• Second report on the fishes of the Irish Atlantic Slope

      Holt, E. W. L.; Byrne, L. W. (His Majesty's Stationary Office, Dublin, 1909)
      Many of the fishes which inhabit the deeper water of the Atlantic coast are unfamiliar to fishermen, and were not described in the books to which the general reader had ready access in the early 1900s. It was therefore the intention of the authors to give an account and figure; or sketch, of all except the well-known kinds. This is the second report in an occasional series on the fishes of the Irish Atlantic Slope.
    • The Fry of Salmon and Trout

      Anon. (Department of Agriculture, 1938)
      Every year large numbers of salmon fry (parr and smolts) are destroyed, sometimes quite unwittingly, by anglers who are unable to distinguish between salmon fry and young trout. Under Section 73 of the Fisheries (Ireland) Act, 1842, it is illegal to take the fry of either salmon or trout. The term “trout fry” has not yet received a legal interpretation but in some Fishery Districts the taking of immature trout below a certain size is prohibited by by-law. The fry of salmon are legally deemed to include also those fish locally called "jenkin" and "gravelling."
    • Salmon and Trout: Natural and Artificial Propagation as Factors in the Maintenance of Stocks

      Anon. (Department of Agriculture, 1939)
      The object of fishery regulations whether statutory or departmental is, in the ultimate, conservation. That is to say, it is sought by the imposition of certain restrictions to ensure such a run of fish for breeding purposes as will increase or at least maintain the stocks. Many citizens profess dissatisfaction with the existing stocks of fish in our rivers and lakes and persistently urge that they should be enhanced by all practical means. Generally the method which suggests itself to such persons is the setting up of a hatchery, to be operated either by stripping fish captured locally or by procuring supplies of ova (eggs) from outside sources. There seems to be a rather widespread belief that such a procedure even on a modest scale is bound to produce immediately beneficial results for the waters concerned. In other words, the operation of a hatchery is expected to offset completely the evils of over-fishing, as well as the damage resulting from illegal activities (whether within or outside the fishing season) and the reduction in stocks caused by predatory birds, fish and mammals added to the pollution of waters by the entrance of deleterious matter. Such a belief is, however, fallacious as it cannot be accepted in any degree without serious reservation.
    • Prawn Fishing

      Gibson, F A (Department of Lands, 1956)
      The common prawn (Leander serratus) is widely distributed around the Irish coasts, but obviously varies in abundance from place to place. This prawn should not be mistaken for the Norway Lobster, sometimes called the Dublin Bay Prawn (Nephrops norvegicus) or with the brown shrimp (Crangon vulgaris). Alive, the common prawn is a grey-brown colour and has blue bands on its legs. The Norway lobster is a pink colour, and its body is profusely covered with white tipped spines. The common prawn also has a projection from its head, called a rostrum, which is absent from the shrimp. As the prawn is of economic importance, some notes on simple methods of capture will be of interest to fishermen.
    • Some notes on crab fishing

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1957)
      Specific fishing on a commercial scale for the edible crab is practised only to a limited extent in this country and, although fairly substantial quantities of edible crabs are landed annually, these are largely the by-product of creel fishing for lobsters and crawfish. These notes give a short account of certain crab fishing methods and record the results of some experimental fishing undertaken by the Fisheries Division.
    • Escallop fishing around Ireland

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1957)
      There are, at present, two main centres of escallop fishing around the Irish coasts, one situated in the inlets forming the north side of Galway Bay, and the other along this south-west coast from Schull, County Cork, to Valentia, County Kerry, the beds exploited in these areas are all inshore, ranging from a short distance to about two miles beyond low water mark and in depths varying from two to twenty fathoms. Extensive beds are uncommon, most of them being small and located between rocky areas where the bottom is suitable. Escallops are generally taken in the months of October to April. Minimum size limits are enforced.
    • Review of the Irish Salmon Industry

