Marine Institute Open Access Repository

Welcome to the Marine Institute Open Access Repository

The Marine Institute Open Access Repository facilitates full text access to the publications of the Marine Institute in accordance with copyright permissions. The aim of the Repository is to collect, preserve and provide open access to the publications of the Marine Institute, including the research publications supported by National and European funded marine research programmes.

 

 

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  • Surface Temperature Observations at Coninbeg Lightship on the South Coast of Ireland

    Farran, G. (Conseil International pour l'Exploration de la Mer (ICES), 1939)
  • Negotiations for the establishment of a pilchard fishery at Bantry in 1875

    Went, A. E. J. (Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 1875)
  • The fat/water relationship in the mackerel Scomber scombrus L., pilchard, Sardina pilchardus (Walbaum) and sprat, Sprattus sprattus L., and the seasonal variation in fat content by size and maturity.

    Wallace, P. D.; Hulme, T. J. (Ministry of agriculture, fisheries and food Directorate of fisheries research., 1977)
    Mackerel, pilchard and sprat have the ability to store fat in their body tissues. During the spring and summer, when their main source of food, zooplankton, is abundant, fat reserves are accumulated. These reserves are utilized in the autumn and winter when zooplankton are scarce. Consequently, wide variations in fat content occur throughout a single year of life of these species. This report describes the relationship that exists between fat and water in these species and describes how the fat content varies with size, maturity stage and season.
  • Herring larval surveys in the Celtic Sea and division VIIj in 1982/83

    Grainger, R. J.; Barnwall, E.; Cullen, A. (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, 1983)
    Surveys for herring larvae in the Celtic Sea were conducted between October 1982 ~ and February 1983 for the fifth successive season. To take account of the amalgamation of the Celtic Sea and Div VIIJ herring for assessment purposes and to ascertain if many larval drift into the Irish Sea, the survey grid of previous years was modified for the 1982/83 season. However, because of the nature of the larvae distribution it appears reasonable to compare the larvae index for 1982/83 with those of the previous seasons. The increase in indices since 1978/79 has continued up to 1982/83 indicating a steady, but slow, recovery of the spawning stock. Very few larvae appear to drift into the Irish Sea.
  • Biosensors for the monitoring of harmful algal blooms

    McPartlin, D. A.; Loftus, J. H.; Crawley, A. S.; Silke, J.; Murphy, C. S.; O’Kennedy, R. J. (Elsevier, 2017)
    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a major global concern due to their propensity to cause environmental damage, healthcare issues and economic losses. In particular, the presence of toxic phytoplankton is a cause for concern. Current HAB monitoring programs often involve laborious laboratory-based analysis at a high cost and with long turnaround times. The latter also hampers the potential to develop accurate and reliable models that can predict HAB occurrence. However, a promising solution for this issue may be in the form of remotely deployed biosensors, which can rapidly and continuously measure algal and toxin levels at the point-of-need (PON), at a low cost. This review summarises the issues HABs present, how they are difficult to monitor and recently developed biosensors that may improve HAB-monitoring challenges.

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