• Report on the incidence and implications of phytoplankton blooms on the East Coast and particularly Wexford Harbour, Summer 1984

      Doyle, J.; Dunne, T. (1984)
      The Fisheries Research Centre had a number of reports of discoloured water between Brittas Bay Co. Wicklow and Wexford Harbour and south to Kilmore Quay. Samples of water received from Dr. David Jeffrey, Department of Botany TCD, collected from Penny-come-quick beach, co. Wicklow on June 17th and examined by Tom Dunne in the Laboratory contained dense colonies of Phaeocystis pouchetii - a microscopic algae. Subsequent samples collected by Miss Ann Kiley, Wexford County Council, traced the extent of the bloom as far south as Neamstown near Kilmore Quay. A sample taken at Cullenstown west of Kilmore Quay was clear. Also associated with this bloom were large numbers of needlelike diatoms (Nitzschia spp. More seriously, blooms of another microscopic alga (Prorocentrum minimum) began to develop in early July during the later phase of the Phaeocystis bloom.
    • Report on the Sea and Inland Fisheries of Ireland for 1901, Part II - Scientific Investigations

      Holt, E. W. L.; Byrne, L. W.; Farran, G.; Crook, T.; Cole Grenville, A. J.; Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland (Dublin, The Stationery Office, 1901)
      I. The Porcupine Bank. * II. The Public Oyster Beds on the Coasts of Counties Wicklow and Wexford, by E. W. L. Holt. * III. The British and Irish Gobies, by E. W. L. Holt and L. W Byrne Plates I. and II., * IV. On a Young Stage of the White Sole, Pleuroneetes (Glyptocephalus) cynoglossus, by E. W. L. Holt and L. W. Byrne, Plate III., * V. The British and Irish Species of the Family Stromateidae by E. W. L. Holt and L. W. Byrne, Plates IV. and V. * VI. A Norwegian Method of Oyster Culture :— (i.) Directions issued by the Society for the Encouragement of Norwegian Fisheries. Translated from “Norsk Fiskeritidende,” No. 1, 1900 (ii.) On Methods of Collecting and Rearing Oyster Fry. By Alf. Wollebaek, Zoologist to the Society for the Encouragement of Norwegian Fisheries. Translated from “ Norsk Fiskeritidende,” No. 5, 1902 (iii.) A Communication upon Oyster Culture, by Alf. Wollebaek, Plates VI.—XV. Translated from “Norsk Fiskeritidende,” No. 9, 1901. * VII. Record of the Copepoda taken on the Mackerel Fishing Grounds off Cleggan, Co. Galway, in 1901, by G. P. Farran, B.A., Plates XVI., XVII. * VIII- The Marine Fauna of the West Coast of Ireland. Part I. The Nudibranchiate .Molluscs of Ballynakill and Bofin Harbours Co. Galway, by G. P. Farran, B.A., Plates XVIII., XIX. * IX. On Rock Specimens dredged from the Floor of the Atlantic off the West Coast of Ireland in 1901, by Grenville A. J. Cole, F.G.S M.R.I.A., and T. Crook, A.R.C.SC.I., Plates XX. - XXII. * Inland Fisheries * X. Statistical Information relating to the Salmon Fisheries. * XI. The Relationship between Size and Sexual Maturity in Pollen, by E. W. L. Holt. * XII. Report on the Artificial Propagation of Salmonidae for the Season 1901-1902, by E. W. L. Holt. * XIII. Record of Salmon Marking in Ireland, 1898-1902, by E. W. L. Holt. * XIV. Drawings and Descriptions of Apparatus used in Salmon and Trout Culture. * XV. Substance of Reports received from Clerks of Boards of Conservators relative to the Salmon Fisheries.
    • Report on the Sea and Inland Fisheries of Ireland for 1902-03. Part II - Scientific Investigations

      Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland; Delap, C.; Farran, G.; Delap, M.; Sykes, E. R.; Hoyle, W. E.; Holt, E. W. L.; Tattersall, W. M.; Calman, W. T.; Byrne, L. W.; et al. (Dublin, The Stationery Office, 1903)
      I. i.—Notes on the Plankton of Valencia Harbour, 1899-1901, by M. and C. Delap. ii.—Notes on the rearing, in an Aquarium, of Cyanea Lamarcki, Peron and Lesueur, by M. J. Delap, Plates I. and II. * II. Report on the Copepoda of the Atlantic Slope off Counties Mayo and Galway, by G. P. Farran, B.A., Plates III. to XIII. * III. The Marine Fauna of the West Coast of Ireland, Part II.- i- The Molluscs and Brachiopods of Ballynakill and Bofin Harbours, Co. Galway, and of the Deep Water off the West and South-West Coasts of Ireland, by E. R. Sykes, B.A., ii.—On Specimens of Tracheloteuthis and Cirroteuthis from Deep Water off the West Coast of Ireland, by W. E. Hoyle, Plate XIV. * IV. i.- Schizopodous Crustacea from the North-East Atlantic Slope, by E. W. L. Holt and W. M. Tattersall, B.Sc., Plates XV. to XXV. ii.—Note on a Genus of Euphausid Crustacea, by W. T. Calman, D. Sc., Plate XXVI. * V. i.—Note on a Specimen of Dentex vulgaris from Dingle Bay, by E. W. L. Holt and L. W. Byrne, Plate XXVII. ii.—The British and Irish Gobies, Supplement, by E. W. L. Holt and L. W. Byrne, Plate XXVIII. iii.—Figures and Descriptions of the British and Irish Species of Solea, by E. W. L. Holt and L. W. Byrne, Plates XXIX. to XXXIV. * VI. The Marine Fauna of the West Coast of Ireland, Part III. :—Echinoderms of Ballynakill and Bofin Harbours, Co. Galway, and of the Deep Water off the West Coast of Ireland, by S. W. Kemp, B.A., Plate XXXV. * VII. The Marine Fauna of the West Coast of Ireland, Miscellaneous Notes; — i.—Additions to the List of Nudibranchiate Molluscs of Ballynakill Harbour, Co. Galway, by G. P. Farran, B.A., ii.—Rediscovery of the Nudibranch Alderia modesta (Loven), by G. P. Farran. B.A., iii.—Occurrence of the Floating Barnacle, Lepas fascicularis (Ellis and Sol.), by G. P. Farran, B.A., iv.—On Nebulia typhlops. G. O. Sars bv W. M. Tattersall, B.Sc., v.—On Stomatopod larvae from the West Coast of Ireland, by W. M. Tattersall, B.Sc. vi.—Enteropneusta from the West Coast of Ireland, by W. M. Tattersall, B.Sc. * VIII. Preliminary Report on Experiments in Oyster Culture on the West Coast of Ireland, by E. W. L. Holt and A. B. E. Hillas, B.A., * IX. Quarterly observations of Temperature, S.S. “ Helga,” * X. Note on the Manurial Value of the Seaweed Cladophora rupestids, by E. W. L. Holt. * Inland Fisheries * XI. i. - Report on the Artificial Propagation of Salmonidae for the Seasons of 1902-1903 and 1903-1904, by E. W. L. Holt, ii.—Preliminary Note on the Size of Salmon Eggs, in relation to estimating their Number, by C. Green, B.A.,. iii.—Report on the Salmon Hatchery at Lismore, by Charles Deane Oliver, B.A.I., M.I.C.E., . * XII. Statistical Information relating to the Salmon Fisheries. * XIII. Substance of Reports received from Clerks of Conservators relative to Salmon Fisheries.
    • Report on the Sea and Inland Fisheries of Ireland for 1904. Part II - Scientific Investigations

      Tatterstall, W. M.; Pearsou, J.; Carpenter, G. H.; Holt, E. W. L.; Gough, L. H.; Arens, C.; Hillus, A. B. E.; Calman, W. T.; Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland (Dublin, The Stationery Office, 1904)
      I. The Marine Fauna of the West Coast of Ireland, Part IV. Cumacea, by W T. Calman, D.Sc., Plates I to V. * II. The Marine Fauna of the Coast of Ireland, Part V. Isopoda, by W. M. Tattersail, B.Sc., Plates I to XI. * III. A list of the Marine Copepoda of Ireland, Part I, Littoral Forms and Fish Parasites, by Joseph Pearsou, B. Sc. * IV. The Marine Fauna of the Coast of Ireland, Part VI. Pyenogonida, by Prof. George H. Carpenter, B.Sc., M.R.I.A., Plates I to III. * V. Schizopodous Crustacea from the North-East Atlantic Slope. Supplement, by E. W. L. Holt and W. M. Tattersall, B.Sc., Plates I to V. * VI. i.— Plankton collected at Irish Light Stations in 1904, by Lewis Henry Gough, Ph.D. ii.—Hydrographical Observations at Irish Light Stations, 1904, * Inland Fisheries * VII. Inland Fisheries. i. —Report on the Artificial Propagation of Salmonidae during the Season of 1901-1905, by E. W. L. Holt,. ii. —Observations on the Spawning Season of the Rainbow Trout, by C. Arens, Fisheulturist, Cleysingen, Germany, (.Translation), iii. —Record of Salmon Marking Experiments in Ireland, 1902-1905, by A. B. E. Hillas, B.A., iv. —Statistical Information relating to the Salmon Fisheries, v. —Substance of Reports received from Clerks of Conservators relative to Salmon Fisheries *
    • Report on the Sea and Inland Fisheries of Ireland for 1905. Part II - Scientific Investigations

