• Harmful and nuisance algal blooms in Irish coastal waters 1990 - 1993

      Silke, J.; Jackson, D. (ICES, 1993)
      Algal blooms occur naturally around our coast. These high concentrations of planktonic algae are associated with favourable conditions of light and nutrients, and often occur at stratification/ mixing fronts. Many blooms are completely harmless, and form the diet of shellfish and zooplankton. Some colour the water red or brown. A few species are toxic and can cause fish kills or make shellfish unsafe to eat. The Fisheries Research Centre monitors phytoplankton in order to detect any toxic or potentially harmful blooms. The harmful and nuisance algal events from 1990 to 1993 are described.
    • Harmful phytoplankton events caused by variability in the Irish Coastal Current along the west of Ireland

      O'Boyle, S.; Nolan, G.; Raine, R. (UNESCO IOC, 2001)
      Frequent sampling in summer along the western and northwestern coasts of Ireland showed the rapid onshore development of blooms of potentially harmful phytoplankton species. In both 1998 and 1999, concentrations of Gyrodinium cf. aureolum rose by four orders of magnitude to over one million cells per litre in Donegal Bay(northwestern Ireland) in less than 10days. The rapid development of these populations was linked to advection resulting from unfavourable wind-forcing of the Irish Coastal Current (ICG) which runs northwards along the western Irish coast. Current measurements showed that after a particular sequence of changes in wind direction phytoplankton populations could be rapidly advected from areas of slack circulation on the shelf via the ICC into aquaculturally sensitive coastal zones such as Donegal Bay. The model presented is similar to one already demonstrated for the occurrence of toxic events in the bays of southwestern Ireland. Other historical harmful events along the west and northwest coasts relating to substantial losses in both finfish and shellfish culture could also be explained using the model. These include the G. aureolum bloom of 1992, the Prorocentrum balticum bloom in 1997.
    • Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth: An Integrated Marine Plan for Ireland

      Inter-Departmental Marine Coordination Group (Inter-Departmental Marine Coordination Group, 2012)
      Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth is an Integrated Marine Plan (IMP), setting out a roadmap for the Government’s vision, high-level goals and integrated actions across policy, governance and business to enable our marine potential to be realised. Implementation of this Plan will see Ireland evolve an integrated system of policy and programme planning for our marine affairs.
    • Have Hatcheries a Role in Sea-Trout Management?

      Fahy, E (Department of Fisheries and Forestry (Trade and Information Section), 1983)
      The artificial propagation of sea trout in Ireland has a long history but the fish were never produced in large numbers and they were disposed of at an early stage in development. The evidence suggests that artificial propagation was undertaken as a by-product of salmon management. The circumstances in which artificial propagation of sea trout may be justified are examined and some general reservations are expressed. For the future it seems likely that sea trout will be exploited in wild rather than in put-and-take fisheries. The emphasis should remain on providing the most suitable nursery conditions for the fish to reproduce naturally. Further investigations should however be undertaken on devising suitable methods of propagating sea trout and consideration might be given to re-establishing some of the long lived strains which are now believed to be extinct.
    • Heavy Metals in Mussels and Sea-Water from the Irish Coast

      Crowley, M; Murphy, C (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1976)
      Samples of mussels and sea-waters from various locations around the Irish coast were analysed for certain heavy metals using Atomic Absorption (AA) Spectroscopy. The results are presented and discussed below.
    • The Herring Fisheries of Ireland

      Molloy, J P (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1970)
      Not since Farran (1941) published his paper, entitled "The herring fisheries in Eire, 1923 - 1941" has an attempt been made to describe the herring fisheries of Ireland. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to provide information about the various fisheries around the Irish coast in the decade from 1960 to 1969. For convenience, the coast has been divided into five areas, namely the east coast, the south coast, the southwest coast, the west coast and the northwest coast. The principle ports and major herring grounds, the type of boats and gear used, the seasonal abundance and total catch, the type of herring caught, with regard to size, condition, number per kilogram and fat content, the present methods of disposal of the catch and any other relevant details are described for each area.
    • The Herring Fisheries on the North-West and West Coasts 1970 and 1971