      Went, A. E. J. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries [Fisheries Division], 1965)
      For centuries the salmon has been an important item of commerce in Ireland and in many parts of the country today it is still very important in the general economy of the people, who gain a living directly or indirectly from it. It is important from two points of view. It provides sport for the angler and it supports a commercial fishery. There are three other articles in this issue: II. SALMON OF THE RIVER SHANNON (1957 to 1962) - Eileen Twomey; III. THE EFFECTS OF ARTERIAL DRAINAGE WORKS ON THE SALMON STOCK OF A TRIBUTORY OF THE RIVER MOY - E.D. Toner, Ann O’Riordan & Eileen Twomey; IV. RECAPTURES OF IRISH TAGGED SALMON OFF GREENLAND - A.E.J. Went.
    • Irish Sprats and Sandeels

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1967)
      In 1965, Ireland imported approximately 13,235 tons of fishmeal for animal feeding stuffs, valued at £827,506. For some time now cosideration has been given to the fish resources around our coasts and whether it would be possible to provide a constant source of supply of materials to the fishmeal industry and the growing number of mink and trout farms. This paper investigates this issue.
    • Notes On Some Irish Estuarine And Inshore Fishes (With records of the distribution of shads by Eileen Twomey, M.Sc )

      Bracken, J J; Kennedy, M (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1967)
      This paper brings together data collected in various ways by the authors, over a period of years. Some of the material described is a by-product of investigations, the primary results of which have already been published. Other material is supplementary to data previously published.
    • Irish Investigation on the Lobster (Homarus vulgaris Edw.)

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1967)
      Commercially the lobster (Homarua vulgaris Edw.) is the most important shellfish in Ireland. The Irish coast is deeply indented, except on the east, and is well suited for the exploitation of lobsters. Even on the east coast amidst a predominantly sandy shoreline, a number of discreet areas are fished actively.
    • Stocks of Nephrops norvegicus off the south coast of Ireland

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1967)
      Nephrops norvegicus is also known popularly as the Dublin Bay Prawn or Norway Lobster. The stocks of prawns in depths down to 60 fathoms (109m) have been studies since 1956, off the south of Ireland, from Mine Head, Co. Waterford, to the Kenmare River, Co. Kerry. The present paper is concerned with data obtained from the research vessel Cú Feasa, together with other samples collected from commercial fishing boats, during the years 1963 to 1966 inclusive.
    • The Movement of Salmon (Salmo Salar) Through an Estuary and a Fish-Pass

      Jackson, P. A.; Howie, D. I. D. (Department of the Marine, 1967)
      In this paper we have attempted to analyze in quantitative terms the behaviour of the salmon of the River Erne during the important phase of migration when the fish first enter brackish and fresh water.
    • The Early Life of Brown Trout (Salmo Trutta L.)

      Kennedy, M.; Fitzmaurice, P. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries [Fisheries Division], 1968)
      The programme of research included field and laboratory studies of certain aspects of the early life history of the trout that are considered below.
    • "Specimen" Brown Trout and Sea Trout From Irish Waters

      Went, A. E. J. (Department of the Marine, 1968)
      The present paper deals with all the material collected up to the end of the 1967 fishing season and relates to brown trout of 10 lb weight and upwards and sea trout of 6 lb and upwards.
    • The Whiting Fishery Off Counties Dublin and Louth On the East Coast of Ireland

      Hillis, J P (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1968)
      The whiting Merlangius merlangus (L) has for over 30 years been the leading demersal species by weight in the landings of commercial fisheries on the east coast of Ireland. The present study was commenced in the autumn of 1959, using samples of both the commercial fishery and the research vessel Cú Feasa. The present paper describes the commercial catch from port samples supplemented with research vessel material where extra detail is desirable.
    • South Coast (Waterford and Cork) Herring Fishery 1968-1969

      Molloy, J P (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1969)
      The 1968/69 herring season proper commenced on November 27, 1968 and terminated on February 17, 1969. Prior to November 27, however, some small quantities of herrings had been taken by boats over a large area extending from Hook Head to the Daunt Rock. Fifty nine Irish boats made catches throughout the season and a total of 70,781 crans of herrings were landed which was an increase of 7,438 crans (11%o)n the figure for the previous season. Landings were made on 60 days out of a possible 70. The season, which began later than usual, was very disappointing before Christmas, due mainly to adverse weather conditions and the absence of shoals in inshore waters, After Christmas, however, landings of herrings increased substantially and fishing during January and February was exceptionally heavy, with the result that the total landings for the 1968/69 season were the greatest on record. As in the 1967/68 season, fishing was restricted after Christmas at times due to marketing problems which caused the closure of the ports on a number of occasions. The overall catch would otherwise have been considerably higher. Almost all landings of herrings were made at Dunmore East and Cobh.
    • The Winter Herring Fishery of the North-West of Ireland (1968-69)