      Kemp, S. W.; Byrne, L. W.; Gough, G. C.; Tattersall, W. M.; Hickson, S. J.; Holt, E. W. L.; Farran, G.; Delap, M.; Pearson, J.; Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland; et al. (Dublin, The Stationery Office, 1905)
      I. The Marine Fauna of the Coast of Ireland, Part VII. On the occurrence of the genus Acanthephyra in deep water off the West Coast of Ireland, by Stanley W. Kemp, B.A.. Plates I and II. * II. First report on the Fishes of the Irish Atlantic Slope, by E. W. L. Holt and L. W. Byrne, Plate I. * III. The Foraminifera of Larne Lough and District, by George C. Gough, B.Sc., A.R.C.Sc. (Lond.), F.G.S., Plate I. * IV. The Marine Fauna of the Coast of Ireland, Part VIII. Pelagic Amphipoda of the Irish Atlantic Slope, by W. M. Tattersall, B.Sc., Plates I to V. * V. i.—Remarkable Coelenterata from the West Coast of Ireland, by Sydney J. Hickson, F.R.S. ii.—Branchellion torpedinis, Savigny, by E. W. L. Holt iii.- Lamellaria pelluncida, Verrill, var. by G P Farran, B.A. iv.—Macrura from the West Coast of Ireland, by Stanley W. Kemp B. A. * VI. A list of the Marine Copepoda of Ireland, Part II, Pelagic Species by Joseph Pearson, M.Sc. * VII. i-Notes on the Plankton of Valencia Harbour, 1902-1905 by M & C. Delap, ii-Notes on the Rearing, in an Aquarium, of Aurelia aurita, L., and Pelagia perla (Slabber), by M. J. Delap, Plates I and II. * Inland Fisheries * VIII. i.—Investigations into the Food Requirements of Brown Trout Fry in the Hatching Trough and in the Artificial Redd, by Dr. Walter Hein, Royal Bavarian Biological Laboratory for Fisheries, Munich. (Translation), Plates I and II. ii.—Report on the Artificial Propagation of Salmonidae during the season 1905-1906, by E. W. L. Holt, iii.—Statistical Information relating to the Salmon Fisheries. iv. - Substance of Reports received from Clerks of Conservators relative to Salmon Fisheries.
    • Report on the Sea and Inland Fisheries of Ireland for 1906. Part II - Scientific Investigations

      Farran, G.; Buchanan-Wollaston, H. J.; Gough, G. C.; Holt, E. W. L.; Byrne, L. W.; Green, C.; Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland (Dublin, The Stationery Office, 1906)
      I. On the distribution of the Thaliacea and Pyrosoma in Irish Waters, by G. P. Farran, B.A. * II. Second Report on the Copepoda of the Irish Atlantic Slope, by G. P. Farran, B.A., Plates I to XI. * III. Preliminary Report on the Simple Ascidians of the Larne District, by H. J. Buchanan-Wollaston. * IV. The Bottom Deposits of Larne Lough, by Geo. C. Gough, B.Sc., F.G.S., Map. * V. Second Report on the Fishes of the Irish Atlantic Slope, by E. W. L. Holt and L. W. Byrne, Plates I to V. * VI. Index to the Scientific Publications of the Fisheries Branch of the Department of Agriculture and Technical Instruction for Ireland, 1901-1905, compiled by Charles Green, B.A. * Inland Fisheries * VII. i.— Report on the Artificial Propagation of Salmonidae during the season of 1906-1907, by E. W. L. Holt. ii. —Statistical Information relating to the Salmon Fisheries. iii. —Substance of Reports received from Clerks of Conservators relative to Salmon Fisheries. * VIII. iv.—Summary of Reports relative to Eel Fry, 1905 to 1907, by E. W. L. Holt *
    • Report on the State of the Herring Fisheries North-West of Ireland and West of Scotland

