• Gbm.auto: A software tool to simplify spatial modelling and Marine Protected Area planning

      Dedman, Simon; Officer, Rick; Clarke, Maurice; Reid, David G.; Brophy, Deirdre (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2017)
      Boosted Regression Trees. Excellent for data-poor spatial management but hard to use Marine resource managers and scientists often advocate spatial approaches to manage data-poor species. Existing spatial prediction and management techniques are either insufficiently robust, struggle with sparse input data, or make suboptimal use of multiple explanatory variables. Boosted Regression Trees feature excellent performance and are well suited to modelling the distribution of data-limited species, but are extremely complicated and time-consuming to learn and use, hindering access for a wide potential user base and therefore limiting uptake and usage. BRTs automated and simplified for accessible general use with rich feature set We have built a software suite in R which integrates pre-existing functions with new tailor-made functions to automate the processing and predictive mapping of species abundance data: by automating and greatly simplifying Boosted Regression Tree spatial modelling, the gbm.auto R package suite makes this powerful statistical modelling technique more accessible to potential users in the ecological and modelling communities. The package and its documentation allow the user to generate maps of predicted abundance, visualise the representativeness of those abundance maps and to plot the relative influence of explanatory variables and their relationship to the response variables. Databases of the processed model objects and a report explaining all the steps taken within the model are also generated. The package includes a previously unavailable Decision Support Tool which combines estimated escapement biomass (the percentage of an exploited population which must be retained each year to conserve it) with the predicted abundance maps to generate maps showing the location and size of habitat that should be protected to conserve the target stocks (candidate MPAs), based on stakeholder priorities, such as the minimisation of fishing effort displacement. Gbm.auto for management in various settings By bridging the gap between advanced statistical methods for species distribution modelling and conservation science, management and policy, these tools can allow improved spatial abundance predictions, and therefore better management, decision-making, and conservation. Although this package was built to support spatial management of a data-limited marine elasmobranch fishery, it should be equally applicable to spatial abundance modelling, area protection, and stakeholder engagement in various scenarios.
    • General Biosecurity

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2011)
      This leaflet gives information on general aquaculture biosecurity. Biosecurity in aquaculture can be defined as a set of management practices put in place to prevent the introduction of disease causing organisms onto a site.
    • General Methods for Storage of Lobsters

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1972)
      This publication discusses the three types of storage unit used for holding lobsters in Ireland; (A) Tidal pounds (B) Recirculation or direct circulation pounds (C) High density units
    • A genetic marker for the maternal identification of Atlantic salmon × brown trout hybrids

      Karlsson, S.; Hagen, M.; Eriksen, L.; Hindar, K.; Jensen, A.; De Leaniz, C.; Cotter, D.; Guobergsson, G.; Kahilainen, K.; Guojonsson, S.; et al. (Springer Netherlands, 2013)
      Interspecific hybridization between Atlantic salmon and brown trout is well documented, but why it should vary so much among populations is not clear. Determining the maternal origin of hybrids can provide insights into the mechanisms underlying interspecific hybridization, but this information is lacking in many studies. Here we present a species-specific mitochondrial DNA marker for the identification of the maternal origin of hybrids. This marker involves only one PCR step followed by fragment analysis, can be integrated within PCR multiplexing for existing nuclear markers for hybrid identification, and is therefore faster and more cost-effective than previous methods.
    • Genetic variability in marine bivalvia: implications and applications in molluscan mariculture

      Wilkins, N P (Universa Press, 1976)
      The extent of genetic variability at enzyme gene loci is assessed in twelve species of marine bivalve molluscs of actual or potential commercial importance. Approximately one third of these loci are polymorphic, average heterozygosity is 0.14, and an average of 3.9 alleles are segregating per polymorphic locus. Hatchery-produced samples exhibit a lower proportion of polymorphic loci and a loss of some alleles at polymorphic loci. In two hatchery-produced families of Crassostrea gigas, phenotype frequencies at two loci depart from Mendelian expectations in young individuals. The implications of these hatchery induced alterations are discussed, together with some possible applications of biochemical genetics in molluscan mariculture.
    • GeoDI: Geoscientific Data Integration

