. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of this migratory stock within its key spawning grounds. Since 2004, the coordinated survey program has expanded and to include vessels from the EU (Ireland and the Netherlands) and the Faroes. Due to the highly migratory nature of the stock a large geographical area has to be surveyed. Spawning takes place from January through to April, with a peak time between mid-March and mid-April. Consequently acoustic surveys are routinely carried out during the peak spawning period within known geographic confines. To facilitate a more coordinated spatiotemporal approach to the survey participating countries meet annually to discuss survey methods and define target areas at the ICES led Planning Group of Northern Pelagic Ecosystem Surveys (PGNAPES). Data from the annual spawning stock abundance survey (March/April, western waters), juvenile surveys (May, Norwegian Sea and January-March, Barents Sea trawl survey) and commercial landings data are presented annually at the ICES Working Group of Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWDS). Ultimately, combined data inputs into the management and catch advice for this international cross boundary stock. The 2008 survey was part of an International collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes) and the FV Gardar (Norwegian commercial charter). The total combined area coverage in 2008 extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62°N) to south of Ireland (51.30°N), with east - west extension from 5°-19° W. Combined area coverage included shelf break areas (>250m) and large bathymetric features including the slope areas of the Porcupine, Rockall and Hatton Banks. The Irish component of the survey was made up of transects covering 2,480nmi (nautical miles) covering the slope areas (>250m) of the north Porcupine area, the eastern fringes of the Rockall Bank, the Rockall Trough and the eastern slopes of the Hebrides shelf. This survey represents the 5th survey in the Irish time series.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey cruise report, March 19- April 11, 2017

      O'Donnell, D.; Johnston, G.; Mullins, E.; Keogh, N.; O'Callaghan, S. (Marine Institute, 2017)
      Acoustic surveys on blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. The 2017 survey was part of an international collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Tridens (Netherlands), FV Kings Bay (Norway) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62° N) to south of Ireland (51° N), with east -west extension from 1°-17° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance stock estimate and report. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGIPS meeting held in January. The information presented here relates specifically to the Irish survey.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, March 19- April 7, 2010

      O'Donnell, Ciaran; Mullins, Eugene; Johnston, Graham; Saunders, Ryan; Lyons, Kieran; Beattie, Susan; McCann, Kieran; Jorgen Pihl, Nils (Marine Institute, 2010)
      Acoustic surveys on blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. In the early 1980s a coordinated acoustic survey approach was adopted, with both Russia and Norway participating to estimate the size of this migratory stock within the main spawning grounds to the west of Ireland and Britain. Since 2004, an International coordinated survey program has expanded to include vessels from the EU (Ireland and the Netherlands) and the Faroes. Due to the highly migratory nature of the stock a large geographical area has to be surveyed. Spawning takes place from January through to April along the shelf break from the southern Porcupine Bank area northwards to the Faroe Shetland Ridge including offshore areas as the Rosemary, Hatton and Rockall Banks. Peak spawning occurs between mid-March and mid April and acoustic surveys are timed to occur during this phase. To facilitate a more coordinated spatio-temporal approach to the survey participating countries meet annually to discuss survey methods and define target areas at the ICES led Working Group on Northeast Atlantic Pelagic Ecosystem Surveys (WGNAPES). Data from the annual spawning stock abundance survey (March/April, western waters), juvenile surveys (May, Norwegian Sea and January-March, Barents Sea trawl survey) and commercial landings data are presented annually at the ICES Working Group of Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWDS). Ultimately, combined data inputs into the management and catch advice for this international cross boundary stock. The 2010 survey was part of an International collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes) and the RV G.O. Sars (Norway). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (60.30°N) to south of Ireland (52°N), with east -west extension from 6°-18° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance and biomass index the blue whiting spawning stock in western waters. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGNAPES meeting held in August and made available to the WGWDS assessment group.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey cruise report, March 20- April 06, 2018

      O'Donnell, D.; Johnston, G.; Mullins, E.; Keogh, N.; Power, J. (O'Donnell, D., Johnston, G., Mullins, E., Keogh, N. and Power, J. (2018). Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey cruise report, March 20- April 06, 2018. FSS Survey Series: 2018/01. Marine Institute, 2018)
      Acoustic surveys targeting blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning and post spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. The 2018 survey was part of an international collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Tridens (Netherlands), FV Kings Bay (Norway) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62° N) to south of Ireland (51° N), with east -west extension from 1°-18° W. To the south of 51°N the Spanish research vessel the RV Miguel Oliver conducted a survey, complimentary to, but separate to the IBWSS survey, as part of their annual PELACUS survey program. International survey participants met shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance stock estimate and report. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGIPS meeting held in January. The information presented here relates specifically to the Irish survey unless otherwise stated.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, March 21 - April 11, 2012

      O'Donnell, Ciaran; Mullins, Eugene; Johnston, Graham; Nolan, Cormac; Power, John (Marine Institute, 2012)
      Acoustic surveys on blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. The 2012 survey was part of an international collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes) and the FV Brennholm (Norway). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62° N) to south of Ireland (52° N), with east -west extension from 4°-19° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance and biomass index the blue whiting spawning stock in western waters. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGIPS meeting held in December. The information presented here relates to the Irish survey produced by the ICES led Working Group International Pelagic Surveys.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, March 22 - April 01, 2015

