The Marine Institute is the national agency responsible for Marine Research, Technology Development and Innovation (RTDI). We seek to assess and realise the economic potential of Ireland's 220 million acre marine resource; promote the sustainable development of marine industry through strategic funding programmes and essential scientific services; and safeguard our marine environment through research and environmental monitoring.

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  • International Blue Whiting Spawning Stock Survey (IBWSS) Spring 2021

    Marine Institute; Wageningen Marine Research; PINRO; Faroe Marine Research Institute; Danish Institute for Fisheries Research; Spanish Institute of Oceanography; Institute of Marine Research (Marine Institute, 2021)
    Coordination of the survey was initiated at the meeting of the Working Group on International Pelagic Surveys (WGIPS) in January 2021 and continued by correspondence until the start of the survey. During the survey effort was refined and adjusted by the survey coordinator (Norway) using real time observations. The survey design was based on methods described in ICES Manual for International Pelagic Surveys (ICES, 2015). Weather conditions were regarded as exceptionally poor and all vessels experienced multiple days of downtime, with the exception of the Spanish vessel working in the Porcupine Seabight. This considered, the stock was covered comprehensively and contained within the survey area. The entire survey was completed in 19 days, below 21-day target threshold.
  • Shellfish Stocks and Fisheries Review 2020: an assessment of selected stocks

    Marine Institute; Bord Iascaigh Mhara (Marine Institute, 2021)
    addition, data on the fleet and landings of shellfish species (excluding Nephrops and mussels) are presented. The intention of this annual review is to present stock assessment and management advice for shellfisheries that may be subject to new management proposals or where scientific advice is required in relation to assessing the environmental impact of shellfish fisheries especially in areas designated under European Directives. The review reflects the recent work of the Marine Institute (MI) in the biological assessment of shellfish fisheries and their interaction with the environment. The information and advice presented here for shellfish is complementary to that presented in the MI Stock Book on demersal and pelagic fisheries. Separate treatment of shellfish is warranted as their biology and distribution, the assessment methods that can be applied to them and the system under which they are managed, all differ substantially to demersal and pelagic stocks. Shellfish stocks are not generally assessed by The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and although they come under the competency of the Common Fisheries Policy they are generally not regulated by EU TAC and in the main, other than crab and scallop, are distributed inside the national 12 nm fisheries limit. Management of these fisheries is within the competency of the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine (DAFM). A co-operative management framework introduced by the Governing Department and BIM in 2005 (Anon 2005), and under which a number of fishery management plans were developed, was, in 2014, replaced by the National and Regional Inshore Fisheries Forums (NIFF, RIFFs). These bodies are consultative forums, the members of which are representative of the inshore fisheries sector and other stakeholder groups. The National forum (NIFF) provides a structure with which each of the regional forums can interact with each other and with the Marine Agencies, DAFM and the Minister. Management of oyster fisheries is the responsibility of The Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE) implemented through Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI). In many cases, however, management responsibility for oysters is devolved through Fishery Orders or Aquaculture licences to local co-operatives. The main customers for this review are DAFM, RIFFs, NIFF and other Departments and Authorities listed above
  • Lance -the Miniboat

    Dow, Kaitlyn (Kaitlyn Dow, 2017)
    The illustrated story of Lance was presented to the Marine Institute during the author’s visit to Ireland. Kaitlyn Dow tells the story of the adventures of the Lancer the miniboat, that was launched from the USA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) research vessel Neil Armstrong. The miniboat project was completed as part of her secondary school project, Waterford CT Highschool from Connecticut, USA and supported by AORA-CSA who had formed a partnership in 2016 with Educational Passages mini-sailboats in the USA. The Lancer boat was fitted with a GPS tracker to monitor how it might get caught in the Atlantic's ocean currents and ended up sailing into Droim, Leitir Móir, Galway where it was found by primary school student Méabh Ní Ghionnáin. The boat was repaired by Méabh and her family and relaunched from the Marine Institute's research vessel RV Celtic Explorer on the 22nd April 2017, in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.
  • An Ocean of Stories! An Anthology of Children’s Ocean Stories, by children for children

