Marine Institute Open Access Repository

Welcome to the Marine Institute Open Access Repository

The Marine Institute Open Access Repository facilitates full text access to the publications of the Marine Institute in accordance with copyright permissions. The aim of the Repository is to collect, preserve and provide open access to the publications of the Marine Institute, including the research publications supported by National and European funded marine research programmes.

 

 

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  • Explorers Learning about Squid: KRAKEN the Sea Monster Presentation

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Crowley, Danielle; Manning, Eimear (Marine Institute, 2021)
    The Explorers Learning about Squid: KRAKEN the Sea Monster Presentation provides a series of fun facts that used to discuss the history, myths and stories of the giant squid. The Presentations can be used as PowerPoint or interactive presentations on a Whiteboard. The presentation includes lots of images that portray the Kraken in many guises. Photographs and images are Istock as well as Alamy. This PowerPoint may be used for educational purposes and the images must retain all of their image copyright details.
  • Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: My CSI Squid Workbook

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear; Quinn, Anna (Marine Institute, 2021)
    Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: My CSI Squid Workbook, is an accompanying workbook to the books- CSI Squid for Beginners and CSI Our Favourite Squid Species. Learning about animals such as squid, help us discover some of the amazing things about marine biodiversity and adaptation; as well as exploring the ocean around the world.
  • Atlantic Herring in 6aS/7b, Industry Acoustic Survey Cruise Report, November-December 2020 and January 2021.

    O'Malley, M.; Mullins, Eugene; Nolan, Cormac (Marine Institute, 2021)
    An acoustic survey of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus was conducted in ICES areas 6aS/7b in November-December 2020 and January 2021. The 2020 survey was conducted using five vessels; MFVs Crystal Dawn WD201, Ros Ard SO745, Johnny G S653, Abigail S SO354, and St. Catherine D299. The 6aS/7b survey design changed in 2020 compared with previous years in that only 6 core areas with prior knowledge of herring distribution from the monitoring fishery were targeted for surveying. This was largely based on the results from ICES WKHASS (ICES 2020) and from lessons learned in the previous surveys in this area from 2016-2019. This design resulted in a much reduced survey area compared to previous years, but with better coverage of most of the important inshore bays where the monitoring fishery takes place. The survey design objective remained the same; to capture the distribution of winter spawning herring in the 6aS/7b area, but this design was not expected to achieve overall stock containment. The timing of surveys in the core areas was flexible from the outset by design. It was decided that greater flexibility would allow for a targeted spatial and temporal approach which avoided the inevitable poor weather that can happen in this area during this time of the year and which lead to reduced survey effort in previous years. Using smaller vessels allowed surveys to be conducted in shallow inshore areas where herring are known to aggregate during this time of the year. This survey is the fifth consecutive annual acoustic survey for herring in this area at this time of the year. A pole-mounted system with a combi 38 kHz (split) 200 kHz (single) transducer was used successfully for the survey on small vessels (<18m) in 2020. Herring were again distributed inshore in shallow areas, and the improved survey design and use of small vessels for the survey resulted in a good measure of uncertainty (CV). The stock was not overall contained in 2020, particularly in the Donegal Bay area (Bruckless, Inver Bays, etc.) and more effort is required to target survey effort later in December and January when herring appear to show up in these areas in greater numbers. The COVID pandemic affected the ability to conduct surveys in late December. Very strong herring marks were evident in Lough Foyle and Lough Swilly in the channel in marks that extended for many miles. This was in areas where smaller boats in the fishery were concentrating effort. There was also a series of herring marks in Bruckless Bay, Fintra Bay and Inver Bay in discreet areas. There were a few small herring marks in the Achill strata. The monitoring fishery was being conducted on smaller boats in the same areas and close to the same time as the survey and biological samples from some of these vessels were used. There was a wide distribution of length classes in all hauls, with most hauls dominated by larger (> 22 cm) mature fish. The 2- and 3-wr age class of herring accounted for 54% of the overall numbers in 2020. The total stock biomass (TSB) estimate of 45,046 tonnes is considered to be a minimum estimate of herring in the 6aS/7b survey area at the time of the survey. The flexible survey design and focusing on discreet areas was generally successful and should provide a template for future survey designs.
  • Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: Squid For Beginners

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear; Quinn, Anna (Marine Institute, 2021)
    Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: SQUID FOR BEGINNERS provides an introduction to squid for children and teachers to use in the classroom and aims to inspire a new generation of explorers. The book introduces children to science classification and the names given to squid; cephalopod evolution; and where squid are distributed and their different habitats. The book also has a section about a squids anatomy and supports the Explorers Learning about Squid Film Cephalopod Science Investigations: Squid Dissection & Fun Facts, where the special features of squid are discussed. A chapter is also dedicated to the Kraken and highlights how the giant squid has been introduced into many cultures, over hundreds of years as a giant sea monster. The book also shows our connections with squid from yummy ‘squidulicious’ food, fishing, climate change to squid in museums and sculptures. Finally, the book also highlights how squid features are influencing science, technology and engineering.
  • Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations: Our Favourite Squid Species

    Dromgool-Regan, Cushla; Manning, Eimear; Quinn, Anna (Marine Institute, 2021)
    Explorers Cephalopod Science Investigations OUR FAVOURITE SQUID SPECIES provides an introduction to squid species. Learning about animals such as squid, help us discover some of the amazing things about marine biodiversity and adaptation; as well as exploring the ocean around the world. This book looks at ten squid species found around the world including the largest squid in the world called the giant squid to the smallest pygmy squid, which is the size of your finger nail. Each squid information sheet identifies the English, Irish and scientific name of the squid species; its size, colour and life span. The squid sheets also highlights the ocean that the squid lives in, its habitat; what it looks like; how the squid protects itself; what it eats; and its predators.

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