The Marine Institute is the national agency responsible for Marine Research, Technology Development and Innovation (RTDI). We seek to assess and realise the economic potential of Ireland's 220 million acre marine resource; promote the sustainable development of marine industry through strategic funding programmes and essential scientific services; and safeguard our marine environment through research and environmental monitoring.

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Recent Submissions

  • The Stock Book 2022: Annual Review of Fish Stocks in 2022 with Management Advice for 2023

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
    The Stock Book is the principal annual publication of the Marine Institute's Fisheries Ecosystems Advisory Services (FEAS). Its purpose is to provide the latest impartial scientific advice on the commercially exploited fish stocks of interest to Ireland. The Stock Book is used by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine - (DAFM) at the Total Allowable Catch (TAC) negotiations with the EU in December and throughout the year at fisheries management meetings.
  • Baseline study of Essential Ocean Variable monitoring in Irish waters; current measurement programmes & data quality

    Nolan, Glenn; Cusack, C.; Fitzhenry, Deirdre; McGovern, Evin; Cronin, Margot; O'Donnell, Garvan; O'Dowd, Leonie; Clarke, M; Reid, D.G.; Clarke, Dave; et al. (Marine Institute, 2021)
    This report provides an initial assessment of Ireland’s current measurement programmes and capacity for Essential Ocean Variables (EOV) data collection. These are typically programmes that involve physical sampling of the marine environment, using a combination of ship-based measurements, fixed platforms e.g. tide and wave gauges, offshore buoys, autonomous platforms e.g. underwater gliders, and conventional collection of physical samples that are analysed on board ships or in shore-based laboratories. Systematic measurement of essential ocean variables underpins the delivery of services to government and the public in terms of real-time decision support, assessments of ocean health e.g. Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), Oslo & Paris Conventions (OSPAR), International Council on the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and long-term observations to inform policy on marine climate change and provide climate information to guide related adaptation measures required under climate change sectoral adaptation plans e.g. seafood sector, transport, biodiversity, and built heritage.
  • LESSON PLAN GEOGRAPHY: Title: Observing the Weather from the Ocean – Buoy oh Buoy Weather Observations

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
    The aim of the lesson plans and activities is to help children develop their geographical investigating skills relating to weather observation. The lesson plans and work sheets are cross curricular covering geography, english and art. They are suited for 4th – 6th Class. Learn about the weather buoy network that monitor the weather in Ireland. This lesson plan includes three activity sheets, including a collage template.
  • Lesson Plan Geography: Observing the Weather

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
    The aim of the lesson plans and activities is to help children develop their geographical investigating skills relating to weather observation. The lesson plans and work sheets are cross curricular covering geography, english and art. They are suited for 4th – 6th Class. In these activities, children will make weather badges, learn about Irish weather, and weather around the world, including the influence the ocean currents have on it. This lesson plan has four worksheets involved.
  • S.P.H.E Lesson Plan: Understanding the Effects of Climate Change

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2022)
    In this lesson plan, children will learn about the different impacts climate change has on different regions. They will learn how it is affecting the ocean and how this impacts people around the world through research, as well as what people around the world are doing to combat it. This lesson is suitable for 5th to 6th Class.
  • S.P.H.E Lesson Plan: Developing the 9 Rs for the Ocean

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2022)
    Through this lesson plan, children learn more about the impacts of climate change on humans and the ocean, and how these are linked. By doing a survey and creating a poster on the 9 R’s, the children will decide on positive actions they and their communities can do to lesson the impact of climate change. This lesson is suitable for 4th to 6th Class.
  • S.P.H.E Lesson: All About Me and the Sea

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla (Marine Institute, 2022)
    In this lesson plan, children develop their ideas about who they are and what they value, and how this links to them caring for the environment and the ocean. The children will use photos and images to create a portfolio highlighting what they love about the ocean. This lesson plan includes a work sheet and is suitable for 3rd to 6th Class
  • The Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks Nephrops Grounds (FU2021) 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

    Doyle, Jennifer; Aristegui, M.; Sullivan, M.; O’Connor, Sean; Kinneen, Michael; Sugrue, S.; Derbyshire, Cian; Ryan, G; Bentley, K.; Graham, Jessica; et al. (Marine Institute, 2022)
    This report provides the main results of the 2022 underwater television survey on the ‘Labadie, Jones and Cockburn Banks’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 2021. The 2022 annual survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. A total of 92 UWTV stations were completed at 6 nm intervals over a randomised isometric grid design. The mean burrow density was 0.10 burrows/m2 compared with 0.12 burrows/m2 in the year 2021. The 2022 geostatistical abundance estimate was 1032 million, a 14% decrease on the abundance from 2021, with a CV of 5%, which is well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS 2012. Low to medium densities were observed throughout the ground. Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2023 that correspond to the ICES MSY approach of 1803 tonnes assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2019–2021. One species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis) was recorded as present at the stations surveyed. Trawl marks were observed at 20% of the stations surveyed.
  • The “Smalls” Nephrops Grounds (FU22) 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