      Lassoued, Yassine (Marine Institute, 2013)
      This report summarises the findings of the GeoDI project. Large volumes of geoscientific (i.e., geological and geophysical) datasets have been gathered by the Marine Institute and its partners over the past number of years, A key challenge now exists to derive maximum value from these very costly and valuable products by integrating these geoscientific datasets together, and with other resources such as biological, chemical, and environmental data. The project aimed to address this challenge by examining the critical issues involved in the integration of Irish marine geoscientific datasets, and by assessing tools and services for enhanced management, discovery, access, and analyses of geoscientific data.
    • Geography - The Deep Unknown Presentation

      Marine Institute; Tulca (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The Deep Unknown Presentation is a PowerPoint presentation that helps teachers and primary school students discover the Mid Atlantic Ridge and what lies beneath 3,000kms under the sea. It offers a simple explanation of hydrothermal vents, what they are and how these physical features of our planet form.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th class - Seashore Safety and Conservation Code and quiz

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      Prior to going to the seashore, the children will create a poster to show their understanding of learning about safety on the seashore and the conservation code. Through this they will learn to care for their local environment as well as becoming environmentally aware and active.The children will have developed a sense of place and space knowing learning about their local seashore.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th class - Gravity and Tides and understanding how Tides affect me

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The children will learn about how the earth, moon and sun interact though gravity. The students will develop an understanding of what causes tides. The students will also investigate the importance of tidal prediction and learn to read tide tables.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th class - Organising a Beach Clean and Beach Clean Survey template

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The children will conduct a beach clean to show the benefits of caring for their local environment and ocean, as well as becoming environmentally aware and active. The children will have developed a sense of place and space knowing learning about their local seashore.
    • Geography: 1st and 2nd Class - Learn about an Oceanographer that works in the local community (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children investigate the work of people in a range of locations in the locality. The students will become familiar with the range of different work oceanographers do.
    • Geography: 1st and 2nd Class - Observing and Investigating Place Names near the Seashore (Irish and English Versions available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to identify, explore and discuss aspects of some major natural features in the local environment including a seashore, estuary, bays, inlets, harbours and islands
    • Geography: 3rd and 4th Class - Exploring the Fishing Industry in Ireland (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to explore and investigate, especially through practical studies of a small number of the common marine related economic activities of people in the locality and in a contrasting part of Ireland.
    • Geography: 3rd and 4th Class - Visualising the Seashore Habitat (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to observe and explore ways in which features of the natural environment affected the lives of plants, animals and humans. Study the beach as a habitat for plants and animals.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th Class - Learning about Fisherman and Farmers Working in My Local Area (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to explore and investigate especially through practical studies one or more of the important economic activities of people in their locality - such as the work of fishermen and farmers.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th class - Marine explorers and scientists

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson provides students with an opportunity to learn about people and places in Ireland. With a focus on marine science, the students will learn about the type of work marine scientists are involved with and the environments they work in. By using the famous VENTure expedition where the Moytirra hydrothermal vents field were discovered in the Mid-Atlantic, the students will investigate, record and communicate their findings about scientists such as Dr Andy Wheeler, the chief scientist of this survey. Students can also learn about the people he works with on the research vessel, the RV Celtic Explorer.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th Class - Researching Coastal Erosion (Irish and English Version available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2014)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to observe and develop a simple understanding of the links between erosion of coastline and the results it has on our beaches.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th class - The deep unknown - discover the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and hydrothermal vents

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson provides students with an understanding of the physical features of the world – under the ocean. Students will learn about tectonic plates and underwater features such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The students will discover how physical features such as hydrothermal vents form in this natural environment, deep under the ocean.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th Class : Marine explorers and scientists – learning about people and places

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2018)
      The lesson provides students with an opportunity to learn about people and places in Ireland. With a focus on marine science and seismology, the students will learn about the type of work marine scientists and seismologists are involved with and the environments they work in. This lesson plan can be adapted to follow and study the life of any scientist on a scientific survey. Students can also learn about the people that work on the research vessel, the research vessel RV Celtic Explorer.
    • Geography: 5th and 6th Class – What I would do with the Real Map of Ireland (Irish and English Version Available)

      Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2015)
      The aim of the lesson plan is for children to learn about the size of Ireland’s marine territory and identify its ocean and seas. From this they will develop and understanding about the importance of the territory as a marine resource that can be developed in a sustainable way