      O'Donnell, C.; Nolan, C.; Johnston, G.; Keogh, N.; van der Knaap, I.; Borawska, A.; O’Donovan, M. (Marine Institute, 2015)
      Acoustic surveys on blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. The 2015 survey was part of an international collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), FV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62° N) to south of Ireland (51° N), with east -west extension from 4°-18° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance stock estimate and report. The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGIPS meeting held in January. The information presented here relates specifically to the Irish survey component.
    • Blue Whiting Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, March 22 - April 11, 2014

      O'Donnell, Ciaran; Mullins, Eugene; Johnston, Graham; Keogh, Niall; Oudejans, Machiel (Marine Institute, 2014)
      Acoustic surveys on blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) spawning aggregations in the north east Atlantic have been carried out by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) Norway since the early 1970s. The 2014 survey was part of an international collaborative survey using the vessels RV Celtic Explorer (Ireland), RV Fridtjof Nansen (Russia), RV Tridens (Netherlands) and the RV Magnus Heinason (Faroes). The total combined area coverage extended from the Faroe Islands in the north (62° N) to south of Ireland (52° N), with east -west extension from 4°-19° W. International survey participants meet shortly after the survey to present data and produce a combined relative abundance stock estimate and report.The combined survey report is presented annually at the WGIPS meeting held in January. The information presented here relates specifically to the Irish survey.
    • Boarfish (Capros aper) target strength modelled from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of its swimbladder

      Fassler, S.; O'Donnell, C.; Jech, J. (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), 2013)
      Boarfish (Capros aper) abundance has increased dramatically in the Northeast Atlantic from the early 1970s after successive years of good recruitment attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature. Due to increased commercial fishing over recent years, an acoustic boarfish survey funded by the Killybegs Fishermen's Organisation was initiated by the Marine Institute to establish a baseline for the future management of this stock. In the absence of any species-specific boarfish target strength (TS), acoustic backscatter was estimated by a Kirchhoff-ray mode model using reconstructed three-dimensional swimbladder shapes which were computed from magnetic resonance imaging scans of whole fish. The model predicted TS as a function of size, fish tilt angle, and operating frequency. Standardized directivity patterns revealed the increasing importance of changes in the inclination of the dorsal swimbladder surface at higher frequencies (120 and 200 kHz) and a less directive response at lower frequencies (18 and 38 kHz). The model predicted a TS-to-total fish length relationship of TS = 20 log10(L) − 66.2. The intercept is ∼1 dB higher than in the general physoclist relationship, potentially reflecting the bulky nature of the boarfish swimbladder with its relatively large circumference.
    • Boarfish Acoustic Survey 09 July – 26 July, 2012

      O'Donnell, Ciaran; Farrell, Edward; Nolan, Cormac; Campbell, Andy (Marine Institute, 2012)
      From the early 1970s the abundance of boarfish (Capros aper) was seen to increase exponentially and distribution ever increasingly spread northwards along the western seaboard and Bay of Biscay (Blanchard and Vandermeirsch, 2005). This survey represents the second exploratory research survey for boarfish undertaken along the western seaboard of Ireland. The commercial fishing vessel the MFV Father McKee, an active participant in the fishery, was equipped with a calibrated scientific echosounder (Simrad EK 60) and transducer within a towed body. Data from this survey, in addition to the extensive biological research carried out on this species forms part of a larger program aimed at increasing the knowledge of this species and its abundance outside of the commercial fishery. Data from this survey will be presented for inclusion into the ICES Planning Group meeting for North Atlantic Pelagic Ecosystem Surveys in December 2012 (WGIPS) and for the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2012.
    • Boarfish Acoustic Survey Cruise Report 10 July – 31 July, 2013

      O’Donnell, C.; Farrell, E.; Nolan, C.; Campbell, A. (Marine Institute, 2013)
      From the early 1970s the abundance of boarfish (Capros aper) was seen to increase exponentially and distribution spread increasingly northwards along the western seaboard and Bay of Biscay (Blanchard and Vandermeirsch, 2005). This survey represents the third dedicated research survey for boarfish in the time series. The commercial fishing vessel MFV Felucca (as in 2011), an active participant in the fishery, was equipped with a calibrated scientific echosounder (Simrad EK 60) and transducer within a towed body. Data from this survey, in addition to the extensive biological research carried out on this species, forms part of a larger program aimed at increasing the knowledge of this species and its abundance outside of the commercial fishery. Data from this survey will be presented for inclusion into the ICES Planning Group meeting for International Pelagic Surveys in January 2014 (WGIPS) and for the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2013.
    • Boarfish Acoustic Survey Cruise Report 10 July – 31 July, 2014

      O'Donnell, Ciaran; Nolan, Cormac (Marine Institute, 2014)
      From the early 1970s the abundance of boarfish (Capros aper) was seen to increase exponentially and distribution spread increasingly northwards along the western seaboard and Bay of Biscay (Blanchard and Vandermeirsch, 2005). This survey represents the fourth dedicated research survey for boarfish in the time series. The commercial fishing vessel MFV Felucca was used for the third time and was equipped with a calibrated scientific echosounder (Simrad EK 60) and transducer within a towed body. Data from this survey will be presented to the ICES assessment Working Group for Widely Distributed Stocks (WGWIDE) meeting in August 2014 and as part of the ICES Planning Group meeting for International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) meeting in January 2015 (WGIPS).