    Doyle, Jennifer; Aristegui, M.; O’Connor, Sean; Sullivan, M.; Kinneen, Michael; Sugrue, S.; Derbyshire, Cian (Marine Institute, 2022)
    This report provides the main results and findings of the seventeenth annual underwater television survey on the ‘Smalls grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 22. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. A total of 42 UWTV stations were surveyed successfully (high quality image data), carried out over an isometric grid at 4.5nmi or 8.3km intervals. The precision, with a CV of 7%, was well below the upper limit of 20% recommended by SGNEPS (ICES, 2012). The 2022 abundance estimate was 36% higher than in 2022 and at 895 million is below the MSY Btrigger reference point (990 million). Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2023 that correspond to the ICES MSY approach of 2548 tonnes, assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2019 - 2021. One species of sea pen was recorded as present at the stations surveyed: Virgularia mirabilis. Trawl marks were observed at 29% of the stations surveyed.
  • Creative Writing – Planning an Ocean Superhero Story

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
    The aim of the lesson plan is for the children to use their imagination and create a story about a super-hero that needs the children’s help with solving problems that climate change is causing around the world (e.g. effects on the animals in the ocean etc). The planning session and sheets will provide the children the skills to brainstorm and develop their ideas about a superhero, the super heroes super-powers and how the children can work together to care for our ocean. This lesson is suitable for 4th to 6th Class and includes a story planning sheet (separate document).
  • FU19 Nephrops Grounds 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

    Doyle, Jennifer; Aristegui, M.; Ryan, G.; Bentley, K.; Graham, Jessica; Oliver, Patrick; O’Brien, Betty; Sullivan, M.; O’Connor, Sean; Kinneen, Michael; et al. (Marine Institute, 2022)
    This report provides the main results of the twelfth underwater television survey of the various Nephrops patches in Functional Unit 19. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. In 2022 a total 42 UWTV stations were successfully completed. The mean density estimates varied considerably across the different patches. The 2022 raised abundance estimate showed a 4% decrease from the 2021 estimate and at 259 million burrows is below the MSY Btrigger reference point (430 million). Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data implies catch in 2023 that correspond to the F ranges in the EU multi annual plan for Western Waters are between 302 and 338 tonnes (assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2019–2021). One species of sea pen was observed; Virgularia mirabilis which has been observed on previous surveys of FU19. Trawl marks were observed at 12% of the stations surveyed.
  • Porcupine Bank Nephrops Grounds (FU16) 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

    Aristegui, M.; Doyle, Jennifer; Blaszkowski, M; Harvey, Jessica; O’Connor, Sean; Perez Tadeo, M.; Tangye, Tom; De Vos, Ennis; White, Jonathan (Marine Institute, 2022)
    This report provides the results of the tenth underwater television on the ‘Porcupine Bank Nephrops grounds’ ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 16. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV and other ecosystem data. In total 58 UWTV stations were successfully completed out of the 68 stations planned in a randomised 6 nautical mile isometric grid covering the full spatial extent of the stock. The mean burrow density observed in 2022, adjusted for edge effect, was 0.19 burrows/m². The final krigged abundance estimate was 1363 million burrows with a CV of 3% and an estimated stock area of 7,124 km2. The 2022 abundance estimate was 34% higher than in 2021. Using the 2022 estimate of abundance and updated stock data imply that catches in 2023 should be between 3054 and 3787 tonnes, according to the EU MAP and ICES MSY approach (assuming that all catch is landed). Three species of sea-pen (Virgularia mirabilis, Funiculina quadrangularis and the deepwater sea-pen Kophobelemnon stelliferum) were observed during the survey. Trawl marks were also observed on 52% of the stations surveyed.
  • CV21_03 INFOMAR Survey Report

    Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2022)
    Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore.
  • CE21_01 INFOMAR Survey Report

    Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2022)
    Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore.
  • CV21_02 INFOMAR Survey Report

    Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2022)
    Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore.
  • CV21_01 INFOMAR Survey Report