      Molloy, J. (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, 1970)
    • Reports from the FSS mini-symposia 2004-2005

      Codling, E.; Kelly, C.; (eds) (Marine Institute, 2006)
      The mini symposia documented in this publication were meetings organised in October 2004 and August 2005 by the 'Modelling and Simulation' team in Fisheries Science Services (FSS) of the Marine Institute, Ireland. Both symposia took place at the Harbour Hotel in Galway, Ireland. Each meeting consisted of a number of presentations (given as talks or posters) followed by a round-table informal discussion session. The two meetings were attended by participants from FSS and the Marine Institute, BIM (Bord Iascaigh Mara - Irish Sea Fisheries Board), FRS (Fisheries Research Services) Aberdeen, and universities in both Ireland and UK. The Appendix contains a full list of the participants at each meeting, while contact details for those who gave presentations are given at the start of each summary paper.
    • Reports on Salmon Ladders

      Francis, F. (London: Horace Cox, 1870)
      A report on salmon ladders containing original drawings, plans, and sections.
    • Reproduction in Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in Carlingford Lough, Northern Ireland

      Wilson, J H; Seed, R (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1974)
      The reproductive cycles of several Mytilus populations in Carlingford Lough were investigated between November 1968 and May 1971. The annual cycle varied slightly from population to population though spawning began simultaneously at all stations in the spring months when sea temperature was rising rapidly between 7.5° and 12°C. A secondary phase of gametogenesis during the summer months was confirmed by oocyte counts and the onset of the secondary spawning period occurred from 4-8 weeks after the initial spring emission. Although no significant differences were recorded in oocyte size in the different populations immediately before spawning oocyte densities were greatest at the seaward stations. Similarly, low shore populations had higher oocyte densities than those higher in the littoral zone where feeding time is severely curtailed. Size did not seem to influence gametogenesis nor did the severely polluted conditions prevailing in Belfast Lough. Seasonal changes in glycogen and lipid content of the mantle were studied in relation to the annual reproductive cycle. Primary settlement of early plantigrades on algae occurred principally in summer and winter. Secondary settlement on artificial substrates coincided with the disappearance of early plantigrades from the algae.
    • The Reproduction of Calanus finmarchicus off the South Coast of Ireland.

      Farran, G. (Conseil International pour l'Exploration de la Mer (ICES), 1927)
    • Reproductive biology and parasite (Perkinsus marinus) prevalence in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, within a Georgia tidal river

      O'Beirn, F.X.; Walker, R.L.; Jansen, M.L. (Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 1997)
      Recruitment, in 1992, of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, at one site (Flume Dock) within the Sapelo Island National Estuarine Research Reserve (SINERR) was lower than other sampling sites. Recruitment allied with gametogenesis and parasite (Perkinsus marinus) prevalence within the oysters was examined in 1993, in an attempt to explain the differences observed the previous year. Sampling occurred at three sites (Marsh Landing, Jack Hammock, and Flume Dock) along the Duplin River within the SINERR. Oyster recruitment in 1993 was reduced in all sites within the SINERR. No oyster recruitment was recorded at the Flume Dock site during any monthly collections or on collectors deployed for the duration of the sampling study. Oysters developed gametogenically and spawned at the Marsh Landing site two weeks prior to their occurrence at the Jack Hammock site. Gametogenic development in oysters at the Flume Dock site was retarded a further two weeks where the males appeared to spawn six weeks after the females, which could account for reduced recruitment levels at this site. Approximately, twice as many females as males occurred in all sites. Monthly sampling of prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus marinus (Dermo) revealed high levels of both parameters. Smaller oysters did display lower prevalences of Dermo than larger forms.
    • Reproductive biology of the starry smooth-hound shark (Mustelus asterias): geographic variation and implications for sustainable exploitation