      Molloy, J; Kennedy, T D (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1969)
      The 1968/69 winter herring fishery off the Donegal, North Mayo and Sligo coasts began in mid October, 1968 and continued until the end of January, 1969. A total of 63,821 crans were landed during the season as compared with 55,193 crans landed during the 1967/68 season. The majority of the landings mere made at the ports of Killybegs, Sligo and Burtonport. A feature of the season was the increased landings made at Sligo by both local and Killybegs boats.
    • A Review of the Dunmore East Herring Fishery (1962-1968)

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1969)
      The winter herring fishery off the south coast of Ireland, based on what is commonly called the Dunmore stock, has been studied in detail by earlier workers and particularly by Bracken and Burd (1965). In their paper, they reviewed the fishery up to 1963 and arrived at conclusions regarding the economic yield of the fishery. They stated that, “ with the major spawning grounds (where the intense fishery takes place) situated within Irish exclusive fishery limits, there is considerable scope for the control of effort in such a way that, for the first time, a herring stock might be rationally exploited”. Since 1963, certain changes have taken place in respect of the stocks themselves and the fishing to which they are subjected. The purpose of this paper is to bring these changes to light and to compare the state of the fishery during the seasons 1962/63 to 1967/68 with that during the period of Braken’s and Burd’s observations.
    • The Irish shellfish industry 1948-1967

      Gibson, F A (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1969)
      The term shellfish is used to group together two very large orders of the animal kingdom, namely the Crustacea and the Molluscs. These orders are not closely related to each other; the main characteristics they have in common being that neither of' them has an internal supporting structure or skeleton. However, they live in similar environments, mainly in the sea, although a few inhabit fresh water, Many hundreds of individual species occur in Irish waters, but only a small number of these are commercially important. These include lobsters, crawfish, Dublin Bay prawns (Nephrops), crabs (all crustaceans), periwinkles, oysters, escallops, mussels, cockles, whelks and clams (all molluscs). During the twenty year period 1948 to 1967, reviewed in this paper, the Irish shellfish industry has changed in many respects. In some sectors methods of fishing have been improved, farming techniques have been introduced and the development of markets on Continental Europe has encouraged the use of improved methods of handling and transport of shellfish to these distant destinations, Nevertheless the rate of expansion of the shellfish industry has been comparatively slow.
    • Irish Pike Investigations

      Kennedy, M. (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries [Fisheries Division], 1969)
      The spawning of pike was studied in 1965 and 1966 in five large Irish limestone lakes-Loughs Sheelin, Ennell, Mask, Corrib and Arrow. The spawning period was found to be February to April. Spawning took place in shallow, sheltered situations where there was a carpet of dead or living vegetation on the bottom at a depth of 20 to 60 cm. Spawning took place by day, at a water temperature of at least 9-1O C, when lake levels were high or rising. Gill-net catches reached a peak during periods of spawning. Weather conditions in February and March were much milder in 1966 than in 1965, and spawning began about a month earlier than in 1965. The eggs of Irish pike are 2.7 to 3.0 cm in diameter. They are golden to honey coloured, with a great many minute oil-globules distributed through the yolk in numerous tiny clusters. The incubation period in the field is probably 8-14 days, and the newly hatched larva is 8.0-9.0 mm long. For the first 10 days or so, the larvae hang vertically from the vegetation by means of adhesive glands on the head. They then become free-swimming, and soon afterwards begin to feed. At this stage they measure 13.0-13.5 mm. Their first food consists of small cladocera and copepods. Later, they feed on larger cladocera, amphipods, isopods, young stages of aquatic insects, and fish fry.