      Kennedy, T D (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1971)
      The main herring fishery off the north-west coast continued to take place from October to February, although an increased quantity of herrings was also landed during the period March to September.
    • Herring fisheries on the South and South West coasts 1974-75

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1975)
      The important herring fishery which takes place during the winter months off the South Coast is reviewed. The fishery, which exploits the Celtic Sea Stock of herring, yielded over 68,000 cran in 1974/75 compared with 62,000 cran in the previous season. However, because of poor prices, the value of the fishery declined, from £1.4 million in 1973/74 to £1.3 million. The increased landing, despite abnormally severe weather in January, were attributed to a corresponding increase in effort, as herring were generally considered to be much less abundant. Scientific examination showed that for the second year in succession the recruitment of three year old herring was very low, and this, coupled with the continued high fishing rate means that the total stock is now at its lowest strength since the middle fifties. The autumn fishery off the South West coast was a disappointing one because of decreased catches.
    • Herring fisheries on the South and South West coasts 1975-76

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1976)
      The quantities and value of herring landed during the 1975/76 herring season off the south coast are reviewed. The quantity landed showed a further serious decrease due to a decline in stock size which has occurred in recent years. This decline in stock size is due to a failure of recruitment and a continuation of a fishing rate that is too high. The present conservation measures are not adequate to protect this stock and it is considered necessary by the liaison committee to the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea that all herring fishing in the Celtic Sea should be stopped for a period if the stock is to be restored to its former strength.
    • The herring fisheries on the South and south West coats 1976-77

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1977)
      The quantities and values of herring landed during the 1976/77 herring season off the south coast and during the July to November period off the south west coast are reviewed. In both areas there was a further serious decline in the catch - mainly due to a continuing very poor rate of recruitment of young herring to the adult stock. In the Celtic Sea the total international catch during 1976/77 was only 7,000 tonnes compared with 48,000 tonnes in 1969, while the total Irish catch of approximately 3,000 tonnes was the lowest since the mid-fifties. The immediate aim of any management policy for the Celtic Sea herring stock must be to rebuild it to a level of at least 40,000 tomes. It is, at present, estimated to be below 10,000 tonnes. This can only be done by having a complete ban on all herring fishing in the Celtic Sea until 1980 at least.
    • The Herring Fisheries on the South and South-West Coasts 1970/71

      Molloy, J P (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1971)
      The 1970/71 winter herring fishery off the south coast, based mainly at the ports of Dunmore East and Cobh, began in the week ending 14th November, 1970, and ended on the 4th February, 1971. Eighty boats, seven more than in the 1969/70 season, took part in the fishery and landed a total of 110,816 crans. The total landing, which was an increase of 13,880 crans on the quantity for the previous season, was the highest yet recorded. During the season landings were made on 63 days out of a possible 74. The weather, which prior to Christmas had been reasonably favourable, deteriorated during January and brought fishing to a standstill on a number of occasions. This factor, together with the disappearance of the shoals in early February, closed the fishing season earlier than in the previous four seasons. All herrings landed were auctioned at either Dunmore East or Cobh.
    • Herring Fisheries on the South and South-West Coasts 1971-1972

      Molloy, J P (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1972)
      The 1971/72 winter herring fishery off the south coast began in the week ending 30 October, 1971, and ended on 23 February, 1972. The total landing of 79,792 crans was over 30,000 crans (-28%) less than the total landed in the record previous season of 1970/71. Most of the landings were auctioned at either Dunmore East or Cobh, although small quantities on occasion were landed at Kilmore Quay, Ballycotton and Kinsale. Eighty-three boats – three more than in the 1970/71 season – took part in the fishery at various times throughout the season and landings were made on 77 days out of a possible 103.
    • Herring fisheries on the south and South-west coasts 1972-73