      Farrell, E D; Mariani, S; Clarke, M W (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)
      Examination of the reproductive biology of Mustelus asterias in the north-east Atlantic Ocean highlighted apparent geographical variation in maturity, fecundity and ovarian cycle between Atlantic and Mediterranean populations. The stretch total length (LST) and age at 50% maturity for Atlantic males and females were estimated at 78 cm LST and 4–5 years and 87 cm LST and 6 years, respectively. Size at maturity of females was considerably smaller than in Mediterranean specimens (96 cm LST). Ovarian fecundity ranged from eight to 27 oocytes and uterine fecundity from six to 18 embryos. The gestation period was c. 12 months, followed by a resting period of c. 12 months, resulting in a biennial cycle. Females stored sperm in the oviducal gland and, unlike Mediterranean specimens, no uterine compartments were observed in Atlantic specimens. This study reveals the existence of strong, possibly adaptive, divergence in life-history traits in an elasmobranch, whose northern populations may be more susceptible to overexploitation than previously believed.
    • Reproductive cycle of the velvet swimming crab Necora puber (L.) (Decapoda, Brachyura, Portunidae) on the east coast of Ireland

      Bakir, W M A; Healy, B (Department of the Marine, 1995)
      An unfished population of Necora puber, in a coastal area just south of Dublin, was sampled monthly between August 1986 and November 1987 using baited creels. The reproductive cycle was analysed using gonad stages, the incidence and size distribution of ovigerous females and developmental stages of the egg masses. Both sexes started to breed at a carapace width of about 50 mm when they were about one year old. Seven ovarian and six testicular stages were recognised, both macro- and microscopically. The ovary underwent continuous cyclical changes and there was no distinct winter resting period. All ovigerous females had developing or ripe ovaries and they may thus produce more than one brood in a season. The main breeding season started in February with the greatest number of ovigerous females found in March-June and a peak in May. Less than 10% of females were ovigerous from August to January. The main periods of larval release were April, June and August. Spawning and recovering males were present throughout the year. Differences between the observed reproductive cycle and those studied in Britain and Spain are discussed.
    • Reproductive Failure of Landlocked Atlantic Salmon from New York's Finger Lakes: Investigations into the Etiology and Epidemiology of the “Cayuga Syndrome”

      Fisher, J.P.; Spitsbergen, J.M.; Rodman, G.; symula, j. (American Fisheries Society, 1995)
      We describe a disease syndrome that afflicts larval, landlocked Atlantic salmon Salmo salar from Cayuga Lake, one of central New York's Finger Lakes. Mortality associated with the “Cayuga syndrome” is 98–100%. Death usually occurs between 650 and 850 centigrade degreedays after fertilization, approximately 2–4 weeks before yolk resorption is complete. Although there is minor temporal variation in the onset of the Cayuga syndrome in progeny from individual females, all sac fry eventually succumb. Incubation of embryos and sac fry under constant, ambient, or reduced temperature regimens slightly alters the degree-day timing of syndrome onset, but does not improve survival. Based on mortality rate, manifestation of the Cayuga syndrome has not changed in the past 10 years, even though incubation waters of varying chemistry and temperature have been used. Mortality of the negative control stocks used for these studies never exceeded 10% from hatching to first feeding. Findings from reciprocal crossbreeding experiments indicate the problem is associated with ova only. A noninfectious etiology is indicated by the lack of consistently identifiable fish pathogens from syndrome-afflicted sac fry and by the failure to transmit the condition horizontally. Suspect contaminants were eliminated as potential causative factors. Epidemiological studies on the viability of other Finger Lakes stocks indicate that Atlantic salmon from Keuka and Seneca lakes are also afflicted (100% mortality). yet those from Skaneateles Lake are not. The cause of this syndrome appears to be nutritional.
    • RESCALE: Review and Simulate Climate and Catchment Responses at Burrishoole

