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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10793/1246

Title: REDRISK: reduction of the virus risk in shellfish harvesting areas
Authors: Guilfoyle, F.
Keaveney, S.
Flannery, J.
Doré, B.
Keywords: Shellfish
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Marine Institute
Citation: Guilfoyle, F., Keaveney, S., Flannery, J. and Doré, B. (2006). REDRISK: reduction of the virus risk in shellfish harvesting areas. In: "Proceedings of the 7th Irish Shellfish Safety Workshop", Marine Environment and Health Series, No. 27, Marine Institute, 2007, pp. 20-27.
Series/Report no.: Marine Environment and Health Series;27
Abstract: Filter feeding bivalve shellfish can accumulate human pathogenic bacteria and viruses if grown in sewage-contaminated waters. Current consumer protection legislation relies on classification of harvesting areas based on their sanitary quality, using E coli as an indicator of sewage contamination. Advances in viral monitoring have shown that E coli can underestimate the extent of the contamination. The most common cause of gastroenteritis associated with shellfish is norovirus, commonly known as winter vomiting virus. The REDRISK project was undertaken to investigate the main environmental factors that cause viral contamination in shellfish. The REDRISK project is part of a EU research pillar with parallel research being undertaken in the UK, France and Spain. A recently developed technique to quantify norovirus in shellfish, real-time PCR, has been used in the REDRISK project. Clew Bay, in Co. Mayo was chosen as the study area in Ireland. The bay is generally considered to have good water quality but with certain areas subject to intermittent sewage contamination. The cooperation of local producers and organisations such as the Clew Bay Marine Forum and the Native Oyster Co-op greatly helped the project. The project was divided into a two-phased approach. Phase one involved the identification of contamination sources impacting the bay through a sanitary survey and selection of appropriate sites for further study. Results of the first phase of this study were presented previously at this forum (Keaveney, et al 2006) and the characteristics of the sites selected for study and locations within the bay are shown in table 1 and figure 1 respectively. The second phase of the project focused on monitoring environmental conditions and microbiological levels in shellfish to identify environmental conditions leading to viral contamination. This paper reports the finding of this monitoring.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10793/1246
Appears in Collections:Shellfish Microbiology

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