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1972)
      The 1972/73 winter herring fishery off the south coast began in the week ending 4 November 1972 and ended on 17 February 1973. The total landings at the ports of Dunmore East and Cobh amounted to 109,301 crans which was slightly short of the record catch of 110,816 crans made in the 1970/71 season. This represents an increase of 29,509 crans on the figure for the 1971/72 season. Eighty three boats, the same number as in 1971/72, took part in the fishery and landings were made on 80 days out of a possible 92. The introduction of a quota system which restricted catches for periods before and after Christmas undoubtedly contributed to the total catch being lower than it could have been.
    • The herring fisheries on the South and South-West coasts 1977-78

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1978)
      Herring fishing off the south coast, in that area now commonly known as the Celtic Sea, was prohibited during most of the year commencing 1 April 1977. In spite of this, however, nearly 3,000 tans of adult herring are believed to have been taken, mainly by Irish and Dutch vessels. Scientific investigations and the results obtained from a trawling survey carried out from September 1977 to January 1978 indicated that the spawning stock is still in a very depleted condition. Recruitment of young herring to the adults stocks during the last three years has been critically low and because the adult stock size is now estimated to be only 10,000 tons a continuation of the existing ban on fishing must be envisaged for some time. The fishery off the south west coast in 1977, showed an increase in landings largely due to increased catches in November off Fenit, Co Kerry.
    • Herring fisheries on the south and southwest coasts 1973-74

      Molloy, J (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1974)
      The 1973/74 winter herring fishery off the south coast began in the week ending 10 November 1973 and ended on 26 February 1974. Some small landings were however made in the weeks before 10 November. The total landing at the ports of Dunmore East and Cobh amounted to 62192 cran. This was 47109 crans lower than the figure for the previous year and was in fact the lowest figure since the 1966/67 season. Seventy three boats, ten less than in the previous season, took part in the fishery. In the interest of conservation of the stocks it had been agreed prior to the opening of the season that no fishing should take place on Sunday nights. This practice was maintained throughout the season with the result that fishing only took place on 58 days out of a possible 90 days. Continuous broken weather throughout January and February also severely hampered fishing operations and because of this the fleet operating from Cobh was able to fish on only 16 nights from Christmas until the 28 February.
    • Herring investigations on the north west and west coasts 1973-74

      Kennedy, T D (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1974)
      While the main herring fishery off the north-west coasts covered the period October 1973 to February 1974, a considerable quantity of herrings was also landed during the period March - September 1973. The section of this report covering the north-west coast is thus divided into two sections, that concerned with the period March to September 1973 (the off season) and that with the period October 1973 to February 1974 (the main season). A further section deals with the fishery off the County Galway coast.
    • Herring investigations on the North West and West coasts 1974-75

      Molloy, J; Kennedy, T D (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1975)
      The main herring fisheries off the Donegal, Mayo and Galway coasts during 1974/75 are reviewed. Landings in all areas decreased considerably and it is thought that this was due mainly to the very poor weather. Recruitment of young fish to the adult fishery was about average off Donegal and slightly better off Galway. The relationship between these herrings to one another and also to those herring exploited off the Scottish coast is discussed.
    • Herring investigations on the North West and West coasts 1975-76

      Molloy, J; Kennedy, T D (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1976)
      The herring fisheries off the northwest and west coasts during 1975 and 1976 are reviewed. Details are given about value of the fishery off the Donegal, Mayo and Galway coasts in recent years. Scientific examinations show that there has been a decline in stock size in the area, chiefly due to poor recruitment of young herring. The question of management of the fishery is also discussed in view of the increased catches by continental fleets fishing in the area.
    • Herring Investigations on the North-West and West Coasts 1971-1972

      Kennedy, T D (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1972)
      Although the main herring fishery off the north-west coast in 1971/72 covered the period from October, 1971 to February, 1972, a substantial quantity of herrings was landed during the period March to September, 1971.
    • Herring investigations on the North-west and west coasts 1972-1973

      Kennedy, T D (Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Fisheries Division), 1973)
      Although the main herring fishery off the north west coast in 1972/73, covered the period from October 1972 to February 1973, a considerable quantity of herrings was also landed during the period March to September 1972. The section of this report covering the north west coast is thus divided into two sections, that concerned with the period March to September 1972 (the off season) and that with the period October 1972 to February 1973 (the main season). A further section deals with the fishery off the west coast, in Galway Bay.