    Sheehan, Kevin; INFOMAR Survey Team (Marine Institute, 2022)
    Geological Survey Ireland (GSI) and Marine Institute (MI) conducted seabed mapping between 2003 and 2005 under the auspices of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and this continued from 2006 to present day under the INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Irelands MArine Resource (INFOMAR) programme. INSS was one of the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken globally, with a focus on deep water mapping. INFOMAR is a joint venture between the GSI and the MI and is funded by the Irish Government through the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications (DECC). INFOMAR Phase 1, 2006 to 2015 focused on mapping 26 priority bays and 3 priority areas around Ireland and creating a range of integrated mapping products of the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed in those areas. INFOMAR Phase 2, 2016 to 2026 intends to map the remainder of Ireland’s entire seabed. As of 2018 the remaining survey area has been split at the 30 nautical mile limit (Nm). The inshore survey fleet, managed by GSI is responsible for mapping inshore of the 30Nm limit and the MI vessels are responsible for mapping the offshore.
  • English 4th to 6th Class, Creative Writing. Creating Dialogue: Superhero Characters Save the Ocean

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
    The aim of the lesson plan is for the children to develop ideas and discuss how climate change is affecting the ocean. They will then establish the conversations that characters will have to help tell their story. The children will work in pairs or teams to develop dialogue for a creative story of how their superhero battles against a Climate Change villain. This lesson plan is suitable for 4th to 6th Class.
  • English 4th to 6th Class: Developing Writing Styles - Using Paragraphs to Create an Ocean Superhero

    Marine Institute (Marine Institute, 2022)
    In this lesson children will learn about different kinds of writing styles such as explanatory, descriptive, and persuasive as they write about an Ocean Hero or hero that inspires them and through this learn more about climate change and the ocean. This lesson is suitable for 4th to 6th Class.
  • Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne Head Nephrops Grounds (FU17) 2022 UWTV Survey Report and catch scenarios for 2023

    Aristegui, M.; Doyle, Jennifer; Bentley, K.; Graham, Jessica; O’Brien, Elizabeth; Oliver, Patrick; Ryan, Gráinne (Marine Institute, 2022)
    This report provides the main results and findings of the 21st annual underwater television survey on the Aran, Galway Bay and Slyne head Nephrops grounds, ICES assessment area; Functional Unit 17. In 2022, due to disruption to the survey schedule caused by weather downtime, the UWTV survey could not complete the Aran Grounds and Slyne Head stations, and was only able to complete successfully the 5 Galway Bay stations. The survey was multi-disciplinary in nature collecting UWTV, CTD and other ecosystem data. The mean burrow density observed in Galway Bay, adjusted for edge effect, was 0.19 burrows/m2; and the final abundance estimate for this ground was 15 million burrows with a CV (Coefficient of Variance; relative standard error) of 3%. There were no sea-pen species nor trawl marks observed in the footage from Galway Bay. The 2022 UWTV survey was not deemed robust enough to derive fishing advice for 2023 owing to the reduced number of stations. As such, the stock size is considered unknown for 2022. Therefore, the assessment and catch advice for 2023 is based on the 2021 UWTV survey. The 2021 combined abundance estimate (331 million burrows) was below the MSY Btrigger reference (540 million burrows). Using the 2021 estimate of abundance and updated stock data imply that catches in 2023 should be no more than 363 tonnes, according to the EU MAP and ICES MSY approach and assuming that discard rates and fishery selection patterns do not change from the average of 2019–2021.
  • Summary Report on 2021 Residue Monitoring of Irish Farmed Fish & 2021 Border Inspection Post Fishery Product Testing undertaken at the Marine Institute

    Glynn, Denise; McGovern, Evin; Farragher, E.; Kelly, Corrine; Moffat, R.; Kaur, Navdeep; Toomey, M. (Marine Institute, 2022)
    On behalf of the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine (DAFM), the Marine Institute carries out monitoring of chemical residues in finfish for aquaculture sector. This monitoring is set out in the annual National Residue Control Plan, which is approved by the European Commission, and is an important component of the DAFM food safety controls and is implemented under a service contract with the Food Safety Authority of Ireland. Since 1999, the Marine Institute has implemented the National Residues Monitoring Programme for aquaculture. This is carried out on behalf of the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority, which is the responsible organisation for residue controls on farmed finfish. In 2021, in excess of 632 tests and a total of 1,870 measurements were carried out on 120 samples of farmed finfish for a range of residues. Implementation of the Aquaculture 2021 Plan involves taking samples at both farm and processing plant: *80 target samples taken at harvest: 70 farmed salmon and 10 freshwater trout. *40 target samples were taken at other stages of production: 30 salmon smolts and 10 freshwater trout. All 2021 samples were compliant. For target sampling of farmed fish, a summary table of the residue results from 2005 - 2021 is outlined in Table 1. Overall, the outcome for aquaculture remains one of consistently low occurrence of residues in farmed finfish, with no non-compliant target residues results for the period 2006-2014, 0.11% and 0.10% non-compliant target residues results in 2015 and 2016 respectively and no non-compliant target results for the period 2017 to 2021.

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