    Madigan, Carmel T. (The Loophead Summer Hedge School, 2021)
    An Ocean of Stories - An Anthology of Children’s Ocean Stories, by children for children include over fifty stories selected, from fourteen participating classes, with a selection of at least three contributions from each class. Over 300 children from County Clare and County Limerick produced stories, artwork and poems that were inspired by the ocean, as part of the Explorers Education Programme’s project in 2020-2021. The stories chosen for the final anthology were selected on the basis of good writing, diversity of personal ocean based experiences and imagination. The stories are truly beautiful, expressive, engaging, intriguing, thoughtful, succinct, and make for wonderful insightful reading, whatever your age. These stories are the children’s own, their lived experiences intertwined with creative thinking, even fantasy at times, while some are pure fact or pure fiction. All these stories are lovely to read and the reader will feel enriched having read them.
  • Blue Carbon and Marine Carbon Sequestration in Irish Waters and Coastal Habitats

    Cott, Grace; Beca-Carretero, Pedro; Stengel, Dagmar (Marine Institute, 2021)
    Atmospheric CO2 is rising globally. Opportunities for reducing this trend include energy sector adjustments and management of both land and ocean resources. Improved management of coastal and oceanic ecosystems is therefore poised to contribute to, and enhance, climate mitigation and adaptation. This report outlines the emergence of blue carbon as a concept for the integration of coastal carbon dynamics into policy and management frameworks and defines blue carbon ecosystems. It also emphasises the importance of marine carbon sequestration and highlights its potential role in climate adaptation. Ireland is estimated to store at least 9.2 Mt of carbon in its saltmarsh and seagrass habitats, which cover an estimated minimum area of 162 km2. Estimates of carbon stocks in potential blue carbon ecosystems such as macroalgae beds are hampered by lack of data on extent, productivity and actual contribution. Irish coastal blue carbon ecosystems and their carbon sequestration capacity are currently threatened by anthropogenic factors such as land reclamation and poor water quality. The possibility of including saltmarsh and seagrass habitats in Ireland’s National Inventory Report on GHG emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and including Ireland’s potential blue carbon ecosystems in Ireland’s Nationally Determined Contributions is highlighted. The critical knowledge gaps and future research priorities are outlined, so that Ireland can advance the pace of scientific discovery whilst harnessing the climate change potential of its coastal and marine environment.
  • Ocean Citizen Survey: Perceptions of the Irish public on priorities for the protection and sustainable use of the ocean

    French, Veronica; McDonough, N (Marine Institute, 2020)
    The European Union (EU) has a bold and ambitious aspiration to restore European marine and freshwater ecosystems by 2030, by reducing human pressures on marine and freshwater environments, restoring degraded ecosystems and sustainably harnessing the essential goods and services they provide. A group of top EU experts have put forward an ambitious proposal for a “Mission Starfish”. This major flagship ‘mission’ for healthy ocean, seas, coastal and inland waters is to be funded by the EU under the forthcoming Horizon Europe Framework Programme (2021-2027) and will also need to be supported by other EU, national and regional funding programmes. To achieve its goal, the mission aims to raise awareness of the importance of healthy oceans, seas, coastal and inland waters among citizens and help develop solutions on a range of issues. Citizens are crucial to the design and accomplishment of the mission in helping to set objectives and targets and ensuring that missions like this one make a real difference in everybody’s lives. As part of the European Commission’s engagement with citizens across multiple EU countries on the mission, the Marine Institute developed a survey to consult Irish citizens and seek their views on what they believe are the top priorities for the health of the ocean and inland waters and how we can sustainably use and benefit from marine and aquatic resources. The survey was based around two areas of the proposed mission, namely: filling the knowledge and emotional gap, and; decarbonising our ocean, seas and waters. The survey was launched online on 13 August 2020 and was open for four weeks. This report presents the results of the survey summarising the opinions expressed by the 1013 respondents. The results provide an insight into people’s opinions and levels of awareness of our ocean, seas, coastal and inland waters and will inform the mission planning.
  • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore: Living Things - Simple Presentation

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Burke, Noirin (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore PowerPoint LIVING THINGS SIMPLE PRESENTATION can be used for junior science classes learning about living things on the seashore. The presentation looks at seaweeds and a selection of the different types of animals that are found on the seashore including jellyfish, crabs and fish. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard.
  • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore – Sorting and Classifying Seashore Animals Presentation

