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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10793/83

Title: When good neighbours become good friends: observing small scale structures in fish aggregations using multibeam sonar
Authors: Gerlotto, F
Jones, E
Bez, N
Reid, D G
Keywords: Anchovy
Behaviour
Geostatistics
Multibeam Sonar
Fish School
Spatial Structure
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: EDP Sciences
Citation: Francois Gerlotto, Emma Jones, Nicolas Bez and David G. Reid (2010). When good neighbours become good friends: observing small scale structures in fish aggregations using multibeam sonar. Aquatic Living Resources, 23 , pp 143-151 doi:10.1051/alr/2010017
Series/Report no.: Aquatic Living Resources;23 (2)
Abstract: Converging results in different scientific fields (behavioural ecology, fisheries biology, acoustic tagging, fisheries acoustics, behavioural modelling) suggest the existence of “micro-groups” inside fish schools. These would comprise a few (5–10) fish maintaining contact during a period long enough to allow individuals to recognise each other. It is hypothesised that they would prefer to share the space with familiar rather than anonymous conspecifics. To evaluate whether acoustic methods could be used to recognise “micro-structures” inside fish schools and help test the “micro-group” hypothesis we analysed acoustic data from anchovy schools off Peru, and gadoids in the North Sea. Data collection used a multibeam sonar (Reson SeaBat 6012). In the Peruvian case study, the sonar was mounted set horizontally on a drifting research vessel and the internal structure of the schools of anchovies was analysed, although individual fish could not be discriminated. In the North Sea case study, the sonar was orientated vertically above a demersal trawl to allow observation of individual fish entering the trawl. Geostatistical analyses were used to evaluate the existence of small spatial structures in anchovy schools. In these schools, “micro-structures” with a scale as small as 0.5 m were observed acoustically. For the gadoids nearest neighbour distance (NDD) measurements were carried out, suggesting that the fish aggregated in small groups (2 to 25 individuals, with an average of 3.7 fish per group) in the trawl catches. The perspectives and limitations of these results are discussed.
Description: © EDP Sciences, IFREMER, IRD 2010. Available online from http://www.alr-journal.org/ http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/alr/2010017
peer-reviewed
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10793/83
http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/alr/2010017
ISSN: 1765-2952
Appears in Collections:Peer Reviewed Scientific Papers

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