      Fealy, R.; Allot, N.; Borderick, C.; deEyto, E.; Dillane, M.; Erdil, R. M.; Jennings, E.; McCrann, K.; Murphy, C.; O'Toole, C.; et al. (Marine Insitute, 2010)
      The climate of the Burrishoole catchment is projected to change significantly over the present century. Previous research of the catchment identified a scientific gap in knowledge in terms of understanding the implications of present and projected future changes in stream flow, water temperature, pH levels and DO concentrations on fish productivity in the catchment. To address this, a multidisciplinary team of scientists undertook an analysis of both present and likely future climate impacts on the catchment with a view to furthering the understanding of the inter-linkages between climate, climate change, and the freshwater ecosystem. The research findings outlined in the report provide climate change information at the catchment scale to assist catchment stakeholders in integrating climate change considerations into their decision-making processes. The report presents an in-depth assessment of the climate and environmental datasets from the catchment to establish if changes have occurred over the period of record. In order to assess the likely impacts of future changes in climate on the catchment, regional climate projections were developed and subsequently employed to simulate likely responses in stream flow and temperature, DOC and DO for the present century. The projected changes in both the climate and water-quality were then used to provide a basis for assessing impacts on fish growth and survival rates of salmonid and eel species in the catchment. The report provides a useful template for future studies, not just in the Burrishoole catchment but for other ecologically important catchments. The findings from the report are relevant to policy makers at the national scale; catchment managers at the regional scale; and, specifically, to stakeholders in the Burrishoole catchment, in developing adaptive responses to climate change.
    • Research on Pancreas Disease in Irish Farmed Salmon 2004/2005 – Current and Future Initiatives

      Rodger, H; Graham, D; Foyle, L; Norris, A; Ratcliff, J; Murphy, K; Mitchell, S; Staples, C; Jewhurst, H; Todd, D; et al. (Marine Institute, 2005)
      Pancreas Disease is the most significant single infectious disease affecting marine salmon farms in Ireland. The first epidemiological studies of Pancreas Disease (PD) in Ireland in the early 1990’s indicated that significant losses occurred in farmed Atlantic salmon in their first year at sea on some individual farms (Menzies et al., 1996). A serological survey for the presence of Salmon Pancreas Disease Virus (SPDV) antibody in 1996 revealed that 53% of Irish sites were positive, but that not all positive sites had recognised clinical signs of PD. This indicated a relatively low incidence and severity of PD at that time (McLoughlin et al., 1998) and this pattern persisted throughout the remainder of the 1990’s. In 2002, a serious increase in both the incidence and severity of PD was reported on farmed Atlantic salmon marine sites in Ireland. An epidemiological survey of Irish sites for 2002 revealed that 59% of sites reported an outbreak of PD, with mortalities averaging 12% (range 1 – 42%; McLoughlin et al., 2003). A recent study using data collected for 2003 and 2004 indicated that PD occurred in 62% and 86% of sites respectively. The average mortality due to PD on affected farms was 18.8% in 2003 and 14.8% in 2004. In response to these significant losses due to PD a range of research initiatives was launched in Ireland and was supported by the Marine Institute. This document gives an overview of the most recent findings from the current projects, carried out in 2004/2005 and also provides an overview of the various actions in Scotland and Norway, where PD has also become a disease of economic significance in salmon aquaculture.
    • Research Surveys and Dedicated Training - Compendium of Shiptime Awards 2007

      Corless, R. (ed) (Marine Institute, 2010)
      A description of research surveys and ship-based training programmes carried out during 2007 on board the national research vessels, funded under the Marine Research Sub-programme of the National Development Plan (2007-’13).
    • Research Surveys and Dedicated Training - Compendium of Shiptime Awards 2008

      Corless, R. (Marine Institute, 2010)
      A description of research surveys and ship-based training programmes carried out during 2008 on board the national research vessels, funded under the Marine Research Sub-programme of the National Development Plan (2007-’13)
    • The response of North Atlantic diadromous fish to multiple stressors including land use change: a multidecadal study

      de Eyto, E.; Dalton, C.; Dillane, M.; Jennings, E.; McGinnity, P.; O'Dwyer, B.; Poole, R.; Rogan, G.; Taylor, D. (NRC Research Press, 2016)
      Reduction of freshwater habitat quality due to land use change can have significant impacts on diadromous fish. Partitioning this impact from other potential drivers, such as changing marine conditions and climate, is hampered by a lack of long term datasets. Here, four decades of data were used to assess the impact of land use change on <i>Salmo salar</i> L. and anadromous <i>Salmo trutta</i> L. in the Burrishoole catchment, Ireland, one of the few index sites for diadromous fish in the North Atlantic. Land use change was found to have no significant impact on the freshwater survival of either salmon or trout. However, climate impacted significantly on the survival of salmon and trout in freshwater, with poor survival in years with wetter warmer winters, coinciding with positive North Atlantic Oscillation values. Additionally, cold springs were associated with higher survival in trout. The addition of hatchery salmon into the salmon spawning cohort coincided with low freshwater survival. Our results highlight the necessity for a broad ecosystem approach in any conservation effort of these species.