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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10793/828

Title: The Status and Management of Oyster (Ostrea edulis) in Ireland
Authors: Tully, O.
Clarke, S.
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Marine Institute
Citation: Tully, O., & Clarke, S., "The Status and Management of Oyster (Ostrea edulis) in Ireland”, Irish Fisheries Investigations No. 24, Marine Institute 2012
Series/Report no.: Irish Fisheries Investigations;24
Abstract: Fourteen oyster surveys were completed during 2010-2012 in 6 bays on the west coast of Ireland prior to and following annual late autumn fisheries. Vessel based surveys using locally designed dredges were undertaken using in Tralee Bay, Galway Bay, Kilkieran Bay, Clew Bay, Blacksod Bay and L. Swilly. Survey extent was defined by local knowledge of the distribution of beds in each bay and from previous survey reports. The extent of oyster beds, oyster densities, biomass, size composition and growth and mortality rates are reported. The governance and management of oyster fisheries in Ireland is described and conservation requirements for oyster habitat are discussed with reference to the EU Habitats Directive. Survey extents varied from 0.9-13km2. Population densities of oyster were generally <0.5 oysters m-2 but higher densities of up to 50 oysters m-2 occurred in areas of inner Tralee Bay. In other sites, densities did not exceed 5 oysters m-2. The majority of national oyster biomass occurred in inner Tralee Bay where biomass varied from 980-1330 tonnes in the 2010-12 surveys. Biomass in outer Tralee Bay and L. Swilly was approximately 100 and 124 tonnes, respectively. Biomass estimates in inner Galway Bay, Kilkieran Bay, Clew Bay and Blacksod Bay were all less than 50 tonnes. vonBertalanffy growth parameters, k and to, were 0.21year-1 and 0.23years respectively. These parameters were estimated from shell height frequency data and by fixing Linf at 120mm, based on the maximum size of oysters recovered during surveys. Total mortality rates (Z) were estimated from the linear portion of length converted catch curves using these derived growth parameters. Z estimates, in pre and post fishery surveys, averaged 1.07 and 1.30 respectively in 2010 and 0.94 and 1.55 respectively in 2011. Fishing mortality rate (F), derived from the difference in Z estimates in pre and post fishery surveys in inner Tralee Bay, was 0.9 representing an annual removal of 60% of oysters recruited to the fishery. Increase in biomass of a single cohort, simulated using derived growth rate parameters, the size weight relationship and different rates of natural mortality (M) suggests that maximum biomass develops prior to the minimum landing size of 76mm if M>0.4. Improved, site specific, estimates of growth and mortality rates and size at maturity data are needed to provide fisheries management advice for native oysters. Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was abundant and widespread, in what was previously Ostrea habitat, in L. Swilly. In some of these areas, Pacific oyster was the only oyster species present. In other areas both species co-existed although they were spatially segregated to a degree in relation to shore level.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10793/828
ISSN: 1649-0037
Appears in Collections:Irish Fisheries Investigations

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