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Burke, Noirin (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore PowerPoint SORTING & CLASSIFYING SEASHORE ANIMALS Presentation can be used for science classes learning about living things as well as other cross curricular lesson plans. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard. The presentation includes lots of photographs of the seashore animals.
  • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore – Living Things Seashore Ecology Presentation

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Burke, Noirin (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore PowerPoint LIVING THINGS SEASHORE ECOLOGY Presentation can be used for science classes learning about living things as well as other cross curricular lesson plans. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard. The presentation includes lots of photographs of the seashore animals.
  • Year in Review 2020

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2021)
    This Year in Review 2020 is a snapshot of some of the Marine Institute's many highlights and achievements during an eventful year.
  • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore Species Activity sheets and Worksheets

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore Species Activity sheets and Work sheets can be used to support cross curricular teaching including science – living things, languages and the arts. The materials cover a range of seashore animal illustrations and questions. The sheets are divided into species and include Shellfish, Crustaceans, Fish, Jellies & Corals, Stars and Urchins and lots more.
  • Tuarascáil Bhliantúil 2019

    Foras na Mara (Foras na Mara, 2021)
  • Annual Report 2019

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2021)
  • Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore Species Illustrations for Visual Arts

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Explorers Wild About Wildlife on the Seashore Species Illustrations for Visual Arts include over twenty seashore animal illustrations that can be used for visual arts and other cross curricular lesson plans. The visual arts sheets maybe used for projects and visual art classes including colouring, painting or use of textiles to demonstrate the children’s discovery and understanding of the seashore. The sheets are divided into species and include Shellfish, Crustaceans, Fish, Jellies & Corals, Stars & Urchins and lots more, and provide a caption box for children to write fun facts and details of their work. Click 'View more files' below the thumbnail images for more worksheets.
  • Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore Information sheets

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear (Marine Institute, 2021)
    In Ireland we are surrounded by so many different types of beaches ranging from sandy to shingle shores, as well as mudflats to rocky shore lines. This makes it an extremely exciting place to explore all of the amazing animals, seaweeds, plants and creatures that live there. The Explorers Wild about Wildlife on the Seashore information sheets can be used in the classroom to help teachers and children with their scientific discovery, learning more about the animals found on the Irish seashore.
  • The Real Map of Ireland

    INFOMAR (Marine Institute, 2019)
    Ireland’s marine territory extends far beyond our coastline up to 220 million acres (approx. 880,000km2), an area more than 10 times our land mass. The 'Real Map of Ireland' was developed using seabed information gathered as part of a major programme to map Ireland’s entire seabed territory. The programme began in 1999 as the Irish National Seabed Survey and continues today as INFOMAR*, a joint venture by the Geological Survey of Ireland and the Marine Institute. It’s one of the largest seabed mapping programmes in the world. The Real Map of Ireland shows Ireland's current designated Irish Continental Shelf, which is one of the largest seabed territories in Europe. The continental shelf is the extension of a State's territorial waters, where the natural land extends under the sea to the outer edge of the continental margin beyond 200 nautical miles from the coastline baseline. We have sovereign rights over the continental shelf to explore and develop its natural resources, according to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Part VI.
  • Newport Research Facility, Annual Report No. 64, 2019

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2020)
  • CE20_02 INFOMAR Survey Report

    Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI. The programme succeeded the INSS which was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas.
  • INFOMAR Survey Report CE20_01, Celtic Sea.

    Sheehan, Kevin (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI. The programme succeeded the INSS which was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. Figure 1 shows the extent of the mapped area under INSS and INFOMAR and the outstanding areas as of January 2020. Grey have already been mapped, blue and coloured hatched areas are unmapped.
  • INFOMAR Survey Report CE19_01, Celtic Sea.

    Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2020)
    The Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI. The programme succeeded the INSS which was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. Figure 1 shows the extent of the mapped area under INSS and INFOMAR and the outstanding areas as of January 2019. Grey have already been mapped, blue and coloured hatched areas